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  • Ballet′s Magic Kingdom - Selected Writings on Dance in Russia 1911-1925

    Akim Volynsky was a Russian literary critic, journalist and art historian who became Saint Petersburg's liveliest and most prolific ballet critic in the early part of the twentieth century. This book, the first English edition of his provocative and influential writings, provides a striking look at life inside the world of Russian ballet at a crucial era in its history. Stanley Rabinowitz selects and translates forty of Volynsky's articles - vivid eyewitness accounts that sparkle with details about the careers and personalities of such dance luminaries as Anna Pavlova, Mikhail Fokine, Tamara Karsavina and George Balanchine, at that time a young dancer in the Maryinsky company whose keen musical sense and creative interpretive power Volynsky was one of the first to recognize. Rabinowitz also translates Volynsky's magnum opus, 'The Book of Exaltations', an elaborate meditation on classical dance technique that is at once a primer and an ideological treatise. Throughout his writings, Volynsky emphasizes the spiritual and ethereal qualities of ballet, argues Rabinowitz in his critical introduction which sets Volynsky's life and work against the backdrop of the principal intellectual currents of the time.

  • The Climate Casino: Risk, Uncertainty, and Economics for a Warming World

    The 2018 Nobel laureate for economics analyzes the politics and economics of the central environmental issue of today and points the way to real solutions

    Climate change is profoundly altering our world in ways that pose major risks to human societies and natural systems. We have entered the Climate Casino and are rolling the global-warming dice, warns economist William Nordhaus. But there is still time to turn around and walk back out of the casino, and in this essential book the author explains how.

    Bringing together all the important issues surrounding the climate debate, Nordhaus describes the science, economics, and politics involved--and the steps necessary to reduce the perils of global warming. Using language accessible to any concerned citizen and taking care to present different points of view fairly, he discusses the problem from start to finish: from the beginning, where warming originates in our personal energy use, to the end, where societies employ regulations or taxes or subsidies to slow the emissions of gases responsible for climate change.

    Nordhaus offers a new analysis of why earlier policies, such as the Kyoto Protocol, failed to slow carbon dioxide emissions, how new approaches can succeed, and which policy tools will most effectively reduce emissions. In short, he clarifies a defining problem of our times and lays out the next critical steps for slowing the trajectory of global warming.

  • Gabriel Metsu - Life and Work - Catalogue Raisonne

    Despite his untimely death in 1667 at the age of thirty-seven, Gabriel Metsu left a substantial oeuvre of history paintings, portraits, still lifes, and a large number of exquisite genre scenes. These charming depictions of kitchen maids, elegant young ladies, hunters, drinkers, and amorous couples have gained Metsu a place among the most celebrated painters of seventeenth-century Holland. But his personal life has remained enigmatic. This absorbing book presents the information for Metsu's life and his network of connections, and details the complete range of his work. It will become the standard work on the artist.

  • Confessions of a Born-Again Pagan

    In this passionate and searching book, Anthony Kronman offers a third way--beyond atheism and religion--to the God of the modern world
    "An astonishing, . . . epically ambitious book. . . . An intellectual adventure story based on the notion that ideas drive history, and that to dedicate yourself to them is to live a bigger, more intense life."--David Brooks, New York Times
    We live in an age of disenchantment. The number of self-professed "atheists" continues to grow. Yet many still feel an intense spiritual longing for a connection to what Aristotle called the "eternal and divine." For those who do, but demand a God that is compatible with their modern ideals, a new theology is required. This is what Anthony Kronman offers here, in a book that leads its readers away from the inscrutable Creator of the Abrahamic religions toward a God whose inexhaustible and everlasting presence is that of the world itself. Kronman defends an ancient conception of God, deepened and transformed by Christian belief--the born-again paganism on which modern science, art, and politics all vitally depend. Brilliantly surveying centuries of Western thought--from Plato to Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant, from Spinoza to Nietzsche, Darwin, and Freud--Kronman recovers and reclaims the God we need today.

  • The Experience of God - Being, Consciousness, Bliss

    Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion--God--frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word "God" functions in the world's great theistic faiths. Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity's knowledge of the divine mysteries. Constructing his argument around three principal metaphysical "moments"--being, consciousness, and bliss--the author demonstrates an essential continuity between our fundamental experience of reality and the ultimate reality to which that experience inevitably points. Thoroughly dismissing such blatant misconceptions as the deists' concept of God, as well as the fundamentalist view of the Bible as an objective historical record, Hart provides a welcome antidote to simplistic manifestoes. In doing so, he plumbs the depths of humanity's experience of the world as powerful evidence for the reality of God and captures the beauty and poetry of traditional reflection upon the divine.

  • Critique of Religious Discourse

    An important work of contemporary Islamic thought argues against the programmatic use of Islamic religious texts to support fundamentalist beliefs

    First published in Arabic in 1994, progressive Muslim scholar Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd's controversial essay argued that conventional fundamentalist interpretations of the Quran and other Islamic religious texts are ahistorical and misleading. Conservative religious leaders accused him of apostasy. Marking the first time a work by Abu Zayd is available in its entirety in any Western language, this English edition makes his erudite interpretation of classical Islamic thought accessible to a wider audience at a critical historical moment.

  • The Network is your Customer - Five Strategies to Thrive in a Digital Age

    With clear analysis and practical frameworks, this book provides step-by-step guidance businesses can use to prosper in the new era of digital media

    "An incredibly useful and valuable guidebook to the new consumer economy. Buy it. Learn from it. Succeed with it."--Jeff Jarvis, author of What Would Google Do

    "This is the stuff that every business and nonprofit needs to embrace if they're going to succeed in a changing world."--Vivian Schiller, CEO of NPR With clear analysis and practical frameworks, this book provides a strategic guide that any business or nonprofit can use to succeed in the digital age.

    Marketing expert David Rogers examines how digital technologies--from smartphones to social networks--connect us in frameworks that transform our relationships to business and each other. To thrive today, organizations need new strategies--strategies designed for customer networks.

    Rogers offers five strategies that any business can use to create new value:

    • ACCESS--be faster, be easier, be everywhere, be always on
    • ENGAGE--become a source of valued content
    • CUSTOMIZE--make your offering adaptable to your customer's needs
    • CONNECT--become a part of your customers' conversations
    • COLLABORATE--involve your customers at every stage of your enterprise

    Rogers explains these five strategies with over 100 cases from every type and size of business--from shoes to news, and software to healthcare. In The Network Is Your Customer, he shows:

    • How Apple harnessed a host of collaborators to write apps for its iPhone
    • How IBM designed a videogame to help sell its enterprise software
    • How Ford Motors inspired an online community to build brand awareness for its new Fiesta

    ...and countless other cases from consumer, b2b, and nonprofit categories.

    The book outlines a process for planning and implementing a customer network strategy to match your customers, your business, and your objectives--whether you need to drive sales, to enhance innovation, to reduce costs, to gain customer insight, or to build breakthrough products and services. Because today, whatever your goals and whatever your business, the network is your customer.

  • The Secret Poisoner: A Century of Murder

    Murder by poison alarmed, enthralled, and in many ways encapsulated the Victorian age. Linda Stratmann's dark and splendid social history reveals the nineteenth century as a gruesome battleground where poisoners went head-to-head with authorities who strove to detect poisons, control their availability, and bring the guilty to justice. She corrects many misconceptions about particular poisons and documents how the evolution of issues such as marital rights and the legal protection of children impacted poisonings. Combining archival research with a novelist's eye, Stratmann charts the era's inexorable rise of poison cases both gruesome and sad.

  • Jealousy

    A witty and insightful investigation into the green-eyed monster's role in our lives

    Compete, acquire, succeed, enjoy: the pressures of living in today's materialistic world seem predicated upon jealousy--the feelings of rivalry and resentment for possession of whatever the other has. But while our newspapers abound with stories of the sometimes droll, sometimes deadly consequences of sexual jealousy, Peter Toohey argues in this charmingly provocative book that jealousy is much more than the destructive emotion it is commonly assumed to be. It helps as much as it harms.

    Examining the meaning, history, and value of jealousy, Toohey places the emotion at the core of modern culture, creativity, and civilization--not merely the sexual relationship. His eclectic approach weaves together psychology, art and literature, neuroscience, anthropology, and a host of other disciplines to offer fresh and intriguing contemporary perspectives on violence, the family, the workplace, animal behavior, and psychopathology. Ranging from the streets of London to Pacific islands, and from the classical world to today, this is an elegant, smart, and beautifully illustrated defense of a not-always-deadly sin.

  • The Most Good You Can Do - How Effective Altruism Is Changing Ideas About Living Ethically

    Peter Singer's books and ideas have been disturbing our complacency ever since the appearance of Animal Liberation. Now he directs our attention to a new movement in which his own ideas have played a crucial role: effective altruism. Effective altruism is built upon the simple but profound idea that living a fully ethical life involves doing the "most good you can do." Such a life requires an unsentimental view of charitable giving: to be a worthy recipient of our support, an organization must be able to demonstrate that it will do more good with our money or our time than other options open to us. Singer introduces us to an array of remarkable people who are restructuring their lives in accordance with these ideas, and shows how living altruistically often leads to greater personal fulfillment than living for oneself. The Most Good You Can Do develops the challenges Singer has made, in the New York Times and Washington Post, to those who donate to the arts, and to charities focused on helping our fellow citizens, rather than those for whom we can do the most good. Effective altruists are extending our knowledge of the possibilities of living less selfishly, and of allowing reason, rather than emotion, to determine how we live. The Most Good You Can Do offers new hope for our ability to tackle the world's most pressing problems.

  • Philo of Alexandria: An Intellectual Biography

    Philo was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who left behind one of the richest bodies of work from antiquity, yet his personality and intellectual development have remained a riddle. Maren Niehoff presents the first biography of Philo, arguing that his trip to Rome in 38 CE was a turning point in his life. There he was exposed not only to new political circumstances but also to a new cultural and philosophical environment.

    Following the pogrom in Alexandria, Philo became active as the head of the Jewish embassy to Emperor Gaius and as an intellectual in the capital of the empire, responding to the challenges of his time and creatively reconstructing his identity, though always maintaining pride in the Jewish tradition. Philo's trajectory from Alexandria to Rome and his enthusiastic adoption of new modes of thought made him a key figure in the complex negotiation between East and West.

  • Shapeshifting - Transformations in Native American Art

    Public perception of Native American art and culture has often been derived from misunderstandings and misinterpretations, and from images promulgated by popular culture. Typically, Native Americans are grouped as a whole and their art and culture considered part of the past rather than widely present. Shapeshifting challenges these assumptions by focusing on the objects as art rather than cultural or anthropological artifacts and on the multivalent creativity of Native American artists. The approach highlights the inventive contemporaneity that existed in all periods and continues today. More than 75 works in a wide range of media and scale are organized into four thematic groups: changing--expanding the imagination; knowing--expressing worldview; locating--exploring identity and place; and voicing--engaging the individual. The result is a paradigm shift in understanding Native American art.

  • Postcards on Parchment - The Social Lives of Medieval Books

    Medieval prayer books held not only the devotions and meditations of Christianity, but also housed, slipped between pages, sundry notes, reminders, and ephemera, such as pilgrims' badges, sworn oaths, and small painted images. Many of these last items have been classified as manuscript illumination, but Kathryn M. Rudy argues that these pictures should be called, instead, parchment paintings, similar to postcards. In a delightful study identifying this group of images for the first time, Rudy delineates how these objects functioned apart from the books in which they were kept. Whereas manuscript illuminations were designed to provide a visual narrative to accompany a book's text, parchment paintings offered a kind of autonomous currency for exchange between individuals--people who longed for saturated color in a gray world of wood, stone, and earth. These small, colorful pictures offered a brilliant reprieve, and Rudy shows how these intriguing and previously unfamiliar images were traded and cherished, shedding light into the everyday life and relationships of those in the medieval Low Countries.

  • Eternity`s Sunrise - The Imaginative World of William Blake

    In this richly illustrated portrait, a prize-winning biographer surveys the entire sweep of William Blake s creative work while telling the story of his life
    William Blake, overlooked in his time, remains an enigmatic figure to contemporary readers despite his near canonical status. Out of a wounding sense of alienation and dividedness he created a profoundly original symbolic language, in which words and images unite in a unique interpretation of self and society. He was a counterculture prophet whose art still challenges us to think afresh about almost every aspect of experience social, political, philosophical, religious, erotic, and aesthetic. He believed that we live in the midst of Eternity here and now, and that if we could open our consciousness to the fullness of being, it would be like experiencing a sunrise that never ends.
    Following Blake s life from beginning to end, acclaimed biographer Leo Damrosch draws extensively on Blake s poems, his paintings, and his etchings and engravings to offer this generously illustrated account of Blake the man and his vision of our world. The author s goal is to inspire the reader with the passion he has for his subject, achieving the imaginative response that Blake himself sought to excite. The book is an invitation to understanding and enjoyment, an invitation to appreciate Blake s imaginative world and, in so doing, to open the doors of our perception."

  • Powys - The Buildings of Wales Series

    The historic counties of Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, and Breconshire are described in this final volume of the Buildings of Wales series, expanded and revised from the first edition of 1979. Prehistoric hill-forts and standing stones, Roman encampments, Early Christian monuments, ruined castles and the enigmatic remains of early industry enhance the landscapes of this wild and beautiful region. Atmospheric medieval churches survive in quantity, together with diverse Nonconformist chapels. Vernacular traditions are represented by robust medieval cruck-framed houses, and by the manor houses and farmhouses of the Tudors and Stuarts. Other highlights include Montgomery, with its beguiling Georgian heritage, the Victorian spa at Llandrindod Wells, and Powis Castle, with its Baroque interiors and terraced gardens.


  • You Say You Want a Revolution - A Story of Information Age Politics

    This book is a unique account of the way politics has shaped the information age in America. Reed E. Hundt, chairman from 1993 to 1997 of the Federal Communications Commission, the nation's chief regulatory agency for media and communications industries, tells of the battles for political advantage that lie behind the enormous creation of wealth and social changes that are generally called the "New Economy." The central theme of the narrative is the surprising passage and fascinating implementation of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, which authorized the Federal Communications Commission to replace monopoly with competition and to guarantee access to the Internet to all Americans, including every child in every classroom.

    Depending on the leadership of his high school classmate Al Gore and finding unexpected allies in the ranks of free market ideologues, Hundt led the FCC to make the decisions that helped start a wave of entrepreneurship, which in turn has given the United States the world's leading Internet economy. As the memoir shows, every decision involved prodigious political battles--between existing industries and start-ups, between Newt Gingrich and the Clinton-Gore White House, between inside-the-Beltway lobbyists and the new grassroots advocacy of e-mails, between the politics of money and the politics of ideas. In the same period, the often ignored and historically maligned FCC was the place where government decided whether to undertake the largest national initiative to reform K-12 education in the country's history: the program to connect every classroom to the Internet by the year 2001.

    Hundt's report from the political battlefield offers significant insight into the motives and personality not only of Al Gore but other prominent figures in political life, as well as many of the media moguls of our time. Told with great energy and wit, it is a tale that inspires both concern for and confidence in our democracy in the information age.

  • William Merritt Chase: A Modern Master

    A landmark retrospective that examines William Merritt Chase and his lasting contribution to the history of modern art

    The history of modern art owes a great debt to William Merritt Chase (1849-1916), one of America's influential artists and educators. Chase was a leading member of the international artistic avant-garde and was best known for his mastery of a wide range of subjects in oil and pastel, including figures, landscapes, urban park scenes, interiors, and portraits. As a teacher and founder of the Shinnecock Summer School of Art and the New York School of Art, Chase mentored a new generation of modernists, including Edward Hopper, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Joseph Stella.

    A century after his death, the breadth and richness of Chase's career are celebrated in this beautifully illustrated publication. Five essays by prominent scholars of American art offer new insights into Chase's multi-faceted artistic practice and his position in the international cultural climate at the turn of the 20th century.

  • Baroque Naples and the Industry of Painting: The World in the Workbench

    The second largest city in 17th-century Europe, Naples constituted a vital Mediterranean center in which the Spanish Habsburgs, the clergy, and Neapolitan aristocracy, together with the resident merchants, and other members of the growing professional classes jostled for space and prestige. Their competing programs of building and patronage created a booming art market and spurred painters such as Jusepe de Ribera, Massimo Stanzione, Salvator Rosa, and Luca Giordano as well as foreign artists such as Caravaggio, Domenichino, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Giovanni Lanfranco to extraordinary heights of achievement. This new reading of 17th-century Italian Baroque art explores the social, material, and economic history of painting, revealing how artists, agents, and the owners of artworks interacted to form a complex and mutually sustaining art world. Through such topics as artistic rivalry and anti-foreign labor agitation, art dealing and forgery, cultural diplomacy, and the rise of the independently arranged art exhibition, Christopher R. Marshall illuminates the rich interconnections between artistic practice and patronage, business considerations, and the spirit of entrepreneurialism in Baroque Italy.

  • Creating the Administrative Constitution - The Lost One Hundred Years of American Administrative Law

    This groundbreaking book is the first to look at administration and administrative law in the earliest days of the American republic. Jerry Mashaw demonstrates that from the very beginning Congress delegated vast discretion to administrative officials and armed them with extrajudicial adjudicatory, rulemaking, and enforcement authority. The legislative and administrative practices of the U.S. Constitution's first century created an administrative constitution hardly hinted at in its formal text. This book, in the author's words, will "demonstrate that there has been no precipitous fall from a historical position of separation-of-powers grace to a position of compromise; there is not a new administrative constitution whose legitimacy should be understood as not only contestable but deeply problematic."

  • The World Atlas of Street Photography

    An ambitious, stunning compendium assembling vibrant, varied expressions of street photography, both staged and improvised, from around the globe

    The energetic, fluctuating pace of the metropolis has long lured photographers to capture--often candidly--the chaos, character, and incident of modern urban life ever since the genesis of photography in the 19th century. The World Atlas of Street Photography focuses on the abundance of photos created on street corners internationally, including classic documentary street photography as well as mediated images of urban landscapes, staged performances, and sculpture. Twelve specially commissioned artworks are featured, in addition to a wide selection of striking and well-known images of city life. Lively and informative, this handsome book compiles expressions of a vibrant genre and is the first of its kind to scour the globe--from New York to New Delhi, Beijing to Brighton, Havana to Hamburg, and Sydney to Seoul. This magnificently illustrated compilation of more than 700 images presents over one hundred established and emerging contemporary photographers, including Nikki S. Lee, Lise Sarfati, Jeff Wall, Daido Moriyama, Alexey Titarenko, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, David Goldblatt, and Julio Bittencourt, among many others. The World Atlas of Street Photography offers a peek through the lenses of photographers chronicling the fever, furor, and intimacy of urban life.

  • Machine Age Modernism - Prints from the Daniel Cowin Collection

    This group of 40 prints from the exceptional Daniel Cowin Collection captures the tumultuous aesthetic and political climate of the years surrounding World Wars I and II. An essay by Jonathan Black addresses the impact of World War I on two notable British printmakers, Edward Wadsworth and C. R. W. Nevinson. A text by Jay A. Clarke delves into the linocut movement of the 1920s and '30s, investigating how the role of style and politics impacted this movement as well as the previously unexplored position of women printmakers and the interplay between gender, craft, and decoration. Influences of Futurism, Cubism, and the short-lived but vibrant abstraction of the Vorticist movement saturate the powerful color images, which are accompanied by artist biographies. This publication illuminates the struggle of these radical printmakers as they navigated a conservative market and the harsh economic and political realities of their time.

  • Innovation Economics - The Race for Global Advantage

    This important book delivers a critical wake-up call: a fierce global race for innovation advantage is under way, and while other nations are making support for technology and innovation a central tenet of their economic strategies and policies, America lacks a robust innovation policy. What does this portend? Robert Atkinson and Stephen Ezell, widely respected economic thinkers, report on profound new forces that are shaping the global economy-forces that favor nations with innovation-based economies and innovation policies. Unless the United States enacts public policies to reflect this reality, Americans face the relatively lower standards of living associated with a noncompetitive national economy. The authors explore how a weak innovation economy not only contributed to the Great Recession but is delaying America's recovery from it and how innovation in the United States compares with that in other developed and developing nations. Atkinson and Ezell then lay out a detailed, pragmatic road map for America to regain its global innovation advantage by 2020, as well as maximize the global supply of innovation and promote sustainable globalization.

  • The Anglo-Florentine Renaissance - Art for the Early Tudors

    Under the rule of Henry VII (r. 1485-1509) England became a powerful nation. The Tudor court sought to express its worldliness and political weight through major artistic commissions, employing Florentine sculptors and painters to create lavish new interiors, suitable for entertaining foreign dignitaries, for its royal palaces. These were exemplified by Henry VIII's palace of Nonsuch, so named because no other palace could match its magnificence. Italian sculpture, painting, and tapestries of the day reflected an interest in portraiture and dynastic monuments, epitomized in England by the royal tomb projects created by Baccio Bandinelli, Benedetto da Rovezzano, and Pietro Torrigiani. Generously illustrated throughout, 'The Anglo-Florentine Renaissance' traces the artistic links between Medicean Florence and Tudor England through essays by an international team of scholars, and explores how the language of Florentine art effectively expressed Tudor political aspirations and rose to prominence as a new international courtly style.

  • Corporations Are People Too: And They Should Act Like It

    Why we're better off treating corporations as people under the law--and making them behave like citizens

    Are corporations people? The U.S. Supreme Court launched a heated debate when it ruled in Citizens United that corporations can claim the same free speech rights as humans. Should they be able to claim rights of free speech, religious conscience, and due process? Kent Greenfield provides an answer: Sometimes.

    With an analysis sure to challenge the assumptions of both progressives and conservatives, Greenfield explores corporations' claims to constitutional rights and the foundational conflicts about their obligations in society and concludes that a blanket opposition to corporate personhood is misguided, since it is consistent with both the purpose of corporations and the Constitution itself that corporations can claim rights at least some of the time. The problem with Citizens United is not that corporations have a right to speak, but for whom they speak. The solution is not to end corporate personhood but to require corporations to act more like citizens.

  • The South China Sea - The Struggle for Power in Asia

    China's rise has upset the global balance of power, and the first place to feel the strain is Beijing's backyard: the South China Sea. For decades tensions have smouldered in the region, but today the threat of a direct confrontation among superpowers grows ever more likely. This important book is the first to make clear sense of the South Sea disputes. Bill Hayton, a journalist with extensive experience in the region, examines the high stakes involved for rival nations that include Vietnam, India, Taiwan, the Philippines, and China, as well as the United States, Russia and others. Hayton also lays out the daunting obstacles that stand in the way of peaceful resolution. Through lively stories of individuals who have shaped current conflicts - businessmen, scientists, shippers, archaeologists, soldiers, diplomats - Hayton makes understandable the complex history and contemporary reality of the South China Sea. He underscores its crucial importance as the passageway for half the world's merchant shipping and one third of its oil and gas. Whoever controls these waters controls the access between Europe, the Middle East, South Asia, and the Pacific. The author critiques various claims and positions (that China has historic claim to the Sea, for example), overturns conventional wisdom (such as America's overblown fears of China's nationalism and military resurgence), and outlines what the future may hold for this clamorous region of international rivalry.

  • Susan Sontag - The Complete Rolling Stone Interview

    "One of my oldest crusades is against the distinction between thought and feeling, which is really the basis of all anti-intellectual views: the heart and the head, thinking and feeling, fantasy and judgment ...and I don't believe it's true...I have the impression that thinking is a form of feeling and that feeling is a form of thinking." Susan Sontag, one of the most internationally renowned and controversial intellectuals of the latter half of the twentieth century, still provokes. In 1978 Jonathan Cott, a founding contributing editor of Rolling Stone magazine, interviewed Sontag first in Paris and later in New York. Only a third of their twelve hours of discussion ever made it to print. Now, more than three decades later, Yale University Press is proud to publish the entire transcript of Sontag's remarkable conversation, accompanied by Cott's preface and recollections. Sontag's musings and observations reveal the passionate engagement and breadth of her critical intelligence and curiosities at a moment when she was at the peak of her powers. Nearly a decade after her death, these hours of conversation offer a revelatory and indispensable look at the self-described "besotted aesthete" and "obsessed moralist." "I really believe in history, and that's something people don't believe in anymore. I know that what we do and think is a historical creation...We were given a vocabulary that came into existence at a particular moment. So when I go to a Patti Smith concert, I enjoy, participate, appreciate, and am tuned in better because I've read Nietzsche." "There's no incompatibility between observing the world and being tuned into this electronic, multimedia, multi-tracked, McLuhanite world and enjoying what can be enjoyed. I love rock and roll. Rock and roll changed my life...You know, to tell you the truth, I think rock and roll is the reason I got divorced. I think it was Bill Haley and the Comets and Chuck Berry that made me decide that I had to get a divorce and leave the academic world and start a new life."

  • Judith Neisser Collection - Minimal and Postminimal Innovation

    One of Chicago's premier art patrons and an architecture and interior design critic, Judith Neisser has amassed a remarkable collection of international contemporary art. More than 100 works are presented in this captivating, inside look at the Neisser family collection, highlighting paintings, sculpture, and works on paper from the 1960s to the present. Special emphasis is given to Minimalism and Conceptualism, most notably objects by Sol LeWitt, Robert Ryman, Donald Judd, Brice Marden, and Blinky Palermo. Other artists practicing in distinct traditions, such as Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, and Rudolf Stingel, have been wonderfully integrated into the collection based on shared themes such as seriality, the monochrome, reductive geometric forms, and the grid. Included in this generously illustrated book is an in-depth interview with Neisser about her distinctive collection.

  • The Neo-Impressionist Portrait, 1886-1904

    Neo-Impressionism, the style pioneered by Georges Seurat (1859-1891), has long been associated with exquisite landscapes and intriguing scenes of urban leisure. Yet the movement's use of dotted brushwork and color theory also produced arresting portraits of unusual beauty and perception. The Neo-Impressionist Portrait is the first book to examine the astonishing portraits produced by the most important figures of Neo-Impressionism, including Seurat himself, Henri-Edmond Cross, Georges Lemmen, Maximilien Luce, Paul Signac, Henry van de Velde, Vincent van Gogh, and Theo van Rysselberghe. Essays by esteemed scholar Jane Block detail the emergence of portraiture as a genre within the Neo-Impressionist movement, first in France and then in Belgium, as well as the continuing artistic dialogues between the regions. More than one hundred color illustrations, biographies of seventeen Neo-Impressionist artists, and a catalogue of sixty paintings make up this authoritative book on a key chapter of the Post-Impressionist era.

  • Strange Eggs - Poems and Cutouts, 1956-58

    In 1957-58, after he moved to New York's Lower East Side, Claes Oldenburg (b. 1929) began making collages he has described as "mostly done in an uncontrolled and intuitive dream mode." Made from found, printed imagery, the Strange Eggs are enigmatic, surrealistic, and vastly different from the Pop art of the 1960s for which he soon became famous.

    These collages are characterized by self-contained forms, or "eggs," the artist made by melding cut fragments of photographic illustrations. While many of the pieces are unrecognizable, some original references are discernible: a piece of pie, the hind leg of a horse, the creased skin of a clenched fist, and the texture of concrete. These eighteen collages were first shown at the Menil Collection in 2012, and they are being published together for the first time, along with poems that the artist wrote at the same time based on found imagery from his walks around New York's Lower East Side. Anticipating second-generation New York School art-poetry collaborations by half a decade, Strange Eggs makes an important single-artist contribution to our understanding of the period.


  • A Little History of Religion

    For curious readers young and old, a rich and colorful history of religion from humanity's earliest days to our own contentious times

    In an era of hardening religious attitudes and explosive religious violence, this book offers a welcome antidote. Richard Holloway retells the entire history of religion--from the dawn of religious belief to the twenty-first century--with deepest respect and a keen commitment to accuracy. Writing for those with faith and those without, and especially for young readers, he encourages curiosity and tolerance, accentuates nuance and mystery, and calmly restores a sense of the value of faith.

    Ranging far beyond the major world religions of Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, and Hinduism, Holloway also examines where religious belief comes from, the search for meaning throughout history, today's fascinations with Scientology and creationism, religiously motivated violence, hostilities between religious people and secularists, and more. Holloway proves an empathic yet discerning guide to the enduring significance of faith and its power from ancient times to our own.

  • The Computer and the Brain 3e

    In this classic work, one of the greatest mathematicians of the twentieth century explores the analogies between computing machines and the living human brain. John von Neumann, whose many contributions to science, mathematics, and engineering include the basic organizational framework at the heart of today's computers, concludes that the brain operates both digitally and analogically, but also has its own peculiar statistical language.

    In his foreword to this new edition, Ray Kurzweil, a futurist famous in part for his own reflections on the relationship between technology and intelligence, places von Neumann's work in a historical context and shows how it remains relevant today.

  • Why Architecture Matters

    Now in paperback after five printings, a remarkable journey through the built world from the Pulitzer Prize-winning New Yorker critic and "America's foremost interpreter of public architecture" (Tracy Kidder)

    Why Architecture Matters is not a work of architectural history or a guide to the styles or an architectural dictionary, though it contains elements of all three. The purpose of Why Architecture Matters is to "come to grips with how things feel to us when we stand before them, with how architecture affects us emotionally as well as intellectually"--with its impact on our lives. "Architecture begins to matter," writes Paul Goldberger, "when it brings delight and sadness and perplexity and awe along with a roof over our heads." He shows us how that works in examples ranging from a small Cape Cod cottage to the "vast, flowing" Prairie houses of Frank Lloyd Wright, from the Lincoln Memorial to the highly sculptural Guggenheim Bilbao and the Church of Sant'Ivo in Rome, where "simple geometries . . . create a work of architecture that embraces the deepest complexities of human imagination."

    Based on decades of looking at buildings and thinking about how we experience them, the distinguished critic raises our awareness of fundamental things like proportion, scale, space, texture, materials, shapes, light, and memory. Upon completing this remarkable architectural journey, readers will enjoy a wonderfully rewarding new way of seeing and experiencing every aspect of the built world.

  • Artists and Amateurs - Etching in Eighteenth-Century France

    Over the course of the 18th century a great number of artists, ranging from established painters and sculptors to amateurs, experimented with etching, an accessible form of printmaking akin to drawing. In a period when artists strained to navigate the highly regulated Academie Royale and the increasingly discordant public spheres of the marketplace and the Salon, etching afforded them stylistic freedom and allowed them to produce exquisite works of art in a spirit of collaboration and experimentation.

    Featuring works by Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Hubert Robert, and many others, Artists and Amateurs embarks on a fresh exploration of how etching flourished in ancien regime France, shedding new light on artistic practice and patronage at that time. Treating such topics as technique and practice, experimentation, and the crucial role of the amateur, it establishes the unique place of etching in the shifting social terrain of 18th-century Paris, and explores an artistic context in which conventional hierarchies of genre and medium were breached to brilliant effect.

  • Schiaparelli and Prada - Impossible Conversations

    Although separated by time, Miuccia Prada and Elsa Schiaparelli--both Italian, both feminists--share striking affinities in terms of their design strategies and fashion manifestoes. Presented as an intimate "conversation," Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations aims to tease out formal and conceptual similarities between the two designers. Striking photographs and insightful texts illustrate the parallels between the two, including their preferences for interesting textiles and prints, eccentric color palettes, and a bold and playful approach to styling and accessories.

    Schiaparelli, in the 1920s through 50s, and Prada, from the late 1980s to today, exploited the narrative possibilities of prints, sought out unconventional textiles, played with ideas of good and bad taste, and manipulated scale for surrealistic outcomes. Contemporary art plays a major role in the work of these inventive women--Schiaparelli in her famous collaborations with Dali and Cocteau, and Prada via her Fondazione Prada. Blending the historic with the contemporary, the catalogue brings the masterworks of both designers together into a grand conversation between the most important women fashion designers to ever emerge from Italy.

  • The Hatred of Music

    How does a man who once adored music beyond measure come to revile it as a form of tyranny?

    Throughout Pascal Quignard's distinguished literary career, music has been a recurring obsession. As a musician he organized the International Festival of Baroque Opera and Theatre at Versailles in the early 1990s, and thus was instrumental in the rediscovery of much forgotten classical music. Yet in 1994 he abruptly renounced all musical activities. The Hatred of Music is Quignard's masterful exploration of the power of music and what history reveals about the dangers it poses.

    From prehistoric chants to challenging contemporary compositions, Quignard reflects on music of all kinds and eras. He draws on vast cultural knowledge--the Bible, Greek mythology, early modern history, modern philosophy, the Holocaust, and more--to develop ten accessible treatises on music. In each of these small masterpieces the author exposes music's potential to manipulate, to mesmerize, to domesticate. Especially disturbing is his scrutiny of the role music played in the concentration camps of Nazi Germany. Quignard's provocative book takes on particular relevance today, as we find ourselves surrounded by music as never before in history.

  • Elementary Particles

    First published in 1951, Enrico Fermi's Elementary Particles remains a valuable guide for physicists and scholars. Fermi's descriptions of the then-known particle universe and its nascent conceptual framework allow readers to glimpse the foundations of the field from the perspective of one of its most distinguished contributors.

    Over sixty years of research have provided answers to some of the questions Fermi poses in this book, but the biggest mysteries, regarding the origin and unification of forces, remain. As the high-energy physics community analyzes the results from ongoing experiments, such as those at the Large Hadron Collider, this historic work will be of interest to researchers, academics, and students. A new foreword by Yale University physicist Thomas Appelquist provides an engaging update and gives the work historical context.

  • Master Paintings in the Art Institute of Chicago

    A key destination for any art admirer, the Art Institute of Chicago houses an extraordinary collection of master paintings. Within the covers of this beautiful book, updated to include some recent acquisitions and a new preface by director Douglas Druick, the reader finds an amazing selection of European and American paintings dating from the Renaissance to the present day. Included are singular works by Rembrandt, Rubens, and El Greco; Cassatt, Homer, and J.M.W. Whistler; Degas, Monet, Caillebotte, and Seurat; Picasso, Lichtenstein, Richter, and Twombly.

  • Survey of London - Battersea - V49 - Public, Commercial and Cultural

    The south London parish of Battersea has roots as a working village, growing produce for London markets, and as a high-class suburb, with merchants' villas on the elevated ground around Clapham and Wadsworth Commons. Battersea enjoyed spectacular growth during Queen Victoria's reign, and railroads brought industry and a robust building boom, transforming the parish into another of London's dense, smoky neighborhoods, though not without its unique and distinguishing features. Among these are Battersea Park, which was created by the Crown in the 1850s; the monumental Battersea Power Station, completed in 1939; and Clapham Junction railway station, which is, by measure of passenger interchanges, the busiest station in the United Kingdom.

    The two latest volumes of the Survey of London, 49 and 50, trace Battersea's development from medieval times to the present day. Offering detailed analysis of its streets and buildings both thematically and topographically, and including copious original in-depth research and investigation, the books are a trove of architectural history and British history. Profusely illustrated with new and archival images, architectural drawings and maps, these volumes are welcome additions to the acclaimed Survey of London series.

  • Boredom - A Lively History

    A rich and stimulating exploration of one of our most maligned emotions and how it might actually help us flourish

    In the first book to argue for the benefits of boredom, Peter Toohey dispels the myth that it's simply a childish emotion or an existential malaise like Jean-Paul Sartre's nausea. He shows how boredom is, in fact, one of our most common and constructive emotions and is an essential part of the human experience.

    This informative and entertaining investigation of boredom--what it is and what it isn't, its uses and its dangers--spans more than 3,000 years of history and takes readers through fascinating neurological and psychological theories of emotion, as well as recent scientific investigations, to illustrate its role in our lives. There are Australian aboriginals and bored Romans, Jeffrey Archer and caged cockatoos, Camus and the early Christians, Durer and Degas. Toohey also explores the important role that boredom plays in popular and highbrow culture and how over the centuries it has proven to be a stimulus for art and literature.

    Toohey shows that boredom is a universal emotion experienced by humans throughout history and he explains its place, and value, in today's world. Boredom: A Lively History is vital reading for anyone interested in what goes on when supposedly nothing happens.

  • Nation of Devils - Democracy and the Problem of Obedience

    Oxford University political theorist Stein Ringen offers a thought-provoking meditation on the art of democratic rule: how does a government persuade the people to accept its authority? Every government must make unpopular demands of its citizens, from levying taxes to enforcing laws and monitoring compliance to regulations. The challenge, Ringen argues, is that power is not enough; the populace must also be willing to be led. Ringen addresses this political conundrum unabashedly, using the United States and Britain as his prime examples, providing sharp opinions and cogent analyses on how the culture of national obedience is created and nurtured. He explores the paths leaders must choose if they wish to govern by authority rather than power, or, as the philosopher Immanuel Kant put it, to "maintain order in a nation of devils".

  • For A Love of His People - The Photography of Horace Poolaw

    For more than five decades of the twentieth century, one of the first American Indian professional photographers gave an insider's view of his Oklahoma community--a community rooted in its traditional culture while also thoroughly modern and quintessentially American

    Horace Poolaw (Kiowa, 1906-84) was born during a time of great change for his American Indian people as they balanced age-old traditions with the influences of mainstream America. A rare American Indian photographer who documented Indian subjects, Poolaw began making a visual history in the mid-1920s and continued for the next fifty years. When he sold his photos, he often stamped the reverse: "A Poolaw Photo, Pictures by an Indian, Horace M. Poolaw, Anadarko, Okla." Not simply by "an Indian," but by a Kiowa man strongly rooted in his multi-tribal community, Poolaw's work celebrates his subjects' place in American life and preserves an insider's perspective on a world few outsiders are familiar with--the Native America of the southern plains during the mid-twentieth century.

    For a Love of His People: The Photography of Horace Poolaw is based on the Poolaw Photography Project, a research initiative established by Poolaw's daughter Linda in 1989 at Stanford University and carried on by Native scholars Nancy Marie Mithlo (Chiricahua Apache) and Tom Jones (Ho-Chunk) of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • Charles James - Beyond Fashion

    "His work went beyond fashion and was a fine art." --a Charles James patron

    Charles James, often considered to be America's first couturier, was renowned in the 1940s and 1950s as a master at sculpting fabric for the female form and creating fashions that defined mid-century glamour. Although James had no formal training as a dressmaker, he created strikingly original and complex designs, including intricate ball gowns worn by members of high society in New York and Europe. This lavishly illustrated book offers a comprehensive study of James' life and work, highlighting his virtuosity and inventiveness as well as his influence on subsequent fashion designers.

    Featuring exciting new photography of the spectacular evening dresses James produced between 1947 and 1955, this publication includes enlightening details of these intricate creations alongside vintage photographs and rarely seen archival items, such as patterns, muslins, dress forms, and sketches. A detailed and illustrated chronology of James' life describes his magnetic personality, his unorthodox design processes, his colorful supporters--such as Salvador Dali, Elsa Schiaparelli, Christian Dior, and Cristobal Balenciaga--and profiles of a number of his famous clients, such as Gypsy Rose Lee. With flair and style echoing that of its subject, Charles James brings to life one of the most fascinating and creative figures in American fashion.

  • American Lynching

    After observing the varying reactions to the 1998 death of James Byrd Jr. in Texas, called a lynching by some, denied by others, Ashraf Rushdy determined that to comprehend this event he needed to understand the long history of lynching in the United States. In this meticulously researched and accessibly written interpretive history, Rushdy shows how lynching in America has endured, evolved, and changed in meaning over the course of three centuries, from its origins in early Virginia to the present day. Rushdy argues that we can understand what lynching means in American history by examining its evolution-that is, by seeing how the practice changes in both form and meaning over the course of three centuries, by analyzing the rationales its advocates have made in its defense, and, finally, by explicating its origins. The best way of understanding what lynching has meant in different times, and for different populations, during the course of American history is by seeing both the continuities in the practice over time and the specific features in different forms of lynching in different eras.

  • Exposed - A History of Lingerie

    Lingerie is a subject of enduring fascination. As the final barrier to the fully nude body, it is simultaneously modest and erotic. This compelling and eye catching publication surveys lingerie from the mid 18th century to the present, covering a broad range of foundation garments, intimate apparel, and lounging clothes - from bras and corsets to slips, peignoirs, and tea gowns. All pieces are gorgeously illustrated in full colour. Stunning historical garments from well known fashion houses such as Christian Dior are included, as is risque contemporary lingerie by labels such as Agent Provocateur. When viewed as a whole, these pieces illustrate important developments in fashion over time, such as changes in silhouette, shifting ideals of propriety, and advancements in technology. While a number of the pieces featured in the book were worn hundreds of years ago, the majority date from the twentieth century. It was at that time that lingerie started to become as beautiful and alluring as it was functional. Authors Colleen Hill and Valerie Steele will show that the decorative, highly feminine styles from the early 1900s set a new precedent for the importance of lingerie in women's private lives - a concept that remains important to many women today.

  • Matisse - In Search of True Painting

    More than most artists, Henri Matisse conducted an ongoing dialogue with his earlier works, continually questioning himself and his methods in order to, as he put it, push further and deeper into true painting. This book examines sixty works and more than five decades in a series of chapters by Matisse scholars from the United States and Europe.

  • Earthmasters - The Dawn of the Age of Climate Engineering

    An essential book that comes to grips with the events that will determine the fate of the Earth

    This book goes to the heart of the unfolding reality of the twenty-first century: international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions have all failed, and before the end of the century Earth is projected to be warmer than it has been for 15 million years. The question "can the crisis be avoided?" has been superseded by a more frightening one, "what can be done to prevent the devastation of the living world?" And the disturbing answer, now under wide discussion both within and outside the scientific community, is to seize control of the very climate of the Earth itself. Clive Hamilton begins by exploring the range of technologies now being developed in the field of geoengineering--the intentional, enduring, large-scale manipulation of Earth's climate system. He lays out the arguments for and against climate engineering, and reveals the extent of vested interests linking researchers, venture capitalists, and corporations. He then examines what it means for human beings to be making plans to control the planet's atmosphere, probes the uneasiness we feel with the notion of exercising technological mastery over nature, and challenges the ways we think about ourselves and our place in the natural world.

  • Martin Puryear - Multiple Dimensions

    A fascinating glimpse into the creative process of a major contemporary sculptor, featuring many previously unseen works on paper

    American sculptor Martin Puryear (b. 1941) creates work that combines the clean elegance of minimalism and the simplicity of traditional materials. His stunning sculptures explore themes of identity, ethnicity, and history, and are rich with social and cultural commentary. Puryear, who is known for abstract, large-scale pieces in wood, stone, and bronze, has captured the attention of the art world for the past 30 years. Despite the apparent simplicity of his works, however, he engages in an extensive iterative process that has, until now, been unknown.

    Martin Puryear: Multiple Dimensions explores that process, featuring numerous drawings, prints, and small-scale sculptures that have never before been published. This catalogue is the first to examine Puryear's work across media, providing invaluable insight into his visual thinking, from sketches to working drawings and constructions for sculpture. Handsomely illustrated with nearly 120 color plates that demonstrate the evolution of Puryear's ideas between drawings, prints, and sculptures, this beautiful volume draws back the curtain on the methodology of this important and enigmatic artist.

  • Europe′s Deadlock - How the Euro Crisis Could be Solved - And why it won′t Happen

    In this short yet devastating analysis, David Marsh asks why five years of continuous crisis management have not only failed to resolve the Eurozone's problems but actually made things worse. Marsh argues that constructive dialogue has collapsed as EU decision-making descends into a state of terrified paralysis, and that although there are potential paths out of the impasse, all are blocked by indecision and timidity at the top.

  • Rush to Gold - France, the French, and the California Gold Rush, 1848-1854

    The California Gold Rush began in 1848 and incited many "wagons west." However, only half of the 300,000 gold seekers traveled by land. The other half traveled by sea. And it's the story of this second group that interests Malcolm Rohrbough in his authoritative new book, The Rush to Gold. He examines the California Gold Rush through the eyes of 30,000 French participants. In so doing, he offers a completely original analysis of an important--but previously neglected--chapter in the history of the Gold Rush, which occurred at a time of sweeping changes in France. Rohrbough is the author of Days of Gold, which is generally accepted as the essential text on the subject. This new book comes out of his extended research in French archives. He is the first to provide an international focus to these pivotal events in mid-nineteenth-century America. The Rush to Gold is an important contribution to the fast-growing field of transnational American history.

  • Giving Voice to Values - How to Speak Your Mind When You Know What′s Right

    An innovative approach to standing up for your values in the workplace--inspired by a popular program from the Aspen Institute

    How can you effectively stand up for your values when pressured by your boss, customers, or shareholders to do the opposite? Drawing on actual business experiences as well as on social science research, Babson College business educator and consultant Mary Gentile challenges the assumptions about business ethics at companies and business schools. She gives business leaders, managers, and students the tools not just to recognize what is right, but also to ensure that the right things happen. The book is inspired by a program Gentile launched at the Aspen Institute with Yale School of Management, and now housed at Babson College, with pilot programs in over one hundred schools and organizations, including INSEAD and MIT Sloan School of Management.

    She explains why past attempts at preparing business leaders to act ethically too often failed, arguing that the issue isn't distinguishing what is right or wrong, but knowing how to act on your values despite opposing pressure. Through research-based advice, practical exercises, and scripts for handling a wide range of ethical dilemmas, Gentile empowers business leaders with the skills to voice and act on their values, and align their professional path with their principles. Giving Voice to Values is an engaging, innovative, and useful guide that is essential reading for anyone in business.

  • Second Simplicity - New Poetry and Prose, 1991-2011

    An eagerly awaited anthology of recent poetry and prose by the celebrated French poet Yves Bonnefoy

    Yves Bonnefoy, who will soon attain the age of ninety, has gratified his readers during the past two decades with the most prolific and innovative period of his splendid lifework. This volume presents in English and French an inviting array of his recent writings, carefully selected for their literary quality as well as their broad appeal. It features several works never published before and many that have never been translated into English. The first anthology of Bonnefoy's work to appear since 1995, this collection reflects the poet's powerful engagement with the New England landscape; its quiet woods and fields have helped to shape to the pared-down aesthetic of his recent years. The book is the first to showcase not only the poetry for which Bonnefoy is justly renowned but also his inventive compositions in prose. Appropriately, the book alternates more traditional verse with freer forms, just as the author has done in several major works of the past twenty years; that symbiotic approach is one of the hallmarks of this latter phase of his art. Superbly translated by Hoyt Rogers, the collection is organized chronologically, revealing clearly how the poet continues to extend and refine his scope and style. Rogers provides a masterly introduction in which he analyzes aspects of Bonnefoy's recent writings and the "second simplicity" that characterizes his late work.

  • Of Africa

    A Nobel laureate offers a keen, thought-provoking analysis of Africa's current crises and points the way to cultural and political renewal

    A member of the unique generation of African writers and intellectuals who came of age in the last days of colonialism, Wole Soyinka has witnessed the promise of independence and lived through postcolonial failure. He deeply comprehends the pressing problems of Africa, and, an irrepressible essayist and a staunch critic of the oppressive boot, he unhesitatingly speaks out.

    In this magnificent new work, Soyinka offers a wide-ranging inquiry into Africa's culture, religion, history, imagination, and identity. He seeks to understand how the continent's history is entwined with the histories of others, while exploring Africa's truest assets: "its humanity, the quality and valuation of its own existence, and modes of managing its environment--both physical and intangible (which includes the spiritual)."

    Fully grasping the extent of Africa's most challenging issues, Soyinka nevertheless refuses defeatism. With eloquence he analyzes problems ranging from the meaning of the past to the threat of theocracy. He asks hard questions about racial attitudes, inter-ethnic and religious violence, the viability of nations whose boundaries were laid out by outsiders, African identity on the continent and among displaced Africans, and more. Soyinka's exploration of Africa relocates the continent in the reader's imagination and maps a course toward an African future of peace and affirmation.

  • Immortality and the Law

    This book takes a riveting look at how the law responds to that distinctly American dream of immortality. While American law provides virtually no protections for the interests we hold most dear--our bodies and our reputations--when it comes to property interests, the American dead have greater control than anywhere else in the world. Moreover, these rights are growing daily. From grave robbery to Elvis impersonators, Madoff shows how the law of the dead has a direct impact on how we live. Madoff examines how the rising power of the American dead enables the deceased to exert control over their wealth forever through grandiose schemes like "dynasty trusts" and perpetual private charitable foundations and to control their creative works and identities well into the unforeseeable future. Madoff explores how the law of the dead can, in essence, extend the reach of life by granting virtual immortality to individuals. All of this comes, Madoff contends, at real costs imposed on the living.

  • Queens and Mistresses of Remaissance France

    This book tells the history of the French Renaissance through the lives of its most prominent queens and mistresses, beginning with Agnes Sorel, the first officially recognized royal mistress in 1444; including Anne of Brittany, Catherine de Medici, Anne Pisseleu, Diane de Poitiers, and Marguerite de Valois, among others; and concluding with Gabrielle d'Estrees, Henry IV's powerful mistress during the 1590s.

    Wellman shows that women in both roles--queen and mistress--enjoyed great influence over French politics and culture, not to mention over the powerful men with whom they were involved. The book also addresses the enduring mythology surrounding these women, relating captivating tales that uncover much about Renaissance modes of argument, symbols, and values, as well as our own modern preoccupations.

  • Richard Serra Drawing - A Retrospective

    As the focal point of numerous high-profile exhibitions, the sculpture of Richard Serra (b. 1939) has drawn international acclaim. Yet even those who have marveled at Serra's intellectually rigorous and large works of sculpture may not be familiar with his equally intriguing drawings. This handsome book brings together for the first time Serra's drawn work, considering the artist's investigation of medium as an activity both independent from and linked to his pioneering sculptural practice.

    First working in ink, charcoal, and lithographic crayon on paper, Serra originally used drawing as a means to explore form and perceptual relations between his sculpture and the viewer. Over time, his drawings underwent significant shifts in concept, materials, and scale and became fully realized and autonomous works of art. The grand, bold forms he created with black paintstick in his monumental Installation Drawings were designed to disrupt and complement existent spaces and eventually began to occupy entire rooms. In the late 1980s, Serra explored the tension of weight and gravity through layering, and his most recent work experiments with surface effects, using mesh screens as intermediaries between the gesture and the transfer of pigment to paper.

  • Whitney Museum of American Art - Handbook of the Collection

    An exciting guide to, and celebration of, the Whitney Museum and its outstanding collection of American art

    This all-new handbook, a fresh look at the Whitney Museum of American Art's collection, highlights the museum's extraordinary holdings and its fascinating history. Featuring iconic pieces by artists such as Calder, Hopper, Johns, O'Keeffe, and Warhol--as well as numerous works by under-recognized individuals--this is not only a guide to the Whitney's collection, but also a remarkable primer on modern and contemporary American art.

    Beautifully illustrated with abundant new photography, the book pairs scholarly entries on 350 artists with images of some of their most significant works. The museum's history and the evolution of its collection, including the Whitney's important distinction as one of the few American museums founded by an artist, and the notion of "American" in relation to the collection, are covered in two short essays. Published to coincide with the Whitney's highly anticipated move to a new facility in downtown New York in the spring of 2015, this book celebrates the museum's storied past and vibrant present as it looks ahead to its future.

  • Exploring Happiness - From Aristotle to Brain Science

    From the acclaimed author of Lying, a brilliant exploration of happiness set in the context of the world's great philosophers, leaders, writers, and artists

    In this smart and timely book, the distinguished moral philosopher Sissela Bok ponders the nature of happiness and its place in philosophical thinking and writing throughout the ages. With nuance and elegance, Bok explores notions of happiness--from Greek philosophers to Desmond Tutu, Charles Darwin, Iris Murdoch, and the Dalai Lama--as well as the latest theories advanced by psychologists, economists, geneticists, and neuroscientists. Eschewing abstract theorizing, Bok weaves in a wealth of firsthand observations about happiness from ordinary people as well as renowned figures. This may well be the most complete picture of happiness yet.

    This book is also a clarion call to think clearly and sensitively about happiness. Bringing together very different disciplines provides Bok with a unique opportunity to consider the role of happiness in wider questions of how we should lead our lives and treat one another--concerns that don't often figure in today's happiness equation. How should we pursue, weigh, value, or limit our own happiness, or that of others, now and in the future? Compelling and perceptive, Exploring Happiness shines a welcome new light on the heart of the human condition.

  • Roman Woodworking

    This book presents an authoritative and detailed survey of the art of woodworking in the ancient Roman world. Illustrated with over 200 line drawings and photographs, Roman Woodworking covers topics such as the training and guild memberships of Roman carpenters, woodworking tools and techniques, the role of timber in construction and the availability of trees, and interior woodwork and furniture making. It also includes an extensive glossary of fully defined terms.
    This comprehensive book displays the accomplishment of the Roman woodworkers and their high skill and knowledge of materials and tools. Ulrich helps bring to light the importance of wooden projects and structures in Roman daily life and provides a wealth of information not only for classicists but also for those interested in the history of technology and the history of woodworking.

  • Defying Empire - Trading with the Enemy in Colonial New York

    This enthralling book is the first to uncover the story of New York City merchants who engaged in forbidden trade with the enemy before and during the Seven Years' War (also known as the French and Indian War). Ignoring British prohibitions designed to end North America's wartime trade with the French, New York's merchant elite conducted a thriving business in the French West Indies, insisting that their behaviour was protected by long practice and British commercial law. But the government in London viewed it as treachery, and its subsequent efforts to discipline North American commerce inflamed the colonists. Through fast-moving events and unforgettable characters, historian Thomas Truxes brings eighteenth-century New York and the Atlantic world to life. There are spies, street riots, exotic settings, informers, courtroom dramas, interdictions on the high seas, ruthless businessmen, political intrigues, and more. The author traces each phase of the city's trade with the enemy and details the frustrations that affected both British officials and independent-minded New Yorkers. The first book to focus on New York City during the Seven Years' War, 'Defying Empire' reveals the important role the city played in hastening the colonies' march toward revolution.

  • Nietzsche & Wagner - A Lesson in Subjugation

    This book presents an absorbing account of the bizarre and fluctuating relationship between the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, the composer Richard Wagner, and his wife Cosima. Nietzsche was 25 when he first met Wagner and his 32-year-old mistress Cosima (daughter of Franz Liszt and at that time wife of the conductor Hans von Bulow) in May 1869. The relationship survived on a combination of mutual intellectual admiration--dominated by the bullying Wagner--and erotic jealousy until the composer's death in 1883 and the philosopher's own descent into madness six years later.
    The book, first published in German in 1996, brings this turbulent relationship vividly to life. Joachim Kohler shows for the first time how their traumatized childhoods bound Nietzsche and Cosima in submission to the demonic, aging Wagner, how Nietzsche was enticed into the Bayreuth labyrinth, entrapped in its culture wars and used as a tool in its sectarianism and antisemitism. The book sheds new light on Nietzsche's early writings, revealing them subverted by Wagner to parade his own ideas of German superiority, of the domination of the masses by a few chosen geniuses, and of the supremacy of art and aesthetics over morals and humanity. The sources of Nietzsche's "Superman" and "Will to Power" are traced to the pre-fascist ideology of Richard and Cosima Wagner, an ideology later uncomprehendingly idolized by Hitler's Reich.

  • What′s Next - A View from the World′s Leading Economists

    The world spins in economic turmoil, and who can tell what will happen next? Cold numbers and simple statistical projections don't take into account social, financial, or political factors that can dramatically alter the economic course of a nation or a region. In this unique book, more than twenty leading economists and experts render thorough, rigorously researched prognoses for the world's major economies over the next five years. Factoring in such varied issues as the price of oil, the strength of the U.S. dollar, geopolitics, tax policies, and new developments in investment decision making, the contributors ground their predictions in the realities of current events, political conditions, and the health of financial institutions in each national economy.

    The most comprehensive volume on the global economy available today, this book presents up-to-date research on Russia, Australia, Europe, sub-Saharan and South Africa, the major Asian economies, North America, and the largest economies of Latin America. With unsurpassed expertise, the authors explain what's going on in individual countries, how important current global issues will impact them, and what economic scenarios they most likely will face in upcoming years.

  • Baby Ikki at the Museum

    Michael Smith (b. 1951) is known for his groundbreaking work in performance art as well as his immersive mixed media installations. Since 1979, the majority of his work has centered on his extraordinarily prescient and sympathetic character, Mike. Smith's other recurring performance persona is Baby Ikki, whose bizarre and precipitous infancy is marked by conspicuous facial hair, oversized diapers, and undersized sunglasses.

    Formatted and designed like a children's board book, Baby Ikki at the Museum features the eighteen-month-old character posing in front of works of art in the Whitney Museum of American Art. He acts as a wide-eyed explorer wandering in a new world, examining and responding to works in the Museum's collection by pointing, staring, or offering quizzical looks. Lacking judgment, consideration, and caution, Baby Ikki possesses an abundance of curiosity and has an insatiable appetite for attention, even when posing with priceless works of art. Providing an entirely new angle from which to view a premier art institution, the photographs in this book are at times comedic and at others unsettling for their irreverence and perceptiveness.

  • Angels and Monsters - Male and Female Sopranos in the Story of Opera, 1600-1900

    During its first two centuries, opera was dominated by sopranos. There were male sopranos, or castrati, whose supercharged voices (female vocal cords powered by male lungs) were capable of feats of vocalism that are hard to imagine today. And there were female sopranos, or prima donnas, whose long battle for social acceptance and top billing was crowned in the early nineteenth century when the castrati disappeared from the opera stage and left them supreme. Whether they were male or female, these singers were amazing virtuosi, perhaps the greatest singers there have ever been-"angels." Unfortunately, some of them (and often the most famous) were also capable of behaving extremely badly, both on and off stage-"monsters." This book tells their colorful stories. Besides providing fascinating anecdotes about some of those who graced and disgraced the operatic stage, Richard Somerset-Ward tells the story of their greatest glory-the singing tradition they founded and perfected, which we know as bel canto and which is still the backbone of operatic singing today. Rich in musical, social, and cultural lore, Angels and Monsters illuminates a unique and vanished tradition and will be irresistible to opera lovers everywhere.

  • Disguise - Masks and Global African Art.

    A dynamic look at the potential of disguise seen in masks, installations, and performances by contemporary artists of African descent

    While masks are a major art form in many parts of Africa, their use has taken new turns in the 21st century. Disguise: Masks and Global African Art explores how themes related to masking and disguise in the past are now transitioning into new platforms around the world. The authors examine the influence of masks residing in the Seattle Art Museum's renowned collection, investigating the longevity of masquerades, and how they offer ways to disrupt and reimagine reality.

    In today's global and digital world, artists are engaging with disguise through photography, video, and interactive platforms. Ten contemporary artists interviewed for this catalogue create work that conceals, layers, and reinvents identities. They include Jacolby Satterwhite, who creates extravagantly choreographed videos; Brendan Fernandes, whose performance-based works show how dance embodies disguise; and Zino Sara-Wiwa, a video artist and filmmaker who has examined the status of traditional Ogoni masks in the midst of Nigeria's destructive oil trade. They are joined by numerous others from around the globe who address the intersection of disguise, identity, ritual, and contemporary life.

  • Steven Spielberg: A Life in Films

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a film-centric portrait of the extraordinarily gifted movie director whose decades-long influence on American popular culture is unprecedented

    "Everything about me is in my films," Steven Spielberg has said. Taking this as a key to understanding the hugely successful moviemaker, Molly Haskell explores the full range of Spielberg's works for the light they shine upon the man himself. Through such powerhouse hits as Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., Jurassic Park, and Indiana Jones, to lesser-known masterworks like A.I. and Empire of the Sun, to the haunting Schindler's List, Haskell shows how Spielberg's uniquely evocative filmmaking and story-telling reveal the many ways in which his life, work, and times are entwined.

    Organizing chapters around specific films, the distinguished critic discusses how Spielberg's childhood in non-Jewish suburbs, his parents' traumatic divorce, his return to Judaism upon his son's birth, and other events echo in his work. She offers a brilliant portrait of the extraordinary director--a fearful boy living through his imagination who grew into a man whose openness, generosity of spirit, and creativity have enchanted audiences for more than 40 years.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent." -New York Times

    "Exemplary." -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished." -New Yorker

    "Superb." -The Guardian

  • What Intelligence Tests Miss - The Psychology of Rational Thought

    Critics of intelligence tests - writers such as Robert Sternberg, Howard Gardner and Daniel Goleman - have argued in recent years that these tests neglect important qualities such as emotion, empathy and interpersonal skills. However, such critiques imply that though intelligence tests may miss certain key noncognitive areas, they encompass most of what is important in the cognitive domain. In this book, Keith Stanovich challenges this widely held assumption. Stanovich shows that IQ tests (or their proxies, such as the SAT) are radically incomplete as measures of cognitive functioning. They fail to assess traits that most people associate with 'good thinking', skills such as judgement and decision-making. Such cognitive skills are crucial to real-world behaviour, affecting the way we plan, evaluate critical evidence, judge risks and probabilities, and make effective decisions. IQ tests fail to assess these skills of rational thought, even though they are measurable cognitive processes. Rational thought is just as important as intelligence, Stanovich argues, and it should be valued as highly as the abilities currently measured on intelligence tests.

  • Secrets of the Ice - Antarctica′s Clue to Climate, the Universe and the Limits of Life

    Sweeping research on the frozen continent of Antarctica is yielding insights of global importance.

    Antarctica is the only continent without permanent human habitation, yet it may hold the key to our survival. More than just a frontier for exploration, Antarctica is now understood to be a crucial part of a global climate and environment. Each year hundreds of scientists travel to the bottom of the world to investigate the climate, examine the continent's hardy life forms, and seek answers to far-reaching questions about the universe. Veronika Meduna has accompanied some of them on their expeditions, and in this engaging book she tells their stories and explains their dramatic discoveries.

    In remote field camps and icy laboratories on the frozen continent, geologists and glaciologists learn about past temperatures and levels of greenhouse gases, and about the implications of today's climate change for the future. Some scientists study migration patterns of emperor penguins as others focus on the antifreeze inside endemic fish species. Still others investigate the microbial "masters of survival" that may help to reveal how life evolved on Earth and what it may look like on other planets. In compelling, everyday language, Meduna provides a firsthand view of the wide range of scientific activity in Antarctica today along with fascinating portraits of the intrepid men and women conducting it. More than 150 stunning color photographs complete this arresting book.

  • Masterpieces from the Department of Islamic Art in The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    This lavish and informative book explores the great diversity and range of Islamic culture through one of the finest collections in the world. Published to coincide with the historic reopening of the galleries of the Metropolitan Museum's Islamic Art Department, it presents nearly three hundred masterworks created in the rich tradition of the Islamic faith and culture. The Metropolitan's renowned holdings range chronologically from the origins of Islam in the 7th century through the 19th century, and geographically from as far west as Spain to as far east as Southeast Asia. A wide variety of media is also represented: miniature paintings and illuminated manuscripts, ceramics, textiles, carpets, glass, and metalwork. While some of the highlighted objects were originally intended solely for use during worship, others - created as domestic and luxury objects - reflect the mutual influence of artistic practice in the sacred and secular realms. Many display the rich traditions of calligraphy, arabesque, and geometric patterning that distinguish the arts of the Islamic world. With seven informative essays and almost three hundred illustrated catalogue entries, supplemented by a history of the collection, a glossary, a bibliography, and an index, this comprehensive overview engages both the general reader and the specialist.

  • Walking Sculpture 1967-2015

    Artists have utilized walking as an autonomous form of art, a subject in their work, and as social practice since the early 20th century. Today walking continues to offer a salient means for artists to challenge social, political, and economic orders through a radical remapping of civic space. In this engaging and original book, Lexi Lee Sullivan traces the history of walking as an aesthetic action from the Dadaists to contemporary ramblers. Titled after Michelangelo Pistoletto's performance Walking Sculpture, the catalogue features 50 color illustrations ranging from photographs of Yvonne Rainer's street actions to Francis Alÿs's fantastical processions, poems by Cole Swensen, and a new project by artist Helen Mirra, who produces poetic meditations on landscape, ecology, and locomotion. Sculpture, film, video, photography, and performance converge to address the multi-disciplinary practice of ambulation through the cityscape and the countryside. For those who hike; march in fundraisers, protests, or parades; walk the dog; stroll in the park; or commute daily, this catalogue will invite new thought into basic human movement.

  • The Writings of Abraham Lincoln - Rethinking the Western Tradition Series

    Abraham Lincoln never wrote a book: his ideas are contained in speeches, letters, and various occasional writings. By bringing these works together into a single anthology, this book shows that Lincoln deserves to be counted among the great political philosophers.

    In addition to many examples of Lincoln's writings, this volume includes four interpretive essays that will provide an intellectual feast for any reader exploring his complex legacy. Danilo Petranovich looks at Lincoln's conception of the Union and its radically new focus on purging the nation of the problem of slavery. Ralph Lerner reconsiders Lincoln's relation to the American framers and in particular his effort to put the Declaration of Independence on a new foundation. Benjamin Kleinerman examines Lincoln's always controversial views on the scope of executive power during war. And Steven Smith considers the place of religion in Lincoln's political thought through a close reading of his Second Inaugural Address.

  • God is Beautiful and Loves Beauty - The Object in Islamic Art and Culture

    The Islamic world, spanning centuries and far-flung regions, is renowned for its diverse cultural and artistic traditions. This sumptuous book delves into that vast creative output, examining a dozen exquisite objects in the Museum of Islamic Art, in Doha, Qatar, designed by the Chinese-American architect I. M. Pei and opened in 2008. Twelve prominent scholars from across the globe select works representing various centers of Islamic life, from early Spain to 17th-century India, as well as a range of media including textiles, ceramics, metalwork, and miniature paintings. Authoritative texts put the objects into context, exploring the relationships to those people who produced and lived among them.

    In addition, architectural critic Paul Goldberger discusses the museum, assessing its place in Pei's career and in the broader scope of Islamic architecture, while Oliver Watson, the museum's former director, sheds light on the installation of works throughout the building.


  • Silla - Korea′s Golden Kingdom

    The Silla Kingdom, which flourished in Korea from 57 B.C. to 935 A.D., is known for its intricately crafted ornaments, many in resplendent gold, and for the creation of prominent Buddhist temples. Silla focuses on the striking artistic traditions of the Old and Unified Silla Kingdoms (4th-8th century), and is the first publication in English to explore the artistic and cultural legacy of this ancient realm. Among the topics explored are Korea's position as the eastern culmination of the Silk Road in the first millennium A.D. and the character and evolution of Buddhism, as illuminated by objects from major monuments, temples, and tombs. The book also presents new research about Silla's ancient capital, Gyeongju, which is known for the Gyerim-ro Dagger, as well as the pottery, glass, and beads discovered in tombs located there. Featuring over 100 magnificent objects, newly photographed and presented with the latest scholarship, this volume will be a revelation to many, and a lavish introduction to the glory that was Silla.

  • The Business of Books - Booksellers and the English Book Trade 1450-1850

    In 1450 very few English men or women were personally familiar with a book; by 1850, the great majority of people daily encountered books, magazines, or newspapers. This book explores the history of this fundamental transformation, from the arrival of the printing press to the coming of steam. James Raven presents a lively and original account of the English book trade and the printers, booksellers, and entrepreneurs who promoted its development.
    Viewing print and book culture through the lens of commerce, Raven offers a new interpretation of the genesis of literature and literary commerce in England. He draws on extensive archival sources to reconstruct the successes and failures of those involved in the book trade--a cast of heroes and heroines, villains, and rogues. And, through groundbreaking investigations of neglected aspects of book-trade history, Raven thoroughly revises our understanding of the massive popularization of the book and the dramatic expansion of its markets over the centuries.

  • A Deadly Art - European Crossbows, 1250-1850

    The advent of the crossbow more than 2,500 years ago effected dramatic changes for hunters and warriors. For centuries, it was among the most powerful and widely used handheld weapons, and its popularity endures to this day. A Deadly Art presents a lively, accessible survey of the crossbow's "golden age," along with detailed descriptions of twenty-four remarkable examples.

    Beginning in the middle ages, the European aristocracy's enthusiasm for the crossbow heralded shooting competitions and pageants that featured elaborately decorated weapons bearing elegant embellishments of rare materials and prized artistry. In addition to being highly functional, these weapons were magnificent works of art. A Deadly Art includes fascinating descriptions of crossbows used by Margaret of Savoy and Holy Roman Emperors Maximilian I and Charles V, among others.


  • The New Universe and the Human Future

    Two cutting-edge thinkers--one a cultural philosopher and the other a leading astrophysicist--combine their abilities to present a new picture of the universe with critical relevance for our time

    After a four-century rupture between science and the questions of value and meaning, this groundbreaking book presents an explosive and potentially life-altering idea: if the world could agree on a shared creation story based on modern cosmology and biology--a story that has just become available--it would redefine our relationship with Planet Earth and benefit all of humanity, now and into the distant future.

    Written in eloquent, accessible prose and illustrated in magnificent color throughout, including images from innovative simulations of the evolving universe, this book brings the new scientific picture of the universe to life. It interprets what our human place in the cosmos may mean for us and our descendants. It offers unique insights into the potential use of this newfound knowledge to find solutions to seemingly intractable global problems such as climate change and unsustainable growth. And it explains why we need to "think cosmically, act globally" if we're going to have a long-term, prosperous future on Earth.

  • The Architecture of the Scottish Medieval Church 1100-1560

    The first in-depth survey of Scotland's medieval church architecture covers buildings constructed between the early 12th century and the Reformation in 1560. From majestic cathedrals and abbeys to modest parish churches and chapels, Richard Fawcett places the architecture in context by considering the varied sources of ideas that underlay church designs. Over the centuries, Scottish patrons and their masons moved away from a close relationship with England to create a unique late medieval architectural synthesis that took ideas from a wide range of sources. The book concludes with an account of the impact of the Reformation on church construction and design.

  • Richard Diebenkorn: The Catalogue Raisonne

    A four-volume definitive resource on the career and unique works of the postwar American artist Richard Diebenkorn

    The celebrated American artist Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) was a singular figure in postwar American art. Early in his career, he created abstract paintings that combined landscape influence, aerial perspective, and a deeply personal calligraphic language. Then, in late 1955, he began working in a representational mode (landscapes, figure studies, and still lifes) and was associated with the Bay Area figurative movement. Diebenkorn later abandoned figurative references in the 1960s and embarked on monumental abstract, geometrical compositions, including his celebrated Ocean Park works.

    This four-volume catalogue raisonne is the definitive resource on Diebenkorn's unique works, including his paintings, works on paper, and three-dimensional objects. The first volume gives an overview of the artist's career, featuring essays by noted scholars John Elderfield, Ruth E. Fine, Jane Livingston, Steven Nash, and Gerald Nordland, as well as an illustrated chronology, list of exhibitions, bibliography, and selection of studio notes. The second volume spans his student and early abstract works; the third volume features his representational works during the Berkeley period; and the fourth volume covers his later periods, as well as his sketchbooks and other little-known private drawings. Many of the more than five thousand works illustrated in this catalogue are being published for the first time, and with new color photography that showcases his work like never before.

  • Hieronymus Cock - The Renaissance in Print

    Hieronymus Cock (1518-1570) was an Antwerp painter and printmaker. Together with his wife, he was one of the first to establish a publishing house for prints. From 1548 their firm "At the Sign of the Four Winds" issued hundreds of important etchings and engravings. Prints after frescoes and paintings by Italian artists Raphael and Bronzino, the first series of classical ruins, antique sculpture, as well as designs by such Northern artists as Maarten van Heemskerck and Frans Floris were distributed all over Europe and helped to spread Renaissance ideals of beauty. It was Cock who spotted the talent of Pieter Bruegel, an artist who would eventually supply Cock with more than sixty designs for prints.

  • Treasures from Korea - Arts and Culture of the Joseon Dynasty, 1392-1910

    Art of the Joseon Dynasty is the first major publication outside of Korea to survey the artistic production of the world's longest-ruling Confucian dynasty, which reigned on the Korean peninsula from 1392 to 1910. The Joseon dynasty left a substantial legacy for modern Korea, influencing contemporary etiquette, cultural norms, and societal attitudes. Beautifully illustrated with colour images of some 200 masterworks from major Korean public and private collections, this important volume offers readers a detailed look at the fascinating art of the Joseon, from the exquisitely crafted pieces used by the court to scholarly implements, ritual items, and Buddhist arts. A variety of mediums, including prints, paintings, calligraphy, books, ceramics, sculptures, metal works, and costumes and textiles, are organized around five key themes: the king and his court, Joseon society, ancestral rites, Buddhism in a Confucian society, and Joseon in modern times.

  • Bedfordshire, Huntingdonshire and Peterborough - Buildings of England Series

    Bedfordshire is one of the smallest English counties but encompasses great variety in landscape and architecture. Its major monument is Woburn Abbey, one of the finest Georgian country houses in England, and the influence of the estate is widely felt in the model housing and schools in the county's villages. Its many other attractions range from the churches of the market towns of Bedford, Leighton Buzzard, and Ampthill to the majestic gardens at Wrest Park. Such variety is also to be found in Huntingdonshire and Peterborough, famous not only for the cathedral and the spires of the stone medieval parish churches scattered across its remote and intimate landscape but also for vast and stately Burghley House and Vanbrugh's Kimbolton Castle. This a fully revised edition of Pevsner's original guide of 1968 and contains separate introductions, gazetteers, and photographs for Bedfordshire, Huntingdonshire, and Peterborough.

  • Landscapes of Modern Architecture: Wright, Mies, Neutra, Aalto, Barragán

    An authoritative study of the interrelationship between modern architecture, landscape, and site strategy as viewed through the work of five prominent architects

    Modern architects are often condemned for a seeming disregard of site considerations such as climate, topography, and existing vegetation. Noted landscape and architectural historian Marc Treib counters this prevailing view in an authoritative and unprecedented survey of 20th-century buildings and their landscapes. Exploring a range of architectural, philosophical, and theoretical approaches, Treib investigates the site strategies of five prominent modern-period architects: Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), Richard Neutra (1892-1970), Alvar Aalto (1898-1976), and Luis Barragan (1902-1988).

    The character of the sites on which these architects worked dramatically affected their architecture and gardens, a fact illustrated by Wright's "organic" regard of the desert; Mies's evolving divorce of building from terrain; Neutra's transformation of the "realities" of the site; Aalto's use of the forest metaphor and interior landscapes; and Barragan's architectonic conversion of the land. Fully illustrated with rarely published archival drawings and plans, accompanied by the author's own exceptional photographs, this book presents the spectrum of architectural responses to the constraints of site, climate, client, program, building material, region, and nation. Taken as a group, the work of these five architects sheds important light on the consideration and influence of the site and landscape on the practice of architecture during the 20th century.

  • According to our Hearts - Rhinelander v. Rhinelander and the Law of the Multiracial Family

    This landmark book looks at what it means to be a multiracial couple in the United States today. According to Our Hearts begins with a look back at a 1925 case in which a two-month marriage ends with a man suing his wife for misrepresentation of her race, and shows how our society has yet to come to terms with interracial marriage. Angela Onwuachi-Willig examines the issue by drawing from a variety of sources, including her own experiences. She argues that housing law, family law, and employment law fail, in important ways, to protect multiracial couples. In a society in which marriage is used to give, withhold, and take away status--in the workplace and elsewhere--she says interracial couples are at a disadvantage, which is only exacerbated by current law.

  • Europe Between the Oceans - 9000 BC-AD 1000

    A sensational, interdisciplinary work which entirely reorients our understanding of Europe from 10,000 BC to the time of the Vikings

    In this magnificent book, distinguished archaeologist Barry Cunliffe reframes our entire conception of early European history, from prehistory through the ancient world to the medieval Viking period. Cunliffe views Europe not in terms of states and shifting political land boundaries but as a geographical niche particularly favored in facing many seas. These seas, and Europe's great transpeninsular rivers, ensured a rich diversity of natural resources while also encouraging the dynamic interaction of peoples across networks of communication and exchange. The development of these early Europeans is rooted in complex interplays, shifting balances, and geographic and demographic fluidity.

    Drawing on archaeology, anthropology, and history, Cunliffe has produced an interdisciplinary tour de force. His is a bold book of exceptional scholarship, erudite and engaging, and it heralds an entirely new understanding of Old Europe.

  • Byzantium and Islam - Age of Transition

    This groundbreaking volume explores the epochal transformations and unexpected continuities in the Byzantine Empire from the seventh to the ninth century. As the period opened, the Empire's southern provinces--the vibrant, diverse areas of North Africa and the eastern Mediterranean--were at the crossroads of trade routes reaching from Spain to China. These regions experienced historic upheavals when their Christian and Jewish communities encountered the emerging Islamic world, and by the ninth century, an unprecedented cross-fertilization of cultures had taken place.

    This extraordinary age is brought vividly to life by leading international scholars, their writings accompanied by sumptuous illustrations of the period's most notable arts and artifacts. Resplendent images of authority, religion, and trade--embodied in precious metals, brilliant textiles, fine ivories, elaborate mosaics, manuscripts, and icons, many of them never before published--highlight the dynamic dialogue between the rich array of Byzantine styles and the evolving Islamic aesthetic. With its masterful exploration of two centuries that would shape the emerging medieval world, Byzantium and Islam provides a revelatory interpretation of a period with profound ramifications for the modern era.

  • All the Trees of the Forest - Israel′s Woodlands from the Bible to the Present

    The extraordinary story of Israel's forests, from ancient times to the present.

    In this insightful and provocative book, Alon Tal provides a detailed account of Israeli forests, tracing their history from the Bible to the present, and outlines the effort to transform drylands and degraded soils into prosperous parks, rangelands, and ecosystems. Tal's description of Israel's trials and errors, and his exploration of both the environmental history and the current policy dilemmas surrounding that country's forests, will provide valuable lessons in the years to come for other parts of the world seeking to reestablish timberlands.

  • After Buddhism - Rethinking the Dharma for a Secular Age

    A renowned Buddhist teacher's magnum opus, based on his fresh reading of the tradition's earliest texts

    Some twenty-five centuries after the Buddha started teaching, his message continues to inspire people across the globe, including those living in predominantly secular societies. What does it mean to adapt religious practices to secular contexts?

    Stephen Batchelor, an internationally known author and teacher, is committed to a secularized version of the Buddha's teachings. The time has come, he feels, to articulate a coherent ethical, contemplative, and philosophical vision of Buddhism for our age. After Buddhism, the culmination of four decades of study and practice in the Tibetan, Zen, and Theravada traditions, is his attempt to set the record straight about who the Buddha was and what he was trying to teach. Combining critical readings of the earliest canonical texts with narrative accounts of five members of the Buddha's inner circle, Batchelor depicts the Buddha as a pragmatic ethicist rather than a dogmatic metaphysician. He envisions Buddhism as a constantly evolving culture of awakening whose long survival is due to its capacity to reinvent itself and interact creatively with each society it encounters.

    This original and provocative book presents a new framework for understanding the remarkable spread of Buddhism in today's globalized world. It also reminds us of what was so startling about the Buddha's vision of human flourishing.

  • Hyperlinks: Architecture and Design

    Modern architecture and design were long viewed as separate disciplines, until practitioners in the mid-20th century began crossing boundaries and rethinking form and function. This fluid exchange of ideas has led to innovative solutions addressing issues at the heart of contemporary life, ones that affect the environment, sustainability, technology, politics, personal well-being, and health and safety. This handsome catalogue highlights important recent developments that have resulted from the intersection of architecture and design. The projects examined in this book have been produced by an international array of individuals and studios including Jurgen Mayer H., Greg Lynn, Simon Heijdens, M/M (Paris), and Matali Crasset. Whether tackling new solutions to traditional spatial practices, suggesting inventive responses to current environmental concerns, or dealing with issues that address the collective well-being of society, the practitioners who are included in this volume are at the forefront of a cutting-edge field.

  • Hitler at Home

    A revelatory look at the residences of Adolf Hitler, illuminating their powerful role in constructing and promoting the dictator's private persona both within Germany and abroad

    Adolf Hitler's makeover from rabble-rouser to statesman coincided with a series of dramatic home renovations he undertook during the mid-1930s. This provocative book exposes the dictator's preoccupation with his private persona, which was shaped by the aesthetic and ideological management of his domestic architecture. Hitler's bachelor life stirred rumors, and the Nazi regime relied on the dictator's three dwellings--the Old Chancellery in Berlin, his apartment in Munich, and the Berghof, his mountain home on the Obersalzberg--to foster the myth of the Fuhrer as a morally upstanding and refined man. Author Despina Stratigakos also reveals the previously untold story of Hitler's interior designer, Gerdy Troost, through newly discovered archival sources.

    At the height of the Third Reich, media outlets around the world showcased Hitler's homes to audiences eager for behind-the-scenes stories. After the war, fascination with Hitler's domestic life continued as soldiers and journalists searched his dwellings for insights into his psychology. The book's rich illustrations, many previously unpublished, offer readers a rare glimpse into the decisions involved in the making of Hitler's homes and into the sheer power of the propaganda that influenced how the world saw him.

  • Josef Koudelka - Nationality Doubtful

    A retrospective catalog featuring vintage prints as well as recent, unpublished work by an internationally acclaimed photographer
    This retrospective catalog features vintage prints as well as recent, unpublished work by internationally acclaimed photographer Josef Koudelka (b. 1938). A leading member of the photo agency Magnum, co-founded by his close friend Henri Cartier-Bresson, Koudelka has been a legend since the publication of his unforgettable eyewitness photographs taken during the invasion of Czechoslovakia by Soviet-led troops in 1968. In addition to Invasion and Exiles, Koudelka s most ambitious project, Gypsies, is featured with the complete set of twenty-two prints first exhibited in 1967. Koudelka s impressive imagery is accompanied here by five essays that provide a thorough understanding of and appreciation for this outstanding artist, willfully independent and reclusive despite his renown."

  • A Great Leap Forward - 1930′s Depression and U.S. Economic Growth

    This bold re-examination of the history of U.S. economic growth is built around a novel claim, that productive capacity grew dramatically across the Depression years (1929-1941) and that this advance provided the foundation for the economic and military success of the United States during the Second World War as well as for the golden age (1948-1973) that followed.

    Alexander J. Field takes a fresh look at growth data and concludes that, behind a backdrop of double-digit unemployment, the 1930s actually experienced very high rates of technological and organizational innovation, fueled by the maturing of a privately funded research and development system and the government-funded build-out of the country's surface road infrastructure. This significant new volume in the Yale Series in Economic and Financial History invites new discussion of the causes and consequences of productivity growth over the last century and a half and on our current prospects.

  • Gabriel Metsu

    Gabriel Metsu (1625-1667) employed an unusual variety of styles, techniques, and subjects, making him a particularly difficult artist to characterize. From his early days in Leiden until his death in Amsterdam at the height of his career, his unparalleled mastery of the brush allowed him to paint a remarkable range of history paintings, portraits, still lifes, but most of all, exquisite genre paintings. And whatever his subject matter, his work reveals an unrivalled talent for imbuing figures with a human and personable character. During the 18th and 19th centuries, Metsu held a place as one of the most celebrated painters of the Dutch Golden Age, and his works were acquired for noble collections throughout Europe, while his contemporary Johannes Vermeer was almost unheard of. In the 20th century their positions were reversed as Vermeers reputation soared. This enlightening book resituates Metsu as one of the leading genre painters of his time. It offers a portrait of the age through his patrons and his wide network of contacts and colleagues in Amsterdam, as well as analysis of Metsus technique as a draftsman and as a painter, and it documents the fashions and fabrics of the time through his work.

  • Faust - A Tragedy, Parts One and Two

    A classic of world literature, Goethe's Faust is a philosophical and poetic drama full of satire, irony, humor, and tragedy. Martin Greenberg re-creates not only the text's varied meter and rhyme but also its diverse tones and styles--dramatic and lyrical, reflective and farcical, pathetic and coarse, colloquial and soaring. His rendition of Faust is the first faithful, readable, and elegantly written translation of Goethe's masterpiece available in English. At last, the Greenberg Faust is available in a single volume, together with a thoroughly updated translation, preface, and notes.

    "Greenberg has accomplished a magnificent literary feat. He has taken a great German work, until now all but inaccessible to English readers, and made it into a sparkling English poem, full of verve and wit. Greenberg's translation lives; it is done in a modern idiom but with respect for the original text; I found it a joy to read."--Irving Howe (on the earlier edition)

  • Van Gogh and Nature

    A revelatory study of the importance of nature in Van Gogh's art throughout his life in Holland and France

    The celebrated painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) had a lifelong fascination with the natural world. He spent his youth in rural Holland, and the country's flat landscapes, trees, flowers, and birds would feature in his early art. After he moved to Paris, he encountered new radical thinking about art and humanity's changing relationship with nature. Later, in Provence and Auvers, he discovered unfamiliar terrain, flora, and fauna that further influenced his artistic ideas and subject matter. Van Gogh's images of such diverse environments reflect not only his immediate surroundings but also the artist's evolving engagement with nature and art.

    Van Gogh and Nature is an eye-opening and beautifully produced catalogue, which accompanied the best-attended special exhibition in the Clark Art Institute's history. It chronicles the artist's ongoing relationship with nature throughout his entire career. Among the featured works are Van Gogh's drawings and paintings, along with related materials that illuminate his reading, sources, and influences. Vivid color photography and explanatory texts based on new research by the authors clarify a central theme of Van Gogh's oeuvre.

  • Spies - The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America

    This stunning book, based on KGB archives that have never come to light before, provides the most complete account of Soviet espionage in America ever written. In 1993, former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev was permitted unique access to Stalin-era records of Soviet intelligence operations against the United States. Years later, living in Britain, Vassiliev retrieved his extensive notebooks of transcribed documents from Moscow. With these notebooks John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr have meticulously constructed a new, sometimes shocking, historical account. Along with general insights into espionage tactics and the motives of Americans who spied for Stalin, 'Spies' resolves specific, long-seething controversies. The book confirms, among many other things, that Alger Hiss cooperated with Soviet intelligence over a period of years, that journalist I. F. Stone worked on behalf of the KGB in the 1930s, and that Robert Oppenheimer was never recruited by Soviet intelligence. 'Spies' also uncovers numerous American spies who were never even under suspicion and satisfyingly identifies the last unaccounted-for American nuclear spies. Vassiliev tells the story of the notebooks and his own extraordinary life in a gripping introduction to the volume.

  • Nineteenth-Century European Paintings at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute

    The core of the Clark's collection was assembled by Robert Sterling Clark (1877-1956), who once declared, "I like all kinds of art if it is good of its kind." This monumental, two-volume publication is the first fully documented catalogue of the Institute's collection of European paintings. The quality of this collection reflects the founder's philosophy in its inclusion of masterpieces as diverse as William-Adolphe Bouguereau's Nymphs and Satyr (1873) and Pierre-Auguste Renoir's A Box at the Theater (1880); works by academic painters such as Jean-Leon Gerome; Barbizon painters such as Camille Corot and Jean-Francois Millet; and the Impressionists Camille Pissarro and Edgar Degas. More recent acquisitions include Theodore Rousseau's Farm in the Landes (1844-67) and Claude Monet's Rouen Cathedral (1894), and works by John Constable and J. M. W. Turner.

    Published on the 100th anniversary of Sterling Clark's first purchase of a European painting, these handsome volumes document each of the 374 paintings in the collection, with essays by prominent scholars, detailed bibliographic and art historical apparatus, technical notes, and over 450 color illustrations.

  • Coney Island - Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861-2008

    A captivating look at Coney Island and its iconic place in the history of American art

    Called "America's playground," Coney Island is a world-famous resort and national cultural symbol that has inspired music, literature, and films. This groundbreaking book is the first to look at the site's enduring status as inspiration for artists throughout the ages, from its inception as an elite seaside resort in the mid-19th century, to its evolution into an entertainment mecca for the masses, with the eventual closing of its iconic amusement park, Astroland, in 2008 after decades of urban decline. How artists chose to portray Coney Island between 1861 and 2008--in tableaux of wonder and menace, hope and despair, dreams and nightmares--mirrored the aspirations and disappointments of the era.

    This dazzling catalogue highlights more than 200 images from Coney Island's history, including paintings, drawings, photographs, prints, posters, film stills, architectural artifacts, and carousel animals. An extraordinary array of artists is represented, from George Bellows, William Merritt Chase, Reginald Marsh, and Joseph Stella to Diane Arbus, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Robert Frank, Red Grooms, Weegee, and Swoon. Essays by prominent scholars analyze Coney Island through its imagery and ephemera as both a place and an idea--one that reflected the collective soul of the nation.

  • The City Lost and Found - Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960-1980

    An unprecedented exploration of the relationship between art, architecture, social history, and public policy in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles in the 1960s and '70s

    American cities underwent seismic transformations in the 1960s and '70s, from shifting demographics and political protests to reshaping through highways and urban renewal. Amid this climate of upheaval, photographers, architects, activists, performance artists, and filmmakers turned conditions of crisis into sites for civic discourse and artistic expression. The City Lost and Found explores photographic and cinematic responses to the changing fabric of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles that contributed to a reconsideration of cities in popular media and urban policy during this period. This book raises timely questions about the role of art within the social, political, and physical landscape of cities.

    Featuring contributions from more than 20 noted scholars in fields including art history, urban planning, architecture, and cultural studies, this is the first publication to address an important shift in photographic, cinematic, and planning practices based on close observations of streets, neighborhoods, and seminal events in the country's three largest cities. Over 200 illustrations bring together works by major artists and newly rediscovered projects to complete this outstanding resource on the art and architectural production during these turbulent decades.

  • Barbra Streisand: Redefining Beauty, Femininity, and Power

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, an enthralling appreciation of the monumentally gifted popular artist and cultural icon who challenged Hollywood's standards of beauty and glamour

    Barbra Streisand has been called the "most successful...talented performer of her generation" by Vanity Fair, and her voice, said pianist Glenn Gould, is "one of the natural wonders of the age." Streisand scaled the heights of entertainment--from a popular vocalist to a first-rank Broadway star in Funny Girl to an Oscar-winning actress to a producer and director. But she has also become a cultural icon who has transcended show business. To achieve her success, Brooklyn-born Streisand had to overcome tremendous odds, not the least of which was her Jewishness. Dismissed, insulted, even reviled when she embarked on a show business career for acting too Jewish and looking too Jewish, she brilliantly converted her Jewishness into a metaphor for outsiderness that would eventually make her the avenger for anyone who felt marginalized and powerless.

    Neal Gabler examines Streisand's life and career through this prism of otherness--a Jew in a gentile world, a self-proclaimed homely girl in a world of glamour, a kooky girl in a world of convention--and shows how central it was to Streisand's triumph as one of the voices of her age.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent" -New York Times

    "Exemplary" -Wall St. Journal

    "Distinguished" -New Yorker

    "Superb" -The Guardian

  • Dallas Museum of Art - A Guide to the Collection

    Explore the world renowned collection of the Dallas Museum of Art in this lavishly illustrated, informative catalogue. Dallas Museum of Art: A Guide to the Collection showcases the full range and exceptional quality of the rich holdings of one of America's premier art institutions. The guide features over 400 stunning color photographs of pieces from the Museum's outstanding encyclopedic collection. Works from the ancient Americas, Africa, Asia, the Pacific, the ancient Mediterranean, Europe, and America are all represented, along with modern and contemporary pieces. Accompanying object entries offer descriptions, explanations of iconography, information on the artist or cultural history, and information on provenance and techniques.

  • Democracy, Expertise, and Academic Freedom

    A leading American legal scholar offers a surprising account of the incompleteness of prevailing theories of freedom of speech. Robert C. Post shows that the familiar understanding of the First Amendment, which stresses the "marketplace of ideas" and which holds that "everyone is entitled to an opinion," is inadequate to create and preserve the expert knowledge that is necessary for a modern democracy to thrive. For a modern society reliably to answer such questions as whether nicotine causes cancer, the free and open exchange of ideas must be complemented by standards of scientific competence and practice that are both hierarchical and judgmental.

    Post develops a theory of First Amendment rights that seeks to explain both the need for the free formation of public opinion and the need for the distribution and creation of expertise. Along the way he offers a new and useful account of constitutional doctrines of academic freedom. These doctrines depend both upon free expression and the necessity of the kinds of professional judgment that universities exercise when they grant or deny tenure, or that professional journals exercise when they accept or reject submissions.

  • The Elements of Power - Gadgets, Guns, and the Struggle for a Sustainable Future in the Rare Metal Age

    A natural resource strategist investigates the growing global demand for rare metals and what it means to the environment and our future

    Our future hinges on a set of elements that few of us have even heard of. In this surprising and revealing book, David S. Abraham unveils what rare metals are and why our electronic gadgets, the most powerful armies, and indeed the fate of our planet depend on them. These metals have become the building blocks of modern society; their properties are now essential for nearly all our electronic, military, and "green" technologies. But their growing use is not without environmental, economic, and geopolitical consequences.

    Abraham traces these elements' hidden paths from mines to our living rooms, from the remote hills of China to the frozen Gulf of Finland, providing vivid accounts of those who produce, trade, and rely on rare metals. He argues that these materials are increasingly playing a significant role in global affairs, conferring strength to countries and companies that can ensure sustainable supplies.

    Just as oil, iron, and bronze revolutionized previous eras, so too will these metals. The challenges this book reveals, and the plans it proposes, make it essential reading for our rare metal age.

  • S.J. Peploe

    Samuel John Peploe (1871-1935) was the eldest of the four artists popularly known as "The Scottish Colourists." Born in Edinburgh, he was drawn to France and returned to paint there frequently, moving in 1910 to Paris, where he moved in artistic avant-garde circles. His painting style gave way to a more contemporary and expressive approach, and he used rich colors applied with more structured brushstrokes. In 1912 Peploe returned to Edinburgh and slowly began to build a successful career as an exhibiting artist. From around 1914 until his death, he sought to paint the perfect still life. A modest selection of props, including roses or tulips, fans, books, fruits, and Chinese vases, were carefully placed in infinite varieties on patterned drapery. In 1929 he explained: "There is so much in mere objects, flowers, leaves, jugs, what not--colors, forms, relation--I can never see mystery coming to an end." This beautifully illustrated book accompanies a major exhibition devoted to the artist in his home town of Edinburgh, and throws fascinating new light on Peploe's life, on the influence of France on his work, and on his posthumous reputation.

  • The World Atlas of Tattoo

    A lavishly illustrated global exploration of the vast array of styles and most significant practitioners of tattoo from ancient times to today

    Tattoo art and practice has seen radical changes in the 21st century, as its popularity has exploded. An expanding number of tattoo artists have been mining the past for lost traditions and innovating with new technology. An enormous diversity of styles, genres, and techniques has emerged, ranging from geometric blackwork to vibrant, painterly styles, and from hand-tattooed works to machine-produced designs.

    With over 700 stunning color illustrations, this volume considers historical and contemporary tattoo practices in Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, North and Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands. Each section, dedicated to a specific geographic region, features fascinating text by tattoo experts that explores the history and traditions native to that area as well as current styles and trends. The World Atlas of Tattoo also tracks the movement of styles from their indigenous settings to diasporic communities, where they have often been transformed into creative, multicultural, hybrid designs. The work of 100 notable artists from around the globe is showcased in this definitive reference on a widespread and intriguing art practice.

  • Edvard Munch - Works on Paper

    A celebratory homage to Edvard Munch on the 150th anniversary of his birth

    This superb book is dedicated to Edvard Munch's vast and fascinating oeuvre of works on paper. Featured in beautiful color reproductions are key images related to well-known prints and drawings, as well as lesser known works, such as childhood drawings and caricatures. Essays by critically acclaimed art historians examine, among other things, the various techniques that Munch used for his prints and drawings; charming examples of childhood drawings featuring his family and their daily life; his interaction with contemporary artists and the intellectual milieu of the so-called "Kristiania Bohemia" and Oslo's night life; and the impact of his volatile romantic relationship with Tulla Larsen. In sum, this invaluable book reveals many new insights into the life and work of one of the world's best-known yet enigmatic artists.

  • The Surreal House - Architecture of Desire

    Through a unique blend of art, film and architecture, 'The Surreal House' presents the individual dwelling as a place of mystery and wonder. Fusing house and dream, it probes the relationship between interior and shell, object and space; and it elaborates 'the marvellous' and 'compulsive beauty' as espoused by Andre Breton. The haunted house, the cabinet of curiosities, the ruined castle, the cage, the cave, the box, the labyrinth, the bell jar and the womb are among the uniquely surreal habitats explored. Shaped by the irrational and the subversive, the flip side of the modernist paradigm of the functional, rational dwelling, 'The Surreal House' is ripe for discovery. Mirroring the surrealist love of poetic juxtaposition, the project brings together works by artists such as Edward Hopper, Marcel Duchamp, Giorgio de Chirico, Man Ray, Max Ernst, Rene Magritte, Joseph Cornell and Salvador Dali. A surreal legacy is to be found in the interiors of little-known Italian architect and designer, Carlo Mollino; Frederick Kiesler's model for 'The Endless House, 1957-59'; sculptures by Louise Bourgeois and Rebecca Horn; and, installations by Edward Kienholz and Ilya Kabakov. Contemporary architecture is represented by the work of Rem Koolhaas and Diller & Scofidio, among others. A manifesto for a poetic reading of the house, 'The Surreal House' reflects on the unquestionable importance of the dwelling, the cradle of our being, in the imaginative realm. This richly illustrated account brings together a host of commentators and historians, and accompanies a major exhibition. Exhibition: Barbican Art Gallery 10 June - 17 September 2010.

  • Altered And Adorned - Using Renaissance Prints in Daily Life

    Today Renaissance-era prints are typically preserved behind glass or in solander boxes in museums, but these decorative objects were once a central part of everyday life. Altered and Adorned is a delightful, surprising look at how prints were used: affixed on walls; glued into albums, books, and boxes; annotated; hand-colored; or cut apart.

    This handsome volume introduces readers to the experimental world of printmaking in the mid-15th and 16th centuries and the array of objects it inspired, from illustrated books, sewing patterns, and wearable ornaments to printed sundials and anatomical charts. It features many never-before-published treasures from the Art Institute of Chicago's rich permanent collection, along with essays on the ways prints functioned--in some cases as three-dimensional and interactive works--and how their condition communicates their use.

  • Wilderness and the American Mind 5ed

    1 unite(s) de cet article soldee(s) a partir du 8 janvier 2020 8h (uniquement sur les unites vendues et expediees par Amazon)

    "The Book of Genesis for conservationists"--Dave Foreman

    Roderick Nash's classic study of changing attitudes toward wilderness during American history, as well as the origins of the environmental and conservation movements, has received wide acclaim since its initial publication in 1967. The Los Angeles Times listed it among the one hundred most influential books published in the last quarter century, Outside Magazine included it in a survey of "books that changed our world," and it has been called the "Book of Genesis for environmentalists."

    For the fifth edition, Nash has written a new preface and epilogue that brings Wilderness and the American Mind into dialogue with contemporary debates about wilderness. Char Miller's foreword provides a twenty-first-century perspective on how the environmental movement has changed, including the ways in which contemporary scholars are reimagining the dynamic relationship between the natural world and the built environment.

  • Painting a Map of Sixteenth-Century Mexico City - Land, Writing and Native Rule

    In 1975, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Yale University acquired an exceptional mid-16th-century map of Mexico City, which, until 1521, had been the capital of the Aztecs, the Nahua-speaking peoples who dominated the Valley of Mexico. This extraordinary six-by-three-foot document, showing landholdings and indigenous rulers, has yielded a wealth of information about the artistic, linguistic, and material culture of the Nahua after the Spanish invasion. This book marks the first publication of both the complete map and the multi-disciplinary research that it spurred.

    A distinguished team of specialists in history, art history, linguistics, and conservation science has worked together for nearly a decade; the scientific analysis of the map's pigments and paper in 2007 marks the most thorough examination of a pictorial document from early colonial Mexico to date. The result of their work, the essays in Painting a Map of Sixteenth-Century Mexico, not only focuses on the map but also explores the situation of the indigenous people of Mexico City in the 16th century and their interactions with Europeans.

  • Visual Strategies - A Practical Guide to Graphics for Scientists and Engineers

    For researchers in all disciplines, this book offers a practical, hands-on course in communicating scientific findings and concepts through visual graphics

    Any scientist or engineer who communicates research results will immediately recognize this practical handbook as an indispensable tool. The guide sets out clear strategies and offers abundant examples to assist researchers--even those with no previous design training--with creating effective visual graphics for use in multiple contexts, including journal submissions, grant proposals, conference posters, or presentations.

    Visual communicator Felice Frankel and systems biologist Angela DePace, along with experts in various fields, demonstrate how small changes can vastly improve the success of a graphic image. They dissect individual graphics, show why some work while others don't, and suggest specific improvements. The book includes analyses of graphics that have appeared in such journals as Science, Nature, Annual Reviews, Cell, PNAS, and the New England Journal of Medicine, as well as an insightful personal conversation with designer Stefan Sagmeister and narratives by prominent researchers and animators.

  • Social Choice and Individual Values

    Originally published in 1951, Social Choice and Individual Values introduced "Arrow's Impossibility Theorem" and founded the field of social choice theory in economics and political science. This new edition, including a new foreword by Nobel laureate Eric Maskin, reintroduces Arrow's seminal book to a new generation of students and researchers.

    "Far beyond a classic, this small book unleashed the ongoing explosion of interest in social choice and voting theory. A half-century later, the book remains full of profound insight: its central message, 'Arrow's Theorem, ' has changed the way we think."--Donald G. Saari, author of Decisions and Elections: Explaining the Unexpected

  • The Allure of the Archives

    An exquisite appreciation of the distinctive rewards of historical research and a classic guide to the personal yet disciplined craft of discovery, now in its first English translation.

    Arlette Farge's Le Gout de l'archive is widely regarded as a historiographical classic. While combing through two-hundred-year-old judicial records from the Archives of the Bastille, historian Farge was struck by the extraordinarily intimate portrayal they provided of the lives of the poor in pre-Revolutionary France, especially women. She was seduced by the sensuality of old manuscripts and by the revelatory power of voices otherwise lost. In The Allure of the Archives, she conveys the exhilaration of uncovering hidden secrets and the thrill of venturing into new dimensions of the past.

    Originally published in 1989, Farge's classic work communicates the tactile, interpretive, and emotional experience of archival research while sharing astonishing details about life under the Old Regime in France. At once a practical guide to research methodology and an elegant literary reflection on the challenges of writing history, this uniquely rich volume demonstrates how surrendering to the archive's allure can forever change how we understand the past.

  • Hopper Drawing

    Edward Hopper (18821967) is recognized as one of the most well-known American artists of the 20th century. His distinctive style, combining subtle observations of the world with his imagination, has not only influenced other artists but also photographers, filmmakers, and popular culture. Although Hopper is primarily known for his oil paintings, including such iconic works as "Nighthawks "(1942) and "Early Sunday Morning" (1930), this important publication is the first comprehensive exploration of his drawings and working methods. In 1967, Hopper s widow, Josephine Nivison Hopper, bequeathed her husband s artistic estate to the Whitney Museum of American Art, including a fascinating collection of more than 2,500 drawings spanning his entire career. This group of works has never been the subject of in-depth study and many have never been reproduced before. Hopper kept these drawings for personal reference as he revisited various themes throughout his career. Carter E. Foster examines how Hopper used his drawings to develop his paintings, arguing that the artist s work can only be fully understood aftercareful study of these preparatory sketches. Foster also argues that Hopper was, in many ways, a traditional draftsman who methodically developed schematic ideas into detailed studies to refine content. However, the steps toward this refinement are unique to Hopper and reveal how he turned the mundane into poetic images with universal appeal. "

  • A Blueprint for War: FDR and the Hundred Days That Mobilized America

    In the cold winter months that followed Franklin Roosevelt's election in November 1940 to an unprecedented third term in the White House, he confronted a worldwide military and moral catastrophe. Almost all the European democracies had fallen under the ruthless onslaught of the Nazi army and air force. Great Britain stood alone, a fragile bastion between Germany and American immersion in war. In the Pacific world, Japan had extended its tentacles deeper into China. Susan Dunn dramatically brings to life the most vital and transformational period of Roosevelt's presidency: the hundred days between December 1940 and March 1941, when he mobilized American industry, mustered the American people, initiated the crucial programs and approved the strategic plans for America's leadership in World War II. As the nation began its transition into the preeminent military, industrial, and moral power on the planet, FDR laid out the stunning blueprint not only for war but for the American Century.

  • Pop Departures

    A survey of the decades-long legacy of American Pop Art, from the iconic works of the 1960s to contemporary art that innovatively revisits the movement's key themes

    Pop Art's influence continues to be felt more than a half century since its advent, as this engaging book deftly shows. Early Pop artists such as Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, and Andy Warhol adopted alternately critical, embracing, or ambivalent attitudes toward America's rapidly proliferating consumer culture and its representations. Key works by these artists are illustrated as the foundation for this look at the ongoing relevance of Pop Art and its interrogation of American culture into the 21st century. Following Pop's heyday in the early 1960s, new generations of artists have returned to the questions surrounding consumerism and media culture. Works made in the 1980s and 1990s by Jeff Koons, Barbara Kruger, Richard Prince, and others reveal new methods and visual strategies that addressed these issues in a much different political and social climate. The innovative work of younger contemporary artists such as Elad Lassry, Josephine Meckseper, and Ryan Trecartin demonstrates that commodity culture, display, and the cult of celebrity maintain a strong resonance and are critically examined by today's artists. The catalogue also includes short texts by several artists, curators, and art historians, including Josephine Meckseper, James Voorhies, Richard Meyer, and Hal Foster.

  • Playing for the Benefit of the Band - New Orleans Music Culture

    Lee Friedlander (b. 1934) first visited the birthplace of jazz in 1957, and immediately set about photographing the aging pioneers of the art form. His love of the music and the people of New Orleans drew him back to the city, and the relationships he formed over time gave him intimate access to a scene that forged one of America's most original artistic traditions. A revised and expanded edition of his 1992 monograph The Jazz People of New Orleans, Playing for the Benefit of the Band features over 200 photographs taken by Friedlander between 1957 and 1982, many of which are published here for the first time. Storied figures such as Duke Ellington and Mahalia Jackson have been captured by Friedlander's disarming lens, and Sweet Emma Barrett, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Johnny St. Cyr, and other luminaries are seen in their homes and the back rooms in which they gathered to play. Also included are photographs of the city's second-line parades, whose jubilant dancing has long been a defining aspect of New Orleans jazz culture.

  • Louis I. Kahn in Conversation - Interviews with John W. Cook and Heinrich Klotz, 1969-70

    In 1969 and 1970, Louis I. Kahn (1901 1974) - one of America's greatest 20th century architects - participated in a series of interviews with a young German architectural historian, Heinrich Klotz, then a visiting professor at Yale University, and John W. Cook, a graduate student who was teaching architecture at the Yale Divinity School. 'Louis I. Kahn in Conversation' provides the first full edited transcript of these candid, illuminating interviews, which provide remarkable insights into Kahn's philosophy of architecture. The conversations touch on many of his iconic works, including the unbuilt City Tower Project for Philadelphia, the Yale University Art Gallery, the First Unitarian Church in Rochester, and major international projects then under construction, as well as the Yale Center for British Art, Kahn's final building, on which he was beginning work at the time. Illustrated with dozens of plans, drawings and photographs, the book also features an introduction by Jules David Prown, the first director of the Yale Center for British Art, who recommended Kahn as its architect.

  • Buddhist Art of Myanmar

    A stunning showcase of exceptional and rare works of Buddhist art, presented to the international community for the first time

    The practice of Buddhism in Myanmar (Burma) has resulted in the production of dazzling objects since the 5th century. This landmark publication presents the first overview of these magnificent works of art from major museums in Myanmar and collections in the United States, including sculptures, paintings, textiles, and religious implements created for temples and monasteries, or for personal devotion. Many of these pieces have never before been seen outside of Myanmar.

    Accompanied by brilliant color photography, essays by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Donald M. Stadtner, and scholars from around the world synthesize the history of Myanmar from the ancient through colonial periods and discuss the critical links between religion, geography, governance, historiography, and artistic production. The authors examine the multiplicity of styles and techniques throughout the country, the ways Buddhist narratives have been conveyed through works of art, and the context in which the diverse objects were used. Certain to be the essential resource on the subject, Buddhist Art of Myanmar illuminates two millennia of rarely seen masterpieces.

  • Visions of a Vanished World - The Extraordinary Fossils of the Hunsrate

    A spectacular collectible volume, with masterful photographs and expert commentary on some of the world's most striking fossils

    About four hundred million years ago earthquake activity and possibly major storms caused sudden movements of large quantities of muddy sediment along the seafloor. Animal communities in the path of these sediment-laden flows were instantly engulfed, the inhabitants "frozen" in the last moment of their lives. Amazingly, many of the creatures lost in this ancient catastrophe were almost perfectly preserved through the eons, fossilized in a thick series of muds now known as the Hunsruck Slate west of the Rhine Valley in western Germany. Excavations there have yielded the most diverse and surpassingly beautiful collection of marine fossils of the Devonian period ever discovered.

    This book pays tribute to the exquisite fossils of the Hunsruck Slate. Large full-color photographic plates display fossil sponges, brachiopods, clams, starfish, sea lilies, trilobites, worms, sea spiders, sea stars, crustaceans, corals, and many other species. An accessible commentary recounts the discovery of the fossils and explains how the slate was formed, how the animals are preserved, the significance of the fossils, and the controversies that surround them. A special presentation in every way, this book makes an exceptional contribution to the fascinating history of life on Earth.

  • A Little History of Literature

    A much-loved author brings the world of literature alive for all ages

    This 'little history' takes on a very big subject: the glorious span of literature from Greek myth to graphic novels, from The Epic of Gilgamesh to Harry Potter. John Sutherland is perfectly suited to the task. He has researched, taught, and written on virtually every area of literature, and his infectious passion for books and reading has defined his own life. Now he guides young readers and the grown-ups in their lives on an entertaining journey 'through the wardrobe' to a greater awareness of how literature from across the world can transport us and help us to make sense of what it means to be human.

    Sutherland introduces great classics in his own irresistible way, enlivening his offerings with humor as well as learning: Beowulf, Shakespeare, Don Quixote, the Romantics, Dickens, Moby Dick, The Waste Land, Woolf, 1984, and dozens of others. He adds to these a less-expected, personal selection of authors and works, including literature usually considered well below 'serious attention' - from the rude jests of Anglo-Saxon runes to The Da Vinci Code. With masterful digressions into various themes - censorship, narrative tricks, self-publishing, taste, creativity, and madness - Sutherland demonstrates the full depth and intrigue of reading. For younger readers, he offers a proper introduction to literature, promising to interest as much as instruct. For more experienced readers, he promises just the same.

  • Why Acting Matters

    A provocative, highly engaging essay on the art of pretending on the stage, on screen, and in daily life

    Does acting matter? David Thomson, one of our most respected and insightful writers on movies and theater, answers this question with intelligence and wit. In this fresh and thought-provoking essay, Thomson tackles this most elusive of subjects, examining the allure of the performing arts for both the artist and the audience member while addressing the paradoxes inherent in acting itself. He reflects on the casting process, on stage versus film acting, and on the cult of celebrity. The art and considerable craft of such gifted artists as Meryl Streep, Laurence Olivier, Vivien Leigh, Marlon Brando, Daniel Day-Lewis, and others are scrupulously appraised here, as are notions of "good" and "bad" acting.

    Thomson's exploration is at once a meditation on and a celebration of a unique and much beloved, often misunderstood, and occasionally derided art form. He argues that acting not only "matters" but is essential and inescapable, as well as dangerous, chronic, transformative, and exhilarating, be it on the theatrical stage, on the movie screen, or as part of our everyday lives.

  • God′s Last Words - Reading the English Bible from the Reformation of Fundamentalism

    This wide-ranging book is an intellectual history of how informed readers read their Bibles over the past four hundred years, from the first translations in the sixteenth century to the emergence of fundamentalism in the twentieth century. David Katz re-creates the response of readers from different eras by examining the "horizon of expectations" that provided the lens through which they read.
    During the Renaissance, says Katz, learned men rushed to apply the tools of textual analysis to the Testaments, fully confident that God's Word would open up and reveal shades of further truth. Other developments that altered readers' experiences included the politics of the English Civil War, Newtonian and Darwinian scientific theory, the rise of the disciplines of anthropology, archaeology, and geology, and the development of the novel and a concept of authorial copyright. Katz discusses all of these and more, concluding with the growth of fundamentalism in America, which brought biblical interpretation back to the Lutheran certainty of a demonstrable authority.

  • Rediscovering the Ancient World on the Bay of Naples, 1710-1890

    The ancient Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 C.E., drew international attention when excavations commenced in the 1730s. As a result, the nearby city of Naples became a nexus of scholarship, cultural diplomacy, and tourism. This fascinating book examines responses to the excavations by 18th- and 19th-century monarchs, statesmen, scholars, and archaeologists, as well as by artists, architects, designers, writers, and tourists.

    Essays by leading art historians and archaeologists chronicle the exploitation of the sites through excavation, publication, and museum display, and discuss the wider influence of the recovered objects and architectural remains on art and design in Italy, France, Germany, and Britain. Unlike other publications that focus on the archaeological artifacts and their documentation, this extensively illustrated book presents the discoveries from the standpoint of how they were understood at the time.

  • Vietnam - Rising Dragon

    A much-needed behind-the-scenes survey of an emerging Asian power

    The eyes of the West have recently been trained on China and India, but Vietnam is rising fast among its Asian peers. A breathtaking period of social change has seen foreign investment bringing capitalism flooding into its nominally communist society, booming cities swallowing up smaller villages, and the lure of modern living tugging at the traditional networks of family and community. Yet beneath these sweeping developments lurks an authoritarian political system that complicates the nation's apparent renaissance. In this engaging work, experienced journalist Bill Hayton looks at the costs of change in Vietnam and questions whether this rising Asian power is really heading toward capitalism and democracy.

    Based on vivid eyewitness accounts and pertinent case studies, Hayton's book addresses a broad variety of issues in today's Vietnam, including important shifts in international relations, the growth of civil society, economic developments and challenges, and the nation's nascent democracy movement as well as its notorious internal security. His analysis of Vietnam's "police state," and its systematic mechanisms of social control, coercion, and surveillance, is fresh and particularly imperative when viewed alongside his portraits of urban and street life, cultural legacies, religion, the media, and the arts. With a firm sense of historical and cultural context, Hayton examines how these issues have emerged and where they will lead Vietnam in the next stage of its development.

  • Erwin Blumenteld

    A revelatory book about the life and work of an important fashion photographer and artist

    Erwin Blumenfeld (1897-1969) was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. His work offers a unique perspective on the society and politics of the 1930s through the 60s. Born in Berlin, Blumenfeld's peripatetic career took him first to Amsterdam and then to Paris, where his work in fashion photography began at Vogue in 1938. After two years in a French concentration camp, he made his way to the United States and established himself as an eminent fashion photographer. Over one hundred of his photographs featured on the covers of prominent fashion and general interest magazines, including Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Life, Look, and Cosmopolitan. Often minimalist, mainly in color, these photographs testify to Blumenfeld's lifelong interest in experimentation.

    This landmark publication broadens our understanding of Blumenfeld's innovations, reuniting all the media used by the artist throughout his long career: drawing, photography, photomontage, and collage. The motifs of his experimental, sometimes overtly political, black-and-white photographs appear alongside numerous self-portraits and celebrity portraits, as well as the fashion photographs for which he is most known. Presenting some 150 images, this book provides a fresh understanding of Blumenfeld's photography for the commercial worlds of fashion and advertising.

  • How to Read Literature

    What makes a work of literature good or bad? How freely can the reader interpret it? Could a nursery rhyme like Baa Baa Black Sheep be full of concealed loathing, resentment, and aggression? In this accessible, delightfully entertaining book, Terry Eagleton addresses these intriguing questions and a host of others. How to Read Literature is the book of choice for students new to the study of literature and for all other readers interested in deepening their understanding and enriching their reading experience. In a series of brilliant analyses, Eagleton shows how to read with due attention to tone, rhythm, texture, syntax, allusion, ambiguity, and other formal aspects of literary works. He also examines broader questions of character, plot, narrative, the creative imagination, the meaning of fictionality, and the tension between what works of literature say and what they show. Unfailingly authoritative and cheerfully opinionated, the author provides useful commentaries on classicism, Romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism along with spellbinding insights into a huge range of authors, from Shakespeare and J. K. Rowling to Jane Austen and Samuel Beckett.

  • Gates of Light - Sha′are Orah

    Until now, few primary texts on the Kabbalah have been available in English. Under the auspices of the Bronfman Library of Jewish Classics, this historic publicatin of Gates of Light allows readers to enter the hidden world of the Kabbalah and its profound and beautiful Biblical interpretation. This central text of Jewish mysticism was written in thirteenth-century Spain, where Kabbalah flourished. Considered to be the most articulate work on the mystical Kabbalah, Gates of Light provides a systematic and comprehensive explanation of the Names of God and their mystical applications. The Kabbalah presents a unique strategy for intimacy with the Creator and new insights into the Hebrew scriptures. In the Kabbalah, aspects of God emanate from the hierarchy of Ten Spheres interconnected by channels that may be disrupted or repaired through human activity.

  • Elegant Perfection - Masterpieces of Courtly and Religious Art from the Tokyo National Museum

    As the oldest and largest museum in Japan, the Tokyo National Museum houses a vast collection of culturally important artworks. 'Elegant Perfection' highlights twenty-six masterpieces from this esteemed collection, and together these objects tell the story of the country's artistic development from the prehistoric Jomon era through the 19th century. Essays by experts at the Tokyo National Museum offer insights into how Buddhist art evolved in Japan, and how the aesthetics valued by Japanese courtly society, initially influenced by Chinese Tang culture, gradually became more distinctly Japanese. Harvard scholar Melissa McCormick contributes an essay that demonstrates the connections between the realms of courtly and religious art in Japan. The featured works include exquisite examples of painting, sculpture, calligraphy, metalwork, ceramics and lacquerware. Among them are an 11th-century inscribed poetry compilation, deemed a National Treasure by the Japanese government, lacquered musical instruments, Edo-period ceramics produced for tea ceremonies, and Buddhist sculpture, painting, and ritual objects. This publication offers a rare opportunity to discover the history and significance of these treasured works of art.

  • Death

    There is one thing we can be sure of: we are all going to die. But once we accept that fact, the questions begin. In this thought-provoking book, philosophy professor Shelly Kagan examines the myriad questions that arise when we confront the meaning of mortality. Do we have reason to believe in the existence of immortal souls? Or should we accept an account according to which people are just material objects, nothing more? Can we make sense of the idea of surviving the death of one's body? If I won't exist after I die, can death truly be bad for me? Would immortality be desirable? Is fear of death appropriate? Is suicide ever justified? How should I live in the face of death?

    Written in an informal and conversational style, this stimulating and provocative book challenges many widely held views about death, as it invites the reader to take a fresh look at one of the central features of the human condition--the fact that we will die.

  • Gothic Wonder - Art, Artifice and the Decorated Style, 1290-1350

    In this wide-ranging, eloquent book, Paul Binski sheds new light on one of the greatest periods of English art and architecture, offering ground-breaking arguments about the role of invention and the powers of Gothic art. His richly documented study locates what became known as the Decorated Style within patterns of commissioning, designing, and imagining whose origins lay in pre-Gothic art. By examining notions of what was extraordinary, re-evaluating medieval ideas of authorship, and restoring economic considerations to the debate, Binski sets English visual art of the early 14th century in a broad European context and also within the aesthetic discourses of the medieval period. The author, stressing the continuum between art and architecture, challenges understandings about agency, modernity, hierarchy, and marginality. His book makes a powerful case for the restoration of the category of the aesthetic to the understanding of medieval art. Generously illustrated with hundreds of images, Gothic Wonder traces the impact of English art in Continental Europe, ending with the Black Death and the literary uses of the architectural in works by Geoffrey Chaucer and other writers.

  • A Reader on Reading

    An intimate and exhilarating journey through the world of books by the internationally celebrated author

    In this major collection of his essays, Alberto Manguel, whom George Steiner has called "the Casanova of reading," argues that the activity of reading, in its broadest sense, defines our species. "We come into the world intent on finding narrative in everything," writes Manguel, "landscape, the skies, the faces of others, the images and words that our species create." Reading our own lives and those of others, reading the societies we live in and those that lie beyond our borders, reading the worlds that lie between the covers of a book are the essence of A Reader on Reading.

    The thirty-nine essays in this volume explore the crafts of reading and writing, the identity granted to us by literature, the far-reaching shadow of Jorge Luis Borges, to whom Manguel read as a young man, and the links between politics and books and between books and our bodies. The powers of censorship and intellectual curiosity, the art of translation, and those "numinous memory palaces we call libraries" also figure in this remarkable collection. For Manguel and his readers, words, in spite of everything, lend coherence to the world and offer us "a few safe places, as real as paper and as bracing as ink," to grant us room and board in our passage.

  • King Stephen - Yale English Monarchs

    This compelling new biography provides the most authoritative picture yet of King Stephen, whose reign (1135-1154), with its "nineteen long winters" of civil war, made his name synonymous with failed leadership. After years of work on the sources, Edmund King shows with rare clarity the strengths and weaknesses of the monarch. Keeping Stephen at the forefront of his account, the author also chronicles the activities of key family members and associates whose loyal support sustained Stephen's kingship. In 1135 the popular Stephen was elected king against the claims of the empress Matilda and her sons. But by 1153, Stephen had lost control over Normandy and other important regions, England had lost prestige, and the weakened king was forced to cede his family's right to succession. A rich narrative covering the drama of a tumultuous reign, this book focuses well-deserved attention on a king who lost control of his destiny.

  • Maynard L. Parker - Modern Photography and the American Dream

    A fascinating look at the work of a photographer whose images documented and shaped the American suburban aesthetic following the Second World War

    As a prolific photographer for House Beautiful, Better Homes and Gardens, Architectural Digest, and Sunset magazine, Maynard L. Parker (1900-1976) was a pioneer in documenting residential spaces and landscapes for postwar America. His extensively published, sun-kissed brand of photography made him a critical contributor to domestic design culture from the 1940s into the 1960s. Parker's lens revealed the homes and lifestyles of affluent Americans and celebrities, including Judy Garland, Clark Gable, and Bing Crosby, as well as the interiors, gardens, and built works of Samuel Marx, Frank Lloyd Wright, Thomas Church, and Cliff May, offering an alluring template for living in a new consumer age.

    Maynard L. Parker: Modern Photography and the American Dream is the first monograph to consider Parker and his work. Lavishly illustrated essays by leading scholars set Parker's photography against the backdrop of an unprecedented demographic shift, the Cold War, and a suburban society increasingly fixated on consumption.

  • Michael Snow - Photo-Centric

    Canadian filmmaker and artist Michael Snow (b. 1928) is known as a pioneer of conceptualist and multimedia practice. His seminal film Wavelength (1967), described as a "45-minute zoom," investigates the relationship between time and space, a subject the artist has explored throughout his career in a variety of mediums. Although considered one of the most important experimental filmmakers of his generation, Snow is less known in the United States for his visual art, including photography.

    Michael Snow: Photo-Centric focuses on a selection of the artist's photographic work from 1962 to the present. The book considers Snow's interest in late modernism's self-reflexivity and, specifically, his exploration of how the mechanics of photography affect perception, cognition, and consciousness. Essays by Adelina Vlas and the artist himself consider the importance of Snow's photographic work within his larger practice, its connection with and continuation of modernist ideas, and its experimental quality within the history of the medium.

  • Einstein - His Space and Times

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a revealing new portrait of Albert Einstein, the world's first scientific "superstar"

    The commonly held view of Albert Einstein is of an eccentric genius for whom the pursuit of science was everything. But in actuality, the brilliant innovator whose Theory of Relativity forever reshaped our understanding of time was a man of his times, always politically engaged and driven by strong moral principles. An avowed pacifist, Einstein's mistrust of authority and outspoken social and scientific views earned him death threats from Nazi sympathizers in the years preceding World War II. To him, science provided not only a means for understanding the behavior of the universe, but a foundation for considering the deeper questions of life and a way for the worldwide Jewish community to gain confidence and pride in itself.

    Steven Gimbel's biography presents Einstein in the context of the world he lived in, offering a fascinating portrait of a remarkable individual who remained actively engaged in international affairs throughout his life. This revealing work not only explains Einstein's theories in understandable terms, it demonstrates how they directly emerged from the realities of his times and helped create the world we live in today.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent" -New York Times

    "Exemplary" -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished" -New Yorker

    "Superb" -The Guardian

  • The Shahnama of Shah Tahmasp - The Persian Book of Kings

    A smaller, more accessible version of the 2011 sold-out deluxe edition, with beautiful illustrations and informative supplementary texts

    The Shahnama, an epic poem from the 10th century that chronicles Iran's mythical history before the founding of Islam, has been immortalized in numerous illustrated copies. . The illuminated pages of the 16th-century Shahnama of Shah Tahmasp, known as the most beautiful edition ever created, are reproduced in this new publication, which succeeds the Metropolitan Museum's celebrated out-of-print deluxe facsimile edition of 2011. This new volume combines the vibrant, high-quality reproductions of the deluxe edition with enlightening information and a smaller, more accessible format. The fascinating text introduces the Shahnama to readers and describes the material world depicted in the intricate paintings. It also includes a brief description of the stories depicted in the illustrations and an illustrated "Who's Who" to help readers identify major characters in the epic. These features provide readers a deeper engagement with this captivating masterpiece.

  • Paul Thek - Diver, A Retrospective

    An American sculptor, painter, and installation artist, Paul Thek (1933-1988) is primarily known for hyper-realistic works of human body parts executed in fleshlike beeswax and for his strongly symbolic, room-size installations constructed from transitory materials. A major figure on the 1960s New York art scene, Thek also spent time in Europe, where he paved the way for artists adopting collaborative strategies. Although he gained a large following and was featured in more than one hundred solo and group exhibitions, the anti-establishment artists artist was practically forgotten at the time of his death. Major exhibitions abroad and critical attention from younger artists have done much to revive his reputation, and Paul Thek: Diver expands on those efforts by bringing the artists resounding influence on the art world up to date. Published to accompany Theks first retrospective in the United States, this landmark publication includes nearly 300 chronologically arranged illustrations of sculptures, paintings, prints, and other works featured in the exhibition as well as four special in-depth image sections focusing on key installations, projects, and pages from the artists journals. An extensive selection of documentary photographs, many never before published, illuminate Theks artistic aesthetic and production process. With a bibliography, exhibition history, and checklist of works in the exhibition, this overdue acknowledgment of Theks brief, but broad-reaching career will be the authoritative volume on the artist for years to come.

  • The Genius - Elijah of Vilna and the Making of Modern Judaism

    Elijah ben Solomon, the "Genius of Vilna," was perhaps the best-known and most understudied figure in modern Jewish history. This book offers a new narrative of Jewish modernity based on Elijah's life and influence. While the experience of Jews in modernity has often been described as a process of Western European secularization-with Jews becoming citizens of Western nation-states, congregants of reformed synagogues, and assimilated members of society-Stern uses Elijah's story to highlight a different theory of modernization for European life. Religious movements such as Hasidism and anti-secular institutions such as the yeshiva emerged from the same democratization of knowledge and privatization of religion that gave rise to secular and universal movements and institutions. Claimed by traditionalists, enlighteners, Zionists, and the Orthodox, Elijah's genius and its afterlife capture an all-embracing interpretation of the modern Jewish experience. Through the story of the "Vilna Gaon," Stern presents a new model for understanding modern Jewish history and more generally the place of traditionalism and religious radicalism in modern Western life and thought.

  • Punk - Chaos to Couture

    The provocative punk aesthetic and its incendiary influence on high fashion

    Since its origins in the 1970s, punk has had an explosive influence on fashion. With its eclectic mixing of stylistic references, punk effectively introduced the postmodern concept of bricolage to the elevated precincts of haute couture and directional ready-to-wear. As a style, punk is about chaos, anarchy, and rebellion. Drawing on provocative sexual and political imagery, punks made fashion overtly hostile and threatening. This aesthetic of violence - even of cruelty - was intrinsic to the clothes themselves, which were often customized with rips, tears, and slashes, as well as studs, spikes, zippers, D-Rings, safety pins, and razor blades, among other things.

    This extraordinary publication examines the impact of punk's aesthetic of brutality on high fashion, focusing on its do-it-yourself, rip-it-to-shreds ethos, the antithesis of couture's made-to-measure exactitude. Indeed, punk's democracy stands in opposition to fashion's autocracy. Yet, as this book reveals, even haute couture has readily appropriated the visual and symbolic language of punk, replacing beads with studs, paillettes with safety pins, and feathers with razor blades in an attempt to capture the style's rebellious energy. Focusing on high fashion's embrace of punk's aesthetic vocabulary, this book reveals how designers have looked to the quintessential anti-establishment style to originate new ideals of beauty and fashionability.

  • Pagan Britain

    Britain's pagan past, with its mysterious monuments, atmospheric sites, enigmatic artifacts, bloodthirsty legends, and cryptic inscriptions, is both enthralling and perplexing to a resident of the twenty-first century. In this ambitious and thoroughly up-to-date book, Ronald Hutton reveals the long development, rapid suppression, and enduring cultural significance of paganism, from the Paleolithic Era to the coming of Christianity. He draws on an array of recently discovered evidence and shows how new findings have radically transformed understandings of belief and ritual in Britain before the arrival of organized religion. Setting forth a chronological narrative, Hutton along the way makes side visits to explore specific locations of ancient pagan activity. He includes the well-known sacred sites--Stonehenge, Avebury, Seahenge, Maiden Castle, Anglesey--as well as more obscure locations across the mainland and coastal islands. In tireless pursuit of the elusive "why" of pagan behavior, Hutton astonishes with the breadth of his understanding of Britain's deep past and inspires with the originality of his insights.

  • The Double-Crested Cormorant - Plight of a Feathered Pariah

    The tragic history of the cormorant's relations with humans and the implications for today's wildlife management policy

    The double-crested cormorant, found only in North America, is an iridescent black waterbird superbly adapted to catch fish. It belongs to a family of birds vilified since biblical times and persecuted around the world. Thus it was perhaps to be expected that the first European settlers in North America quickly deemed the double-crested cormorant a competitor for fishing stock and undertook a relentless drive to destroy the birds. This enormously important book explores the roots of human-cormorant conflicts, dispels myths about the birds, and offers the first comprehensive assessment of the policies that have been developed to manage the double-crested cormorant in the twenty-first century.

    Conservation biologist Linda Wires provides a unique synthesis of the cultural, historical, scientific, and political elements of the cormorant's story. She discusses the amazing late-twentieth-century population recovery, aided by protection policies and environment conservation, but also the subsequent U.S. federal policies under which hundreds of thousands of the birds have been killed. In a critique of the science, management, and ethics underlying the double-crested cormorant's treatment today, Wires exposes "management" as a euphemism for persecution and shows that the current strategies of aggressive predator control are outdated and unsupported by science.

  • Four Centuries of Quilts - The Colonial Williamsburg Collection

    An exquisite and authoritative look at four centuries of quilts and quilting from around the world

    Quilts are among the most utilitarian of art objects, yet the best among them possess a formal beauty that rivals anything made on canvas. This landmark book, drawn from the world-renowned collection of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, highlights the splendor and craft of quilts with more than 300 superb color images and details. Fascinating essays by two noted scholars trace the evolution of quilting styles and trends as they relate to the social, political, and economic issues of their time.

    The collection includes quilts made by diverse religious and cultural groups over 400 years and across continents, from the Mediterranean, England, France, America, and Polynesia. The earliest quilts were made in India and the Mediterranean for export to the west and date to the late 16th century. Examples from 18th- to 20th-century America, many made by Amish and African-American quilters, reflect the multicultural nature of American society and include boldly colored and patterned worsteds and brilliant pieced and appliqued works of art.

    Grand in scope and handsomely produced, Four Centuries of Quilts: The Colonial Williamsburg Collection is sure to be one of the most useful and beloved references on quilts and quilting for years to come.

  • 1688

    Based on new archival information, this book upends two hundred years of scholarship on England's Glorious Revolution to claim that it--not the French Revolution--was the first truly modern revolution

    For two hundred years historians have viewed England's Glorious Revolution of 1688-1689 as an un-revolutionary revolution--bloodless, consensual, aristocratic, and above all, sensible. In this brilliant new interpretation Steve Pincus refutes this traditional view.

    By expanding the interpretive lens to include a broader geographical and chronological frame, Pincus demonstrates that England's revolution was a European event, that it took place over a number of years, not months, and that it had repercussions in India, North America, the West Indies, and throughout continental Europe. His rich historical narrative, based on masses of new archival research, traces the transformation of English foreign policy, religious culture, and political economy that, he argues, was the intended consequence of the revolutionaries of 1688-1689.

    James II developed a modernization program that emphasized centralized control, repression of dissidents, and territorial empire. The revolutionaries, by contrast, took advantage of the new economic possibilities to create a bureaucratic but participatory state. The postrevolutionary English state emphasized its ideological break with the past and envisioned itself as continuing to evolve. All of this, argues Pincus, makes the Glorious Revolution--not the French Revolution--the first truly modern revolution. This wide-ranging book reenvisions the nature of the Glorious Revolution and of revolutions in general, the causes and consequences of commercialization, the nature of liberalism, and ultimately the origins and contours of modernity itself.

  • Infinite Jest - Caricature and Satire from Leonardo to Levine

    From Leonardo's drawings of grotesque heads to contemporary prints lampooning American politicians, the Metropolitan Museum has a vast and largely unknown collection of caricatures and satirical works. This handsome volume offers 160 examples dating from about 1500 to the present - many of them previously unpublished - that reflect the age-old tradition of employing exaggeration and humour to convey personal, social or political meaning. Stressing the continuity of certain artistic approaches, 'Infinite Jest' examines the development of the genre across a broad expanse of centuries. The basic visual components of caricature are discussed and illustrated, as are significant themes such as physical types, people as animals or objects, social satire (food, fashion, and foreigners), and politics (British, French and American). Artists as well known as Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, William Hogarth, Francisco de Goya, Thomas Rowlandson, Eugene Delacroix, Honore Daumier and David Levine contribute their distinctive talents to this fascinating and very amusing compilation.

  • Sarah - The Life of Sarah Bernhardt

    A riveting portrait of the great Sarah Bernhardt from acclaimed writer Robert Gottlieb

    Everything about Sarah Bernhardt is fascinating, from her obscure birth to her glorious career--redefining the very nature of her art--to her amazing (and highly public) romantic life to her indomitable spirit. Well into her seventies, after the amputation of her leg, she was performing under bombardment for soldiers during World War I, as well as crisscrossing America on her ninth American tour.

    Her family was also a source of curiosity: the mother she adored and who scorned her; her two half-sisters, who died young after lives of dissipation; and most of all, her son, Maurice, whom she worshiped and raised as an aristocrat, in the style appropriate to his presumed father, the Belgian Prince de Ligne. Only once did they quarrel--over the Dreyfus Affair. Maurice was a right-wing snob; Sarah, always proud of her Jewish heritage, was a passionate Dreyfusard and Zolaist.

    Though the Bernhardt literature is vast, Gottlieb's Sarah is the first English-language biography to appear in decades. Brilliantly, it tracks the trajectory through which an illegitimate--and scandalous--daughter of a courtesan transformed herself into the most famous actress who ever lived, and into a national icon, a symbol of France.

  • Thomas Aquinas - A Portrait

    A concise and illuminating introduction to the elusive Thomas Aquinas, the man and the saint

    Leaving so few traces of himself behind, Thomas Aquinas seems to defy the efforts of the biographer. Highly visible as a public teacher, preacher, and theologian, he nevertheless has remained nearly invisible as man and saint. What can be discovered about Thomas Aquinas as a whole? In this short, compelling portrait, Denys Turner clears away the haze of time and brings Thomas vividly to life for contemporary readers--those unfamiliar with the saint as well as those well acquainted with his teachings.

    Building on the best biographical scholarship available today and reading the works of Thomas with piercing acuity, Turner seeks the point at which the man, the mind, and the soul of Thomas Aquinas intersect. Reflecting upon Thomas, a man of Christian Trinitarian faith yet one whose thought is grounded firmly in the body's interaction with the material world, a thinker at once confident in the powers of human reason and a man of prayer, Turner provides a more detailed human portrait than ever before of one of the most influential philosophers and theologians in all of Western thought.

  • Aberdeenshire: North and Moray - The Buildings of Scotland

    This volume is the first of two to illuminate the buildings of the northeast of Scotland. It covers not only Aberdeenshire's historic districts of Formartine, Buchan, and Banff but also the whole of Moray. Picturesque former fishing villages cling to the rugged coastline, while the inland rivers support some of the most famous whisky distilleries in Scotland. Also included are examples of the finest medieval ecclesiastical architecture, notably the ruins of Elgin Cathedral, major country houses such as Brodie Castle and Duff House, as well as the churches and public buildings of the numerous planned settlements, villages, and major towns.

  • James Frazer Stirling - Notes from the Archive

    The British architect James Frazer Stirling (1924-1992) stimulated impassioned responses among both supporters and detractors, and he continues to be the subject of fierce debate. He earned international renown through such innovative and frequently controversial projects as the Leicester University Engineering building (1959-63); the History Faculty building at Cambridge University (1964-67); the Neue Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart (1977-84); the Clore Gallery at Tate Britain (1984); and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum at Harvard University (1979-84). Stirling was also a visiting professor at the Yale School of Architecture where he trained and influenced many of the current leaders in the field. Fully illustrated with previously unpublished documents and new photography from the James Stirling/Michael Wilford Archive at the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal, this book allows for a close examination of design drawings, photographs, and models spanning Stirling's entire career. These materials deepen our understanding of the influences, early formation, approach, and process of an architect whose work resists labelling. Filled with in-depth analytical and critical presentations of exemplary projects and their reception, the volume reveals Stirling to be a remarkably informed and consistent thinker and writer on architecture.

  • Introduction to New Testament History and Literature

    In this engaging introduction to the New Testament, Professor Dale B. Martin presents a historical study of the origins of Christianity by analyzing the literature of the earliest Christian movements. Focusing mainly on the New Testament, he also considers nonbiblical Christian writings of the era.

    Martin begins by making a powerful case for the study of the New Testament. He next sets the Greco-Roman world in historical context and explains the place of Judaism within it. In the discussion of each New Testament book that follows, the author addresses theological themes, then emphasizes the significance of the writings as ancient literature and as sources for historical study. Throughout the volume, Martin introduces various early Christian groups and highlights the surprising variations among their versions of Christianity.

  • Susan Sontag - The Complete Rolling Stone Interview

    Published in its entirety for the first time, a candid conversation with Susan Sontag at the height of her brilliant career

    "One of my oldest crusades is against the distinction between thought and feeling, which is really the basis of all anti-intellectual views: the heart and the head, thinking and feeling, fantasy and judgment . . . and I don't believe it's true. . . . I have the impression that thinking is a form of feeling and that feeling is a form of thinking."

    Susan Sontag, one of the most internationally renowned and controversial intellectuals of the latter half of the twentieth century, still provokes. In 1978 Jonathan Cott, a founding contributing editor of Rolling Stone magazine, interviewed Sontag first in Paris and later in New York. Only a third of their twelve hours of discussion ever made it to print. Now, more than three decades later, Yale University Press is proud to publish the entire transcript of Sontag's remarkable conversation, accompanied by Cott's preface and recollections. Sontag's musings and observations reveal the passionate engagement and breadth of her critical intelligence and curiosities at a moment when she was at the peak of her powers. Nearly a decade after her death, these hours of conversation offer a revelatory and indispensable look at the self-described "besotted aesthete" and "obsessed moralist."

    "I really believe in history, and that's something people don't believe in anymore. I know that what we do and think is a historical creation. . . .We were given a vocabulary that came into existence at a particular moment. So when I go to a Patti Smith concert, I enjoy, participate, appreciate, and am tuned in better because I've read Nietzsche."

    "There's no incompatibility between observing the world and being tuned into this electronic, multimedia, multi-tracked, McLuhanite world and enjoying what can be enjoyed. I love rock and roll. Rock and roll changed my life. . . .You know, to tell you the truth, I think rock and roll is the reason I got divorced. I think it was Bill Haley and the Comets and Chuck Berry that made me decide that I had to get a divorce and leave the academic world and start a new life."


  • Space, Hope and Brutalism - English Architecture, 1945-1975

    This is the first major book to study English architecture between 1945 and 1975 in its entirety. Challenging previous scholarship on the subject and uncovering vast amounts of new material at the boundaries between architectural and social history, Elain Harwood structures the book around building types to reveal why the architecture takes the form it does. Buildings of all budgets and styles are examined, from major universities to the modest cafe. The book is illustrated with stunning new photography that reveals the logic, aspirations, and beauty of hundreds of buildings throughout England, at the point where many are disappearing or are being mutilated.

    Space, Hope, and Brutalism offers a convincing and lively overview of a subject and period that fascinates younger scholars and appeals to those who were witnesses to this history.

  • Cripplewood/Kreupelhout

    Berlinde De Bruyckere (b. 1964) is a Belgian artist who specializes in sculpture using various media, including wax, wood, wool, and horse skin and hair. Published to coincide with De Bruyckere's participation in the 2013 Venice Biennale, this richly illustrated catalogue traces her work from conception to installation, providing a multifaceted introduction to the artist's complex and compelling work.

    Struck by the passion and fierce beauty in the writings of J. M. Coetzee, De Bruyckere asked the acclaimed writer to curate the Belgian Pavilion's exhibition. A previously unpublished text by Coetzee is included in this volume, as well as correspondence that the two exchanged throughout their collaborative process. The book is also enriched by writings by Herman Parret, who explores Saint Sebastian--the dual incarnation of sensuality and mystical suffering, and Venice's quintessential symbol--and his particular significance to De Bruyckere's oeuvre.

  • Ink Art - Past and Present in Contemporary China

    An illuminating investigation into how contemporary Chinese artists have reinterpreted past traditions to forge new artistic paths

    The Chinese tradition of "ink art" stretches far beyond works in ink, to embrace a set of aesthetic principles centered on renewal and reinterpretation of the past. The 80 works, by 40 contemporary artists, featured in InkArt range from variations on the written word to radical abstractions to contemporary landscapes, and represent media as diverse as photography, video, ceramic, wood, bronze, and stainless steel--as well as traditional ink (which might be on cardboard, polyester, or the human body). They include such iconic pieces as Book from the Sky by Xu Bing and Han Jar Overpainted with Coca ColaLogo by Ai Weiwei, "pseudo-characters" by Gu Wenda, handscrolls by Liu Dan, and videos and animation by Qiu Anxiong and Chen Shaoxiong. The illuminating texts give a history of contemporary Chinese ink painting and how it is perceived in the West. A discussion of the works themselves show how they respond to, subvert, or reinterpret the traditional idioms to define a modern artistic identity that remains both Chinese and global.

  • Wonder of the Age - Master Painters of India, 1100-1900

    This vividly illustrated publication features 110 works by many of the most eminent painters in the history of Indian art. These remarkable paintings, dating from 1100 to 1900, were selected according to identifiable artists, and they refute the long-held view of anonymous authorship in Indian art.

    Traditionally, Indian paintings have been classified by regional styles or dynastic periods, with an emphasis on subject matter. Stressing the combined tools of connoisseurship and inscriptional evidence, the pioneering research reflected in this book has identified individual artists and their oeuvres through the analysis of style.

    The introductory essay outlines the origins of early Indian painting of the first millennium, which set the scene for the development of the art of the book. The sections that follow examine manuscript painting as it evolved from palm-leaf to paper, the emergence of traditional painting as an independent art form, and its demise with the coming of photography. Biographies of the artists whose works appear in this volume and a glossary of their major literary sources provide valuable context.

  • A Different Democracy - American Government in a 31-Country Perspective

    American democracy differs greatly from other democracies around the world. But is the American way more or less efficacious than comparable democracies in Asia, Latin America, or Europe? What if the United States had a prime minister instead of (or in addition to) a president, or if it had three or more parties in Congress instead of two? Would there be more partisan animosity and legislative gridlock or less? These are the kinds of questions that thinking about U.S. government in comparative perspective helps us to analyze.

    This valuable contribution to political studies takes a unique approach to a much-studied subject, looking at the U.S. government from a comparative point of view. Four distinguished scholars in the field examine the Constitution, the two-party system, the division of power between state and federal governments, and other major features of the American political system in terms of how they differ from other democracies, and they explore what those differences ultimately mean for democratic performance. By merging two important fields of study, American government and comparative political systems, this essential text offers a new and refreshingly insightful view of American exceptionalism.

  • Mountains and Plains - The Ecology of Wyoming Landscapes 2e

    An up-to-date and comprehensive guide to the ecology of Wyoming and adjacent Rocky Mountain states

    Many changes--some discouraging, others hopeful--have occurred in the Rocky Mountain region since this widely acclaimed book was first published twenty years ago. Wildlife habitat has been fragmented at an alarming rate, the once-abundant sage grouse is now a candidate for protection by the Endangered Species Act, invasive plants and insects have become more common, and forest fires occur more frequently. Yet improved approaches to management and conservation have been adopted. For this updated and expanded Second Edition, the authors provide an easy-to-read synthesis of research pertinent to natural resource management, focusing in particular on Wyoming and adjacent parts of neighboring states.

    Exploring the region's wetlands, plains, intermountain basins, foothills, and mountains, along with landscapes of special interest--Greater Yellowstone, the Black Hills, Bear Lodge Mountains, and Devils Tower, the Laramie Basin--the authors discuss an array of land management and conservation issues, always taking into account the implications of climate change. They offer answers to the questions that motivated the writing of this volume: How can ecosystems be used in ways that enable future generations to benefit from them as we have? How can we anticipate and adapt to climate changes while conserving biological diversity?

  • Carl Andre - Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010

    A major retrospective catalogue on the career of minimalist sculptor and poet Carl Andre

    Carl Andre (b. 1935) redefined the parameters of abstract sculpture in the 1960s and 1970s. He was a highly influential voice in the American minimalist movement, recognized for his ordered linear and grid formats. In the early 1960s, Andre's creative focus shifted to writing poetry when he took a job as a freight brakeman and conductor for the Pennsylvania Railroad. His poems echoed and extended the themes in his sculptural work, and his experience with the railroad significantly influenced his choice of materials in later years.

    In this stunning catalogue, which accompanies the first retrospective of Andre's work since 1970, the artist's legacy is examined in eleven essays by international scholars. The book presents a broad range of sculpture made over the past fifty years, including Andre's emblematic floor and corner pieces, highlighting his radical use of standardized units of industrial material such as timber planks, concrete blocks, and metal plates. A vast selection of Andre's previously unpublished concrete poems, together with letters, postcards, ephemera, and documentation of important installations, further complements our understanding of an essential figure in the history of contemporary art.


  • Wunderkammer

    An alluring glimpse into magnificent Cornell-like boxes created by some of the world's leading architects and designers

    Inspired by the idea of the wunderkammer--"wonder-room" or "cabinet of curiosities"--that originated during the Renaissance, world-renowned architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien invited 35 celebrated architects and designers from around the world to create their own wunderkammers, filling boxes with objects that inspire them. This delightful book gathers together the varied, evocative wunderkammers along with accompanying statements by their architect-creators, including such luminaries as Shigeru Ban, Toyo Ito, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Peter Eisenman, Steven Holl, Richard Meier, Murray Moss, Diebedo Francis Kere, Juhani Pallasmaa, Elias Torres, and Peter Zumthor.

    An introduction by Williams and Tsien explains their fascination with the wunderkammer and looks at their own history of collecting. The boxes, each spotlighted in its own section, are explored through each architect's essay; working drawings and sketchbook pages; construction and installation photos; a list of the items contained; and a photograph of the final box. Wunderkammer offers a new way to think about art and inventiveness, collection and meaning in everyday objects.

  • Atheist Delusions - The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies

    Currently it is fashionable to be devoutly undevout. Religion's most passionate antagonists - Christopher Hitchens, Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and others - have publishers competing eagerly to market their various denunciations of religion, monotheism, Christianity and Roman Catholicism. But contemporary antireligious polemics are based not only upon profound conceptual confusions but upon facile simplifications of history or even outright historical ignorance: so contends David Bentley Hart in this bold correction of the distortions. One of the most brilliant scholars of religion of our time, Hart provides a powerful antidote to the New Atheists' misrepresentations of the Christian past, bringing into focus the truth about the most radical revolution in Western history. Hart outlines how Christianity transformed the ancient world in ways we may have forgotten: bringing liberation from fatalism, conferring great dignity on human beings, subverting the cruelest aspects of pagan society and elevating charity above all virtues. He then argues that what we term the 'Age of Reason' was in fact the beginning of the eclipse of reason's authority as a cultural value. Hart closes the book in the present, delineating the ominous consequences of the decline of Christendom in a culture that is built upon its moral and spiritual values.

  • The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux

    Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux (1827--1875) was an extraordinarily gifted sculptor--the greatest in 19th-century France before Rodin--and embodied the emotionally charged artistic climate of his era. The passionate Carpeaux comes alive in this handsome new publication. Carpeaux's wrenching representations of human forms, shown in beautiful color details and illustrations, echo his turbulent personal life, fraught with episodes of violence and fatal illness.

    The book covers the entire span of Carpeaux's career, and includes the masterpiece Ugolino and His Sons, newly discovered drawings, and a number of rarely seen or studied works. Previously unpublished letters between Carpeaux and his family and friends, a wealth of archival material, and the most detailed chronology of the artist's life ever published make this book the definitive resource on the artist and his creations.

  • Regaining Paradise - Englishness and the Early Garden City Movement

    This engaging book considers the British social reform movement at the beginning of the twentieth century through the lens of the garden city movement, a plan to build new communities on open land that would provide a healthy, aesthetically pleasing environment free from overcrowding and pollution. Standish Meacham argues that although the garden city movement initially embodied radical schemes for the reformation of society, it became in the hands of its upper-middle-class proponents a device for maintaining the established order in the face of threatening social change. In the complex clash between conservative and progressive impulses among garden city proponents, conservatism ultimately prevailed.

    Meacham shows that even socialist architects closely associated with the movement and its most famous prewar projects at Letchworth and Hampstead relied for inspiration on the villages of England's pre-industrial squirearchy. The result was the reaffirmation of a particular concept of Englishness that influenced both social policy and urban design.

  • Yitzhak Rabin: Soldier, Leader, Statesman

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, an insider's perspective on the life and influence of Israel's first native-born prime minister, his bold peace initiatives, and his tragic assassination

    More than two decades have passed since prime minister Yitzhak Rabin's assassination in 1995, yet he remains an unusually intriguing and admired modern leader. A native-born Israeli, Rabin became an inextricable part of his nation's pre-state history and subsequent evolution. This revealing account of his life, character, and contributions draws not only on original research but also on the author's recollections as one of Rabin's closest aides.

    An awkward politician who became a statesman, a soldier who became a peacemaker, Rabin is best remembered for his valiant efforts to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and for the Oslo Accords. Itamar Rabinovich provides extraordinary new insights into Rabin's relationships with powerful leaders including Bill Clinton, Jordan's King Hussein, and Henry Kissinger, his desire for an Israeli-Syrian peace plan, and the political developments that shaped his tenure. The author also assesses the repercussions of Rabin's murder: Netanyahu's ensuing election and the rise of Israel's radical right wing.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent." -New York Times

    "Exemplary." -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished." -New Yorker

    "Superb." -The Guardian

  • Augustus: First Emperor of Rome

    The dramatic story of Rome's first emperor, who plunged into Rome's violent power struggles at the age of nineteen, proceeded to destroy all rivals, and more than anyone else created the Roman Empire

    Caesar Augustus' story, one of the most riveting in Western history, is filled with drama and contradiction, risky gambles and unexpected success. Thrusting himself into Rome's extremely violent politics while yet a very young man, Augustus skillfully maneuvered his way through twisting alliances during years of civil war. Named heir to the murdered Julius Caesar, he outwitted and outlasted far more experienced rivals like Antony and Brutus. Ruling supreme, he reinvented himself as a benevolent man of peace and created a new system of government.

    In this highly anticipated biography Goldsworthy puts his deep knowledge of ancient sources to full use, recounting the events of Augustus' long life in greater detail than ever before. Goldsworthy pins down the man behind the myths: a consummate manipulator, propagandist, and showman, both generous and ruthless. Under Augustus' rule the empire prospered, yet his success was never assured and the events of his life unfolded with exciting unpredictability. Goldsworthy captures the passion and savagery, the public image and private struggles of the real man whose epic life continues to influence Western history.

  • Wonder, Image and Cosmos in Medieval Islam

    This original book untangles fundamental confusions about historical relationships among Islam, representational images, and philosophy. Closely examining some of the most meaningful and best preserved premodern illustrated manuscripts of Islamic cosmographies, Persis Berlekamp refutes the assertion often made by other historians of medieval Islamic art that, while representational images did exist, they did not serve religious purposes.

    The author focuses on widely disseminated Islamic images of the wonders of creation, ranging from angels to human-snatching birds, and argues that these illustrated manuscripts aimed to induce wonder at God's creation, as was their stated purpose. She tracks the various ways that images advanced that purpose in the genre's formative milieu--the century and a half following the Mongol conquest of the Islamic East in 1258. Delving into social history and into philosophical ideas relevant to manuscript and image production, Berlekamp shows that philosophy occupied an established, if controversial, position within Islam. She thereby radically reframes representational images within the history of Islam.

  • Cambridgeshire - Buildings of England Series

    This is the essential companion to the architecture of Cambridgeshire, fully revised for the first time in sixty years and featuring superb new photography. Half of the book is devoted to the famous university city, with its astonishingly rich and varied inheritance of college buildings including striking post-war additions. A combination of boldness and innovation may be found at Ely Cathedral, one of the greatest achievements of English medieval design. By comparison, the rest of the county remains surprisingly little known. Its largely unspoiled landscapes vary from the northern flat fen country to the rolling chalk uplands of the south and east; its architecture encompasses rewarding village churches, distinctive vernacular building in timber, stone, and brick, the former monastic sites at Denny and Anglesey, and the magnificent aristocratic seat of Wimpole Hall.

  • William Kent - Designing Georgian Britain

    The most versatile British designer of the 18th century, William Kent (1685-1748) created a style for a new nation and monarchy. The scope of his achievements encompasses architecture, palatial interiors, elaborate gardens, and exquisite furniture. Among his creative innovations are bold combinations of elements from Palladian, rococo, and gothic design, anticipating the intermingling of architectural styles we see today. William Kent: Designing Georgian Britain is the first comprehensive exploration of this important designer and his extraordinary creations.

    An international team of the foremost experts in the field examines the entire spectrum of Kent's oeuvre, including the interiors at Kensington Palace and Houghton Hall. Essays illuminate issues about the authorship of Kent's furniture and metalwork, situate his contributions in relation to architectural discourse, and classify the characteristics of his designs. Copiously illustrated, including many stunning new photographs, this handsome volume celebrates the work and career of one of the most influential figures in the history of architecture and design.

  • Metaphors for Environmental Sustainability - Redefining our Relationship with Nature

    Scientists turn to metaphors to formulate and explain scientific concepts, but an ill-considered metaphor can lead to social misunderstandings and counterproductive policies, Brendon Larson observes in this stimulating book. He explores how metaphors can entangle scientific facts with social values and warns that, particularly in the environmental realm, incautious metaphors can reinforce prevailing values that are inconsistent with desirable sustainability outcomes.

    Metaphors for Environmental Sustainability draws on four case studies--two from nineteenth-century evolutionary science, and two from contemporary biodiversity science--to reveal how metaphors may shape the possibility of sustainability. Arguing that scientists must assume greater responsibility for their metaphors, and that the rest of us must become more critically aware of them, the author urges more critical reflection on the social dimensions and implications of metaphors while offering practical suggestions for choosing among alternative scientific metaphors.

  • The Cost Disease - Why Some Things Keep Getting More Expensive - And why it′s not the Problem we think it is

    The exploding cost of health care in the United States is a source of widespread alarm. Similarly, the upward spiral of college tuition fees is cause for serious concern. In this concise and illuminating book, the well-known economist William J. Baumol explores the causes of these seemingly intractable problems and offers a surprisingly simple explanation. Baumol identifies the "cost disease" as a major source of rapidly rising costs in service sectors of the economy. Once we understand that disease, he explains, effective responses become apparent. Baumol presents his analysis with characteristic clarity, tracing the fast-rising prices of health care and education in the United States and other major industrial nations, then examining the underlying causes, which have to do with the nature of providing labor-intensive services. The news is good, Baumol reassures us, because the nature of the disease is such that society will be able to afford the rising costs.

  • Congress's Constitution: Legislative Authority and the Separation of Powers

    A leading scholar of Congress and the Constitution analyzes Congress's surprisingly potent set of tools in the system of checks and balances.

    Congress is widely supposed to be the least effective branch of the federal government. But as Josh Chafetz shows in this boldly original analysis, Congress in fact has numerous powerful tools at its disposal in its conflicts with the other branches. These tools include the power of the purse, the contempt power, freedom of speech and debate, and more. Drawing extensively on the historical development of Anglo-American legislatures from the seventeenth century to the present, Chafetz concludes that these tools are all means by which Congress and its members battle for public support. When Congress uses them to engage successfully with the public, it increases its power vis-a-vis the other branches; when it does not, it loses power. This groundbreaking take on the separation of powers will be of interest to both legal scholars and political scientists.

  • The Nostalgia Factory

    With a storyteller's gift and a scientist's insights, Draaisma celebrates the unique pleasures of the aging memory

    You cannot call to mind the name of a man you have known for 30 years. You walk into a room and forget what you came for. What is the name of that famous film you've watched so many times? These are common experiences, and as we grow older we tend to worry about these lapses. Is our memory failing? Is it dementia? Douwe Draaisma, a renowned memory specialist, here focuses on memory in later life. Writing with eloquence and humor, he explains neurological phenomena without becoming lost in specialist terminology. His book is reminiscent of Oliver Sacks's work, and not coincidentally this volume includes a long interview with Sacks, who speaks of his own memory changes as he entered his sixties. Draaisma moves smoothly from anecdote to research and back, weaving stories and science into a compelling description of the terrain of memory. He brings to light the "reminiscence effect," just one of the unexpected pleasures of an aging memory. The author writes reassuringly about forgetfulness and satisfyingly dismantles the stubborn myth that mental gymnastics can improve memory. He presents a convincing case in favor of the aging mind and urges us to value the nostalgia that survives as recollection, appreciate the intangible nature of past events, and take pleasure in the consolation of razor-sharp reminiscing.

  • For the Common Good - Principles of American Academic Freedom

    An exploration of the meaning of academic freedom in American higher education

    Debates about academic freedom have become increasingly fierce and frequent. Legislative efforts to regulate American professors proliferate across the nation. Although most American scholars desire to protect academic freedom, they have only a vague and uncertain apprehension of its basic principles and structure. This book offers a concise explanation of the history and meaning of American academic freedom, and it attempts to intervene in contemporary debates by clarifying the fundamental functions and purposes of academic freedom in America.

    Matthew W. Finkin and Robert C. Post trace how the American conception of academic freedom was first systematically articulated in 1915 by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and how this conception was in subsequent years elaborated and applied by Committee A of the AAUP. The authors discuss the four primary dimensions of academic freedom--research and publication, teaching, intramural speech, and extramural speech. They carefully distinguish academic freedom from the kind of individual free speech right that is created by the First Amendment. The authors strongly argue that academic freedom protects the capacity of faculty to pursue the scholar's profession according to the standards of that profession.

  • Artek and the Aaltos: Creating a Modern World

    The first English-language survey to focus on the Finnish Modernist design company Artek and its founders, Alvar and Aino Aalto

    The Finnish design firm Artek is best known as the producer and distributor of Modernist bentwood furniture designed by Alvar Aalto (1898-1976). However, its mission was more complex and multifaceted, grounded in the notion that art and design could enhance everyday life. Artek and the Aaltos showcases more than three hundred objects, including furniture, glassware, lighting, design sketches, drawings, textile swatches, and photographs. Most of the material is published here for the first time. It contextualizes the contributions of Artek, and those of its founders, Alvar and his wife, Aino Marsio Aalto (1894-1949), providing evidence for their close professional partnership as well as critical interpretations of their major projects. It also considers individuals such as Maija Heikenheimo, whose career at Artek spanned three decades. In addition, this book examines the Aaltos' advocacy for the use of standardized forms and shows how modern designers continue to work with the Artek product line and within the parameters of the company's mission. Fully indexed appendices present new scholarship, including an inventory of the Artek product line (furniture, textiles, and glass), and a list of public and private commissions. This book is the first English-language publication on the topic, as well as the most comprehensive, with chapters authored by leading scholars of design history and architecture.

  • Surge of Piety: Norman Vincent Peale and the Remaking of American Religious Life

    The dramatic untold story of how Norman Vincent Peale and a handful of conservative allies fueled the massive rise of religiosity in the United States during the 1950s

    Near the height of Cold War hysteria, when the threat of all-out nuclear war felt real and perilous, American minister Norman Vincent Peale published The Power of Positive Thinking. Selling millions of copies worldwide, the book offered a gospel of self-assurance in an age of mass anxiety.

    Despite Peale's success and his ties to powerful conservatives such as Dwight D. Eisenhower, J. Edgar Hoover, and Joseph McCarthy, the full story of his movement has never been told. Christopher Lane shows how the famed minister's brand of Christian psychology inflamed the nation's religious revival by promoting the concept that belief in God was essential to the health and harmony of all Americans. We learn in vivid detail how Peale and his powerful supporters orchestrated major changes in a nation newly defined as living "under God." This blurring of the lines between religion and medicine would reshape religion as we know it in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

  • Zoe Strauss - 10 Years

    With little formal training as a photographer or artist, Zoe Strauss (b. 1970) founded the Philadelphia Public Art Project in 1995 with the aim of exhibiting art in nontraditional venues. Five years later, she began using photography as the most direct means of representing her chosen subjects. "Zoe Strauss: 10 Years" offers a midcareer assessment of Strauss' achievement to date, and the first full account of her celebrated ten-year project, beginning in 2001, to exhibit her photographs under an elevated section of Interstate 95 in Philadelphia. Strauss' troubling and sometimes touching images focus primarily on American working-class experience, to convey what she calls "an epic narrative that reflects the beauty and struggle of everyday life". Generously illustrated, this book will publish nearly 200 photographs - 135 of them for the first time - along with images that document her I-95 exhibitions. With critical essays by curator Peter Barberie and photography historian Sally Stein, plus a bibliography and chronology, this definitive publication is the first to be produced about this important young artist.

  • Siberia - A History of the People

    Larger in area than the United States and Europe combined, Siberia is a land of extremes, not merely in terms of climate and expanse, but in the many kinds of lives its population has led over the course of four centuries. Janet M. Hartley explores the history of this vast Russian wasteland--whose very name is a common euphemism for remote bleakness and exile--through the lives of the people who settled there, either willingly, desperately, or as prisoners condemned to exile or forced labor in mines or the gulag.

    From the Cossack adventurers' first incursions into "Sibir" in the late sixteenth century to the exiled criminals and political prisoners of the Soviet era to present-day impoverished Russians and entrepreneurs seeking opportunities in the oil-rich north, Hartley's comprehensive history offers a vibrant, profoundly human account of Siberia's development. One of the world's most inhospitable regions is humanized through personal narratives and colorful case studies as ordinary--and extraordinary--everyday life in "the nothingness" is presented in rich and fascinating detail.

  • Make a Joyful Noise - Renaissance Art and Music at Florence Cathedral

    Florence Cathedral, familiarly called Il Duomo, is an architectural masterpiece and home to celebrated works of art. The interrelationship between the brilliant art and architecture and the Cathedral's musical program is explored in depth in this beautiful book. Perhaps the most beloved example is Luca della Robbia's sculptural program for the organ loft, comprising ten sculptural relief panels that depict children singing, dancing, and making music. Luca's charming sculptures are examined alongside luxurious illuminated manuscripts commissioned for musical performances. Essays by distinguished scholars provide new insights into the original function and meaning of Luca's sculptures; organs and organists during the 15th century; the roles played by women and girls--as well as men and boys--in making music throughout Renaissance Florence; and the Cathedral's illuminated choir books.

  • Van Gogh Repetitions

    Popular perceptions of Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) frequently envision the painter working before nature in an intense frenzy, yet the artist's method was often controlled and deliberate. Van Gogh Repetitions is the first book to focus on the artist's "repetitions," a term he used to describe his process of producing more than one version of a composition. Van Gogh ultimately developed a conceptual framework that distinguished his repetitions from copies, etudes, tableaux, and decorations, balancing modernist aspirations toward originality with the creation of copies of his existing compositions. The artist's practice of producing repetitions was far more extensive and vital to his creative process than is commonly recognized.

    In this groundbreaking and beautifully illustrated book, a series of essays considers the many unresolved issues and controversies surrounding the repetitions, including their origins, development, and meaning in van Gogh's art. Technical and analytical examinations provide new insights into the artist's working methods and approach to the creative process.

  • Mark Rothko - Toward the Light in the Chapel

    Mark Rothko was not only one of the most influential American painters of the twentieth century; he was a scholar, an educator, and a deeply spiritual human being. Born Marcus Yakovlevich Rothkowitz, he emigrated from the Russian Empire to the United States at age ten, already well educated in the Talmud and carrying with him bitter memories of the pogroms and persecutions visited upon the Jews of Lithuania. Few artists have achieved success as quickly, and by the mid-twentieth century Rothko's artwork was being displayed in major museums throughout the world. In May 2012 his painting Orange, Red, Yellow was auctioned for nearly $87 million, setting a new Christie's record. Working closely with the artist's son, author Annie Cohen-Solal was granted unprecedented access to personal materials no previous biographer had seen. As a result, her book is an extraordinarily detailed portrait of Rothko the man and the artist, an uncommonly successful painter who was never comfortable with the idea of his art as a commodity.

  • Salvaged Pages - Young Writers` Diaries of the Holocaust, Second Edition

    This stirring collection of diaries written by young people, aged twelve to twenty-two years, during the Holocaust has been fully revised and updated. Some of the writers were refugees, others were in hiding or passing as non-Jews, some were imprisoned in ghettos, and nearly all perished before liberation. This seminal National Jewish Book Award winner preserves the impressions, emotions, and eyewitness reportage of young people whose accounts of daily events and often unexpected thoughts, ideas, and feelings serve to deepen and complicate our understanding of life during the Holocaust.

    The second paperback edition includes a new preface by Alexandra Zapruder examining the book's history and impact. Simultaneously, a multimedia edition incorporates a wealth of new content in a variety of media, including photographs of the writers and their families, images of the original diaries, artwork made by the writers, historical documents, glossary terms, maps, survivor testimony (some available for the first time), and video of the author teaching key passages. In addition, an in-depth, interdisciplinary curriculum in history, literature, and writing developed by the author and a team of teachers, working in cooperation with the educational organization Facing History and Ourselves, is now available to support use of the book in middle- and high-school classrooms.

  • Opera on Screen

    What happens to opera when it's presented on the screen? How does an opera change when it becomes a movie, a television presentation, or a video? This book is the first to explore opera and its treatment on the screen from a musicologist's perspective. Marcia Citron provides a fascinating history of the nearly 100-year-old genre, examines landmark works of opera on screen from a variety of viewpoints, and shows how different electronic media shape the conception of this art form.

    The book begins with a comprehensive survey of the origins and development of screen opera. Citron then focuses on such significant works as Franco Zeffirelli's Otello, Francesco Rosi's Bizet's Carmen, Joseph Losey's Don Giovanni, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's Tales of Hoffmann, Hans-Jurgen Syberberg's Parsifal, Peter Sellars's four opera productions for television, and the celebrated relay telecast of Otello from the Royal Opera House in London. The author draws on ideas from diverse fields, including media studies and gender studies, to examine issues ranging from the relationship between sound and image to the place of the viewer in relation to the spectacle. As she raises questions about divisions between high art and popular art and about the tensions between live and reproduced art forms, Citron reveals how screen treatments reinforce opera's vitality in a media-intensive age.

  • Chatter - Architecture Talks Back

    A bold, theoretical look at an emerging generation of architects, this volume is devoted to five contemporary practices--Bureau Spectacular, Erin Besler, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, Formlessfinder, and John Szot Studio--and the diverse methods and approaches that drive their work. Chatter, whose title refers to the disjointed bits of conversation typified by texting and Twitter, examines how contemporary modes of communication have influenced the construction of ideas in the development, production, and presentation of architecture.

    Karen Kice surveys the evolution of architecture and illuminates how these architects have developed their work in conversation with historical theories and projects. Using a range of representational methods and formats to explore ideas--from hand- and robot-made drawings, to graphic novels, to digital simulations--these practitioners embrace contemporary technologies while they engage with history. Kice's essay, accompanied by portfolios of works from each studio, deftly elucidates how these practitioners talk back to the past while conceiving and communicating their unique designs.

  • The Jewelry and Metalwork of Marie Zimmermann

    A pioneering study of one of the most remarkable makers of jewelry and metalwork in early-20th-century America

    A true eclectic in her personal life, her professional pursuits, and her creative expression, Marie Zimmermann has proven an elusive character for historians. But her skill as a designer and prodigious output of extraordinary jewelry and metalwork in the early 20th century have routinely caught people by surprise. At its best, Zimmermann's work is beguiling and exhilarating, exploring a wide range of innovative approaches to pattern, material, and surface. The diversity of her oeuvre, including work in gold, silver, bronze, copper, and iron, is as astonishing as the boldness of the life she led.

    This book gathers for the first time the story of Zimmermann's life and work and puts a spotlight on one of the most singular makers of metalwork active in early-20th-century America. Essays by leading scholars in the decorative arts offer extensive new research on Zimmermann and her work, while more than 500 gorgeous full-color images show the breadth and novelty of her design practice.

  • The Gift Tradition in Islamic Art

    The offering of gifts is a practice nearly as ancient and widespread as human culture itself. At courts throughout the Islamic world, the exchange of lavish gifts and endowments intimately linked art with diplomacy and royal ambitions, religion, and personal relationships.

    This beautifully illustrated book explores the complex interplay between artistic production and gift-based patronage by discussing works of great aesthetic refinement that were either commissioned or repurposed as gifts. By tracing the unique histories of certain artworks, the author reveals how the exchange of luxury objects was central to the circulation, emulation, and assimilation of artistic forms both within and beyond the Islamic world. The catalogue features seventy illustrations of artworks from the 8th to the 20th century. These include some of the most beautiful and least-known objects from the Islamic world, such as jewelry, armor and weaponry, enormous and ornate carpets, and illustrated copies of the Qur'an.

  • Modernism and Landscape Architecture, 1890-1940

    In the period from 1890 to 1940, landscape architects organized as a profession distinct from art and architecture, bringing to the fore a variety of theories and aspirations--to influence urban growth, reinforce national identity, and shape land conservation and land-use planning, among other goals--in response to challenges posed by rapid change. The twelve essays included in this exceptional volume grapple with the definition and significance of modernism in landscape design during this transformative era.

    An international roster of leading landscape historians discuss established and less recognized designers, such as Maria Teresa Parpagliolo, who sought to define the modern Italian garden, or Benito Javier Carrasco, who made recreational green space a public amenity in Buenos Aires. Examining gardens and landscapes of all scales and purposes, from private villa gardens to civic spaces, these essays contribute original insight and rigorous research to the growing field of landscape studies.

  • Unearthed - Recent Archaeological Discoveries from Northern China

    In recent decades archaeological discoveries across northern China have brought to light unexpected and significant works of extraordinary beauty. These artifacts express the dynamic changes taking place in this region from the fifth to eleventh century, helping to redefine our understanding of ancient Chinese cultures.

    Unearthed showcases recently excavated artifacts from Shanxi and Gansu provinces, many of which have never been exhibited outside China. These objects range from fantastical tomb guardian-beasts, to luxury goods reflecting the lucrative "Silk Road" trade, to objects designed for religious or ritual purposes, to a magnificent stone sarcophagus in the shape of a traditional Chinese house. Detailed essays discuss tradition and innovation in Chinese art; China's interactions with the outside world through trade and invasion; artistic techniques and styles; and cultural traditions. The acquisition of the artifacts is contextualized within the major developments in Chinese archaeology over the past hundred years, with particular attention to the intense periods after 1950 and its status today.

  • New Worlds - A Religious History of Latin America

    A brilliant capstone work that analyzes the entire history of Latin America's reception of Christianity

    This extraordinary book encompasses the time period from the first Christian evangelists' arrival in Latin America to the dictators of the late twentieth century. With unsurpassed knowledge of Latin American history, John Lynch sets out to explore the reception of Christianity by native peoples and how it influenced their social and religious lives as the centuries passed. As attentive to modern times as to the colonial period, Lynch also explores the extent to which Indian religion and ancestral ways survived within the new Christian culture.

    The book follows the development of religious culture over time by focusing on peak periods of change: the response of religion to the Enlightenment, the emergence of the Church from the wars of independence, the Romanization of Latin American religion as the papacy overtook the Spanish crown in effective control of the Church, the growing challenge of liberalism and the secular state, and in the twentieth century, military dictators' assaults on human rights. Throughout the narrative, Lynch develops a number of special themes and topics. Among these are the Spanish struggle for justice for Indians, the Church's position on slavery, the concept of popular religion as distinct from official religion, and the development of liberation theology.

  • Like a Bomb Going Off - Leonid Yakobson and Ballet as Resistance in Soviet Russia

    The powerfully moving story of the Russian Jewish choreographer who used dance to challenge despotism

    Everyone has heard of George Balanchine, but few outside Russia know of Leonid Yakobson, Balanchine's contemporary and arguably his equal, who remained in Lenin's Russia and survived censorship during the darkest days of Stalin. Like Shostakovich, Yakobson suffered for his art and yet managed to create a singular body of revolutionary work that spoke to the Soviet condition. His ballets were considered so explosive that their impact was described as "like a bomb going off."

    Challenged rather than intimidated by the restrictions imposed by Soviet censors on his ballets, Yakobson offered dancers and audiences an experience quite different from the prevailing Soviet aesthetic. He was unwilling to bow completely to the state's limitations on his artistic opportunities, so despite his fraught relations with his political overseers, his ballets retained early-twentieth-century movement innovations such as turned-in and parallel-foot positions, oddly angled lifts, and eroticized content, all of which were anathema to prevailing Soviet ballet orthodoxy. For Yakobson, ballet was a form of political discourse, and he was particularly alive to the suppressed identity of Soviet Jews and officially sanctioned anti-Semitism. He used dance to celebrate reinvention and self-authorship--the freedom of the individual voice as subject and medium. His ballets challenged the role of the dancing body during some of the most repressive decades of totalitarian rule.

    Yakobson's work unfolded in a totalitarian state, and there was little official effort to preserve his choreographic archive or export knowledge of him to the West--gaps that dance historian Janice Ross seeks to redress in this book. Based on untapped archival collections of photographs, films, and writings about Yakobson's work in Moscow and St. Petersburg for the Bolshoi and Kirov ballets, as well as interviews with former dancers, family, and audience members, this illuminating and beautifully written study brings to life a hidden history of artistic resistance in the Soviet Union through the story of a brave artist who struggled his entire life against political repression yet continued to offer a vista of hope.

  • After Constructivism

    When Constructivism emerged shortly after the Russian Revolution, its central principles concerned structure and efficiency in the work of art and the nature and properties of materials. In a series of eight essays, Brandon Taylor examines the origins of these principles and their extraordinary consequences for the rest of modern art. Even before Constructivism, structure was a vital ingredient in Cubist art. After it, ideas about faktura or the "madeness" of an art object--and about its rational organization--became stock-in-trade for De Stijl in Holland and Art Concret in France and bore decisively on other currents such as Surrealism and abstract art. After 1945, artistic movements including Systems, Kinetic and Minimal Art were all touched by the long reach of Constructivist ideals. Recent art has proved no exception. Taylor shows that casual attitudes to materials, even the collapse of Constructivist ideals, have helped form the artistic tenor of our times.

  • The Hanging of Thomas Jeremiah

    The tragic untold story of how a nation struggling for its freedom denied it to one of its own.

    In 1775, Thomas Jeremiah was one of fewer than five hundred "Free Negros" in South Carolina and, with an estimated worth of GBP1,000 (about $200,000 in today's dollars), possibly the richest person of African descent in British North America. A slaveowner himself, Jeremiah was falsely accused by whites--who resented his success as a Charleston harbor pilot--of sowing insurrection among slaves at the behest of the British.

    Chief among the accusers was Henry Laurens, Charleston's leading patriot, a slaveowner and former slave trader, who would later become the president of the Continental Congress. On the other side was Lord William Campbell, royal governor of the colony, who passionately believed that the accusation was unjust and tried to save Jeremiah's life but failed. Though a free man, Jeremiah was tried in a slave court and sentenced to death. In August 1775, he was hanged and his body burned.

    J. William Harris tells Jeremiah's story in full for the first time, illuminating the contradiction between a nation that would be born in a struggle for freedom and yet deny it--often violently--to others.

  • Wagner in Performance

    Despite the voluminous literature on Wagner's operas, little has been published that does justice to all the elements of their performance. This book, addressed to both specialists and the opera-going public, brings together a team of authorities from around the world to examine the performance history and reception of Wagner's works in Europe and America.

    Essays on conducting, singing, production, and stage design of Wagner's works explore the revolutionary nature of the composer's demands on his interpreters. The book raises profound aesthetic questions about the realization of opera on the stage: the authority of the composer vis-a-vis the director and the audience; the sanctity of the text, score, and stage directions; and the role of art itself in society. The volume also considers the explosion in popularity of Wagner's music dramas and their ability to assume new meanings--on stage and in recordings--for successive generations. It looks at the often vociferous debate over vocal and conducting styles, at the origins of Bayreuth, and at the impact of Wagner on the musical life of New York and Vienna. The book is certain to raise the level of discussion about opera production generally and to enhance our enjoyment of Wagner's works in the opera house.

  • Stumbling Giant - The Threats to China′s Future

    Can anything prevent China surpassing the United States and becoming the world's superpower?

    While dozens of recent books and articles have predicted the near-certainty of China's rise to global supremacy, this book boldly counters such widely-held assumptions. Timothy Beardson brings to light the daunting array of challenges that today confront China, as well as the inadequacy of the policy responses. Threats to China come on many fronts, Beardson shows, and by their number and sheer weight these problems will thwart any ambition to become the world's "Number One power." Drawing on extensive research and experience living and working in Asia over the last 35 years, the author spells out China's situation: an inexorable demographic future of a shrinking labor force, relentless aging, extreme gender disparity, and even a falling population. Also, the nation faces social instability, a devastated environment, a predominantly low-tech economy with inadequate innovation, the absence of an effective welfare safety net, an ossified governance structure, and radical Islam lurking at the borders. Beardson's nuanced, first-hand look at China acknowledges its historic achievements while tempering predictions of its imminent hegemony with a no-nonsense dose of reality.

  • Sherrie Levine - Mayhem

    Although the American photographer and conceptual artist Sherrie Levine (b. 1947) has been the subject of much critical discourse for the past thirty years, she has not been the subject of a comprehensive survey, until now. This handsome volume, created in close collaboration with the artist, contains 150 colour images that cover the full range of Levine's practice, from classic photographic works and sculptures to lesser-known works on paper, paintings, and three-dimensional objects. A selection of previously unpublished writings by the artist herself and several essays by distinguished art historians augment the artworks. While much of Levine's art has a historical basis - drawing on existing imagery from both high and low culture - her early and continued engagement with digital technology places her firmly within a contemporary context, in which the borrowing, reframing, and reproduction of imagery have become second nature. This book acknowledges the central role Levine has played in the history of appropriation, and also draws attention to her practice of using repetition, multiple images and the pairing of objects, thereby highlighting conceptual threads that run through her work. Above all, however, the publication focuses on the materiality of Levine's art, emphasizing its powerfully seductive nature.

  • Bernini′s Beloved - A Portrait of Costanza Piccolomini

    With lips slightly parted and eyes fixed on a point in the distance, a breathtaking marble portrait of Costanza Piccolomini appears alive. Carved by Gianlorenzo Bernini in 1636-37 for his own pleasure, the portrait of Costanza is one of his most captivating works, but until now little has been known about its subject.

    For centuries Costanza was identified only as Bernini's mistress, who later incited his rage by betraying him for his brother. Author Sarah McPhee corrects and expands this story in her remarkable biography of a sculpture and its subject. Bernini's Beloved sets the bust and Costanza's own life--her childhood and noble name, her marriage, affair, fall from grace, and recovery--against the backdrop of Baroque Rome. Beautifully illustrated and written, this fascinating story expands our understanding of the woman whose intelligence and passion served as inspiration for Bernini's celebrated sculpture, and who courageously forged a life for herself in the decades following its creation.

  • Arts & Crafts Stained Glass

    An insightful corrective demonstrating the Arts and Crafts Movement's indelible impact on British and American stained glass

    Beautifully illustrated and based on more than three decades of research, Arts & Crafts Stained Glass is the first study of how the late-19th-century Arts and Crafts Movement transformed the aesthetics and production of stained glass in Britain and America. A progressive school of artists, committed to direct involvement both in making and designing windows, emerged in the 1880s and 1890s, reinventing stained glass as a modern, expressive art form. Using innovative materials and techniques, they rejected formulaic Gothic Revivalism while seeking authentic, creative inspiration in medieval traditions. This new approach was pioneered by Christopher Whall (1849-1924), whose charismatic teaching educated a generation of talented pupils--both men and women--who produced intensely colorful and inventive stained glass, using dramatic, lyrical, and often powerfully moving design and symbolism. Peter Cormack demonstrates how women made critical contributions to the renewal of stained glass as artists and entrepreneurs, gaining meaningful equality with their male colleagues, more fully than in any other applied art. Cormack restores stained glass to its proper status as an important field of Arts and Crafts activity, with a prominent role in the movement's polemical campaigning, its public exhibitions, and its educational program.

  • Russia Abroad - Prague and the Russian Diaspora 1918-1938

    In the wake of the Russian Revolution and the ensuing civil war, approximately 1.5 million Russians fled their country. Many settled in Prague, where they were welcomed and supported by the newly formed Czechoslovak Republic. This book presents the first full account of Prague's Russian emigre community from 1918 to 1939, when the Nazi invasion scattered the inhabitants yet again. Russia Abroad examines the life of this vibrant community, its activity, achievement, and importance.

    Catherine Andreyev and Ivan Savicky explore the reasons that Czechoslovakia embraced the Russian immigrants, the evolution of the Russian community, and why the original idea of supporting Russian emigres and creating an academic center of progressive Russians had to be modified in light of national and international politics. The story they tell not only illuminates aspects of Russian life and culture of the period but also offers insights into later diasporas in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

  • Balthus: Cats and Girls

    An insightful new look at Balthus's ongoing fascination with cats and girls, including his controversial paintings of young adolescents

    Balthus's lifelong curiosity with the ambiguities and dark side of childhood resulted in his best-known and most iconic works. In these pictures, Balthus (1908-2001) mingles intuition into his young sitters' psyches with overt erotic desire and forbidding austerity, making them among the most powerful depictions of childhood and adolescence ever committed to canvas. Often included in these scenes are enigmatic cats, possible stand-ins for the artist himself.

    Balthus: Cats and Girls is the first book devoted to this subject, focusing on the early decades of the artist's career from the mid-1930s to the 1950s. Drawing on extensive knowledge of the artist's life and work, as well as on interviews with Balthus and the models themselves, Sabine Rewald explores the origins and permutations of Balthus's obsessions with adolescents and felines. She addresses the crucial influence of such key figures as poet Rainer Maria Rilke, his mother's lover, who acted as Balthus's surrogate father, but also includes the previously unknown voices of the girl models: their recollections and comments provide a unique perspective on some of the best known and most controversial paintings of the 20th century.


  • Antonello Da Messina: Sicily's Renaissance Master

    Praised in fifteenth-century humanist circles for his uncanny ability to create figures "so well that they seemed alive and missing only a soul," the great quattrocento master Antonello da Messina was born Antonello di Giovanni d'Antonio about 1430 in Messina, a small city on the periphery of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. This catalogue accompanies a small, focused exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art centered around the loan by a trio of Sicilian museums of three masterpieces by Antonello, which were seen for the first time in the United States. The recently rediscovered double-sided painting from Messina of the "Madonna and Child, with a Praying Franciscan Donor," perhaps the artist's earliest extant work, with a poignant image of "Christ Crowned with Thorns" on the reverse, is joined by the "Portrait of a Man" from Cefalu, a psychological tour de force, and by the centerpiece of the group--the compelling and mysterious "Virgin Annunciate" from Palermo, whose haunting beauty and serenity have been compared to that of Leonardo's "Mona Lisa."

    A handful of other works by Antonello--including the Metropolitan Museum's "Christ Crowned with Thorns"; a drawing attributed to the artist in the Metropolitan's Robert Lehman Collection; and a panel of the "Ecce Homo" with a scene of "Saint Jerome in the Desert" on the reverse side, on loan from a private collection--as well as four related works by Antonello's contemporaries from the Museum's own collection, complete the exhibition. The drawing and each of the paintings are reproduced in full color, some with fascinating details. In addition, several of the master's key iconic paintings are shown in comparative illustrations.

    Although details about Antonello's beginnings are scarce, clouded by legend and sometimes dubious information in the early sources, his artistic formation appears to have taken place in Naples, during the reign of Alfonso of Aragon, in a cultural climate open to French, Provencal, Spanish, and Netherlandish influences. Already an independent master by 1457, he received numerous local commissions and was the head of a thriving workshop. A possible first trip to Rome about 1460 may have afforded Antonello the opportunity to experience the work of Fra Angelico and Piero della Francesca firsthand. However, the defining moment in his artistic development was to come later, in 1474-75, when Antonello made his first documented journey to Venice, a landmark occasion; it was there that he was commissioned to paint the principal altarpiece, his masterpiece, for the church of San Cassiano. This innovative work would leave a lasting imprint on the art of Giovanni Bellini and other Venetian masters, while the portraits Antonello painted in that city represent a new stage in the evolution of the genre in Italy. No greater artists would emerge from Southern Italy in the fifteenth century.

    The introductory essay by Keith Christiansen illuminates the high points of Antonello's achievements in the context of his time and his culture; the essay by Gioacchino Barbera offers a comprehensive study of Antonello's life, family background, artistic training, travels, expertise as a portraitist, preoccupation with the theme of the "Ecce Homo," late career, and artistic legacy. Entries on the exhibited works, by Gioacchino Barbera and Andrea Bayer, precede a capsule biography of the artist, information about the three lending museums in Sicily, a checklist of the supplementary exhibited works, and a selected bibliography. [This book was originally published in 2005 and has gone out of print. This edition is a print-on-demand version of the original book.]

  • Behind Closed Doors - At Home in Georgian England

    In this brilliant new work, Amanda Vickery unlocks the homes of Georgian England to examine the lives of the people who lived there. Writing with her customary wit and verve, she introduces us to men and women from all walks of life: gentlewoman Anne Dormer in her stately Oxfordshire mansion, bachelor clerk and future novelist Anthony Trollope in his dreary London lodgings, genteel spinsters keeping up appearances in two rooms with yellow wallpaper, servants with only a locking box to call their own.

    Vickery makes ingenious use of upholsterer's ledgers, burglary trials, and other unusual sources to reveal the roles of house and home in economic survival, social success, and political representation during the long eighteenth century. Through the spread of formal visiting, the proliferation of affordable ornamental furnishings, the commercial celebration of feminine artistry at home, and the currency of the language of taste, even modest homes turned into arenas of social campaign and exhibition.

  • Void: The Strange Physics of Nothing

    The rising star author of The Physics of Wall Street explores why "nothing" may hold the key to the next era of theoretical physics

    James Owen Weatherall's previous book, The Physics of Wall Street, was a New York Times best-seller and named one of Physics Today's five most intriguing books of 2013. In his newest volume, he takes on a fundamental concept of modern physics: nothing. The physics of stuff--protons, neutrons, electrons, and even quarks and gluons--is at least somewhat familiar to most of us. But what about the physics of nothing? Isaac Newton thought of empty space as nothingness extended in all directions, a kind of theater in which physics could unfold. But both quantum theory and relativity tell us that Newton's picture can't be right. Nothing, it turns out, is an awful lot like something, with a structure and properties every bit as complex and mysterious as matter. In his signature lively prose, Weatherall explores the very nature of empty space--and solidifies his reputation as a science writer to watch.

  • Warm Flesh, Cold Marble - Canova, Thorvaldsen and their Critics

    This brilliant book focuses on the aesthetic concerns of the two most important sculptors of the early 19th century, the great Italian sculptor Antonio Canova (1757-1822) and his illustrious Danish rival Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844). Rather than comparing their artistic output, the distinguished art historian David Bindman addresses the possible impact of Kantian aesthetics on their work. Both artists had elevated reputations, and their sculptures attracted interest from philosophically minded critics. Despite the sculptors' own apparent disdain for theory, Bindman argues that they were in dialogue with and greatly influenced by philosophical and critical debates, and made many decisions in creating their sculptures specifically in response to those debates. Warm Flesh, Cold Marble considers such intriguing topics as the aesthetic autonomy of works of art, the gender of the subject, the efficacy of marble as an imitative medium, the question of color and texture in relation to ideas and practices of antiquity, and the relationship between the whiteness of marble and ideas of race.

  • Venice and Drawing 1500-1800: Theory, Practice and Collecting

    An impressive overview of drawing in Venice, from the time of Titian and Tintoretto to that of Canaletto and Tiepolo


    From the time of Titian and Tintoretto to that of Canaletto and Tiepolo, drawing was an important part of artistic practice and was highly valued in Venice. This exciting new study overturns traditional views on the significance of drawing in Venice, as an art and an act, from the Renaissance to the age of the Grand Tour. Gathering together the separate strands of theory, artistic practice, and collecting, Catherine Whistler highlights the interactions and tensions between a developing literary discourse and the practices of making and collecting graphic art. Her analysis challenges the conventional definition of Venetian art purely in terms of color, demonstrating that 16th-century Venetian artists and writers had a highly developed sense of the role and importance of disegno and drawing in art. The book's generous illustrations support these striking arguments, as well as conveying the great variety, interest, and beauty of the drawings themselves.

  • Lucian Freud Portraits

    "For me, the paint is the person."--Lucian Freud

    Portraits were central to the work of Lucian Freud (1922-2011). Working only from life, the artist claimed, "I could never put anything into a picture that wasn't actually there in front of me." This major retrospective catalogue surveys Freud's portraits across the seven decades of his career. Featuring the finest portraits from public and private collections around the world, the book explores the stylistic development and remarkable technical virtuosity of an artist regarded as one of the most innovative figurative painters the medium has known.

    Freud's chosen subjects were often his intimates--family members, friends, and artistic colleagues such as Frank Auerbach, Francis Bacon, Leigh Bowery, and David Hockney. Freud was private man who rarely gave interviews, and his thoughts on the complex relationship between artist and sitter and the challenges of painting nudes and self-portraits are published here for the first time, documented in a series of interviews with Michael Auping, conducted between May 2009 and January 2011. An illustrated chronology of the artist's life provides fascinating insights into Freud's background as a grandson of Sigmund Freud, and his unorthodox artistic education.

    An essential book for every personal art library, this lavishly illustrated volume celebrates the work and career of an artist who overturned traditional portraiture and offered a new approach to figurative art.

  • Vauxhall Gardens - A History

    From their early beginnings in the Restoration until the final closure in Queen Victoria's reign, Vauxhall Gardens developed from a rural tavern and place of assignation into a dream-world filled with visual arts and music, and finally into a commercial site of mass entertainment. By the 18th century, Vauxhall was crucial to the cultural and fashionable life of the country, patronized by all levels of society, from royal dukes to penurious servants.

    In the first book on the subject for over fifty years, Alan Borg and David E. Coke reveal the teeming life, the spectacular art and the ever-present music of Vauxhall in fascinating detail. Borg and Coke's historical exposition of the entire history of the gardens makes a major contribution to the study of London entertainments, art, music, sculpture, class and ideology. It reveals how Vauxhall linked high and popular culture in ways that look forward to the manner in which both art and entertainment have evolved in modern times.

  • Republic of Shade - New England and the American Elm

    The American elm, elegant and highly adaptable, was an essential feature of America's cultural landscape for more than a century, forming great verdant parasols above--and giving its name to--streets all across the nation. The elm became a defining element in the spatial design of America's villages, towns, and cities, first in New England, and--with the westward transit of Yankee culture--eventually throughout the United States. This fascinating and generously illustrated book traces the elm's transformation from a fast-growing weed into a regional and national icon, and shows how Elm Street satisfied America's quest for a pastoral urbanism imagined since the time of Jefferson.

  • Cloisonne - Chinese Enamels from the Ming and Qing Dynasties

    The technique of applying brilliant enamel ornament to metalwork, known as cloisonne, reached its peak in China from the fourteenth century on. This sumptuously illustrated survey, which accompanies an exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center, situates these remarkable pieces in their context with a survey of the historical, political and sociological milieu in China during the period. Research recently undertaken in China and published here for the first time has resulted in the redating of a number of objects with significant implications for the overview of Chinese cloisonne production. Shapes, functions, pattern, and symbolism in cloisonne objects are all examined and explored. And the final section of the book reviews the impact of developments in China on later production in Europe, as well as the acquisition of cloisonne pieces by the major American museums and private collectors at the beginning of the twentieth century.

  • Interaction of Color - 50 Anniversary Edition

    The 50th anniversary edition of a classic text, featuring an expanded selection of color studies

    Josef Albers's Interaction of Color is a masterwork in art education. Conceived as a handbook and teaching aid for artists, instructors, and students, this influential book presents Albers's singular explanation of complex color theory principles.

    Originally published by Yale University Press in 1963 as a limited silkscreen edition with 150 color plates, Interaction of Color first appeared in paperback in 1971, featuring ten color studies chosen by Albers, and has remained in print ever since. With over a quarter of a million copies sold in its various editions since 1963, Interaction of Color remains an essential resource on color, as pioneering today as when Albers first created it.

    Fifty years after Interaction's initial publication, this new edition presents a significantly expanded selection of close to sixty color studies alongside Albers's original text, demonstrating such principles as color relativity, intensity, and temperature; vibrating and vanishing boundaries; and the illusion of transparency and reversed grounds. A celebration of the longevity and unique authority of Albers's contribution, this landmark edition will find new audiences in studios and classrooms around the world.

  • In God′s Shadow - A Political Theorist Reads the Hebrew Bible

    One of our most distinguished political theorists deliberates on the politics of the Bible and arrives at unexpected conclusions

    In this eagerly awaited book, political theorist Michael Walzer reports his findings after decades of thinking about the politics of the Hebrew Bible. Attentive to nuance while engagingly straightforward, Walzer examines the laws, the histories, the prophecies, and the wisdom of the ancient biblical writers and discusses their views on such central political questions as justice, hierarchy, war, the authority of kings and priests, and the experience of exile.

    Because there are many biblical writers with differing views, pluralism is a central feature of biblical politics. Yet pluralism, Walzer observes, is never explicitly defended in the Bible; indeed, it couldn't be defended since God's word had to be as singular as God himself. Yet different political regimes are described in the biblical texts, and there are conflicting political arguments--and also a recurrent anti-political argument: if you have faith in God, you have no need for strong institutions, prudent leaders, or reformist policies. At the same time, however, in the books of law and prophecy, the people of Israel are called upon to overcome oppression and "let justice well up like water, righteousness like an unfailing stream."

  • "Great and Mighty things" - Outsider Art from the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Collection

    The contemporary art world has been challenged and invigorated by outsider art--works by self-taught practitioners who, by definition, have little to do with mainstream art production, but are nonetheless actively engaged with the visual culture of their time and place.

    This is the first book to explore the collection of Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz, one of the finest private collections of American outsider art. Twenty-seven artists are included in the selection published here, among them Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, William Edmondson, Howard Finster, Sister Gertrude Morgan, Martin Ramirez, and Bill Traylor. The book presents short biographies of the artists and essays by major scholars that examine the work from both theoretical and historical perspectives, with a particular focus on the relationship of contemporary art to outsider art and how the latter has been critically appropriated into postmodern discourse. Renowned artist Francesco Clemente's fascinating essay places these so-called outsiders in the mystical tradition of Jacob Boehme, Emanuel Swedenborg, and William Blake.

  • Richard Artschwager!

    For nearly sixty years, Richard Artschwager (b. 1923) has undertaken an unrelenting investigation of art's ability to mediate contemporary experience and perception. Although his work, which includes sculpture, painting, prints, and drawing, is often characterized as having elements of Pop Art, Minimalism, and Conceptual Art, his practice defies easy categorization and his oeuvre is not entirely understood. In Richard Artschwager! the breadth of the artist's idealistic, diverse work, and unconventional materials, such as Formica, rubberized hair, and Celotex, is fully illustrated and explored for the first time.

    The four essays in this volume illuminate previously unaddressed aspects of Artschwager's work, including his response to life in the age of mechanical reproduction, the relationship of his work to mainstream art, and his recent work's connection with Post-Impressionism. These texts, along with new photographs, previously unpublished archival images, and details of his materials, offer a compelling new look at one of the most singular artists of the 20th century and why he remains a highly influential figure today.

  • Kent - North East and East - Buildings of England

    The exceptionally rich architecture of eastern Kent is covered by this fully revised, updated, and expanded edition of John Newman's classic survey, first published in 1969. This city of Canterbury is the county's greatest treasure, and its glorious cathedral is the first mature example of Gothic architecture in England. The influence of Canterbury appears also in the remains of St Augustine's 17th-century mission churches, and in sophisticated Norman carved work at churches such as Barfrestone. Kent is also a maritime county, and its coastal towns are excitingly diverse: the royal stronghold of Dover with its mighty medieval castle; the medieval port of Sandwich; and resorts large and small, from genteel Folkestone to lively Margate, with its bold new art gallery.

  • Survey of London - Battersea - Volume 50 - Houses and Housing

    The south London parish of Battersea has roots as a working village, growing produce for London markets, and as a high-class suburb, with merchants' villas on the elevated ground around Clapham and Wadsworth Commons. Battersea enjoyed spectacular growth during Queen Victoria's reign, and railroads brought industry and a robust building boom, transforming the parish into another of London's dense, smoky neighborhoods, though not without its unique and distinguishing features. Among these are Battersea Park, which was created by the Crown in the 1850s; the monumental Battersea Power Station, completed in 1939; and Clapham Junction railway station, which is, by measure of passenger interchanges, the busiest station in the United Kingdom.

    The two latest volumes of the Survey of London, 49 and 50, trace Battersea's development from medieval times to the present day. Offering detailed analysis of its streets and buildings both thematically and topographically, and including copious original in-depth research and investigation, the books are a trove of architectural history and British history. Profusely illustrated with new and archival images, architectural drawings and maps, these volumes are welcome additions to the acclaimed Survey of London series.

  • Grand Design - Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Renaissance Tapestry

    Renowned throughout Renaissance Europe, Pieter Coecke van Aelst (1502-1550) produced works for the wealthiest and most important patrons of the time, including Emperor Charles V, Francis I of France, Henry VIII of England, the Habsburgs, and Cosimo de Medici. While he is best known for his magnificent tapestries, he was also a consummate artist in other media, and the output from his workshop included painted altarpieces, as well as designs and cartoons for stained glass. This lavish publication, the first comprehensive volume devoted to this Renaissance master since 1966, introduces Pieter Coecke van Aelst to a contemporary audience and places him among the great artists of the 16th century. New photographs, including fine details, reunite twenty of the splendid Renaissance tapestries made to his designs with some of his finest surviving drawings and panel paintings, while texts by thirteen prominent scholars explore Coecke's art and world. Both a feast for the eyes and an important reappraisal of a great Renaissance master, this important study will stand as the comprehensive volume on a major artist of the Northern Renaissance.

  • Old Javanese Gold - The Hunter Thompson Collection at the Yale University Art Gallery

    While ancient Javanese bronze and ironwork have long elicited interest, there is a lesser-known yet equally fascinating aspect of the Indonesian island's history: gold artifacts, including jewelry, clothing accessories, statues, coins, and containers. Not only do these objects display exceptional craftsmanship, they also provide a significant source of information on Javanese society, culture, religion, economy, technology, and art from the 1st century BCE to 1500.

    This revised and expanded edition of the 1990 publication Old Javanese Gold celebrates Valerie and Hunter Thompson's 2007 gift of Javanese gold objects to the Yale University Art Gallery and the subsequent founding of the Department of Indo-Pacific Art. Along with entirely new photography and a fresh design, the book's essays have been updated to incorporate recent discoveries--including the Wonoboyo hoard, one of the most important gold hoards ever excavated in Southeast Asia.

  • The Art of American Still Life - Audobon to Warhol

    An engaging survey of American still-life painting that reinterprets beloved works and introduces lesser-known ones, providing a compelling new synthesis of the subject

    The Art of American Still Life reconsiders the development and cultural significance of still-life painting in America, exploring renowned treasures alongside recently discovered works--some previously unpublished--in unexpected ways.

    Taking an innovative approach to the genre, this captivating survey newly divides American still life into four discrete eras, each characterized by a predominant form of vision: describing, indulging, discerning, and animating. Works are grouped in "conversations" and explored in accompanying texts to reveal wider cultural meaning. Introductory essays investigate the many interactions between still life and American culture, examining the close connections between still-life painting and other visual discourses, including natural history, illustration, and commercial photography; the roles objects have played in American literature and art; the Philadelphia region's defining and lasting impact on the genre; and the reception of still life in American art and art history.

    The first major study of American still life in a generation, The Art of American Still Life is destined to become a standard reference on the subject.

  • Future Humans: Inside the Science of Our Continuing Evolution

    Are humans still subject to the forces of evolution? An evolutionary biologist provides surprising insights into the future of Homo sapiens

    In this intriguing book, evolutionary biologist Scott Solomon draws on the explosion of discoveries in recent years to examine the future evolution of our species. Combining knowledge of our past with current trends, Solomon offers convincing evidence that evolutionary forces still affect us today. But how will modernization--including longer lifespans, changing diets, global travel, and widespread use of medicine and contraceptives--affect our evolutionary future?

    Solomon presents an entertaining and accessible review of the latest research on human evolution in modern times, drawing on fields from genomics to medicine and the study of our microbiome. Surprising insights, on topics ranging from the rise of online dating and Cesarean sections to the spread of diseases such as HIV and Ebola, suggest that we are entering a new phase in human evolutionary history--one that makes the future less predictable and more interesting than ever before.

  • Ever Yours - The Essential Letters

    "There is scarcely one letter by Van Gogh which I, who am certainly no expert, do not find fascinating." --W. H. Auden

    In addition to his many remarkable paintings and drawings, Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) left behind a fascinating and voluminous body of correspondence. This highly accessible book includes a broad selection of 265 letters, from a total of 820 in existence, that focus on Van Gogh's relentless quest to find his destiny, a search that led him to become an artist; the close bond with his brother Theo; his fraught relationship with his father; his innate yearning for recognition; and his great love of art and literature. The correspondence not only offers detailed insights into Van Gogh's complex inner life, but also re-creates the world in which he lived and the artistic avant-garde that was taking hold in Paris.

    The letters are accompanied by a general introduction, historic family photographs, and reproductions of 87 actual pages of letters that contain sketches by Van Gogh. Selected from the critically acclaimed 6-volume set of letters published by the Van Gogh Museum in 2009, Ever Yours is the essential book on Van Gogh's letters, which every art and literature lover needs to own.

  • Gustav Mahler

    A bestseller when first published in Germany in 2003, Jens Malte Fischer's 'Gustav Mahler' has been lauded by scholars as a landmark work. He draws on important primary resources - some unavailable to previous biographers - and sets in narrative context the extensive correspondence between Mahler and his wife, Alma; Alma Mahler's diaries; and the memoirs of Natalie Bauer-Lechner, a viola player and close friend of Mahler, whose private journals provide insight into the composer's personal and professional lives and his creative process. Fischer explores Mahler's early life, his relationship to literature, his achievements as a conductor in Vienna and New York, his unhappy marriage, and his work with the Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic in his later years. He also illustrates why Mahler is a prime example of artistic idealism worn down by Austrian anti-Semitism and American commercialism. 'Gustav Mahler' is the best-sourced and most balanced biography available about the composer, a nuanced and intriguing portrait of his dramatic life set against the backdrop of early 20th century America and fin de siecle Europe.

  • Caravaggio and his Circle in Rome - A Barbaric and Brutal Manner

    The Italian artist Caravaggio (1571-1610) had a profound impact on a wide range of baroque painters of Italian, French, Dutch, Flemish, and Spanish origin who resided in Rome either during his lifetime or immediately afterward. This captivating book illustrates the notion of 'Caravaggism', showcasing 65 works by Peter Paul Rubens and other important artists of the period who drew inspiration from Caravaggio; these pieces are the focus of a North American exhibition. Also depicted are Caravaggio canvases that fully exhibit his distinctive style, along with ones that had a particularly discernible impact on other practitioners. Caravaggio's influence was greatest in Rome, where his works were seen by the largest and most international group of artists, and was at its peak in the early decades of the 17th century both before and after his untimely death at the age of 39. Not since Michelangelo or Raphael has one European artist affected so many of his contemporaries and over such broad geographic territory. Essays by an array of major Caravaggio scholars illuminate the underlying principles of the exhibition, reveal how Caravaggio altered the presentation and interpretation of many traditional subjects and inspired unusual new ones, and explore the artist's legacy and how he irrevocably changed the course of painting.

  • Carrie Mae Weems - Three Decades of Photography and Video

    The work of contemporary artist Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953) hits hard with a powerful mix of lived life and social commentary. Since the late 1970s, her photographs, films, and installations have become known for presenting realistic and authentic images of African Americans while confronting themes of race, gender, and class. This book, the first major survey of Weems's career, traces the artist's commitment to addressing issues of social justice through her artwork. Her early photographs, which focused on African American women and families, have since led to work that examines more general aspects of the African diaspora, from the legacy of slavery to the perpetuation of debilitating stereotypes. Increasingly, she has broadened her view to include global struggles for equality and justice. This beautifully illustrated book highlights over 200 of Weems's most important works. Accompanying essays by leading scholars explore Weems's interest in folklore, her focus on the spoken and written word, the performative aspect of her constructed tableaux, and her expressions of black beauty.

  • The Cloisters Cross: Its Art and Meaning

    The walrus-ivory Cloisters Cross, a masterpiece of English Romanesque art and a highlight of the Metropolitian Museum's Cloisters Collection, has long been the subject of speculation and mystery. This fascinating book explores the cross's creation and survival with substantial new insights into possible meanings and context. Includes photos and full-color illustrations.

  • Cottages and Villas - The Birth of the Garden Suburb

    The garden suburb has its origins in London, and, contrary to wide-spread belief, its earliest phase took place not at the beginning of the twentieth century, with the much discussed garden-city movement, but one century earlier, with the creation of the Eyre brothers' villa estate in the London suburb of St John's Wood. This fascinating book provides the first detailed, accurate and well-illustrated account of the Eyre Estate. Drawing on the resources of the newly catalogued Eyre archive, it offers an authoritative interpretation of the development and management of this pioneering estate from the eighteenth century onwards. As the first 'garden quarter' of Britain, the genesis and realisation of the Eyre Estate involved vision, entrepreneurship and formidable negotiation and organisational skills. The Eyre family, their circle of business partners, architects and builders created an environment within which villas and landmark buildings - secular and religious - offered a haven for artists, professionals and those who required discreet housing for less respectable purposes. Mireille Galinou describes how London acquired one of its most attractive and influential suburbs and how generations of the Eyre family shaped, fought over, lost and revitalised its inheritance. Little did they know they were making world history with their winning formula, which set the green suburb agenda for the middle classes around the globe.

  • Poilu - The World War I Notebooks of Corporal Louis Barthas, Barrelmaker, 1914-1918

    The harrowing first-person account of a French foot soldier who survived four years in the trenches of the First World War

    Along with millions of other Frenchmen, Louis Barthas, a thirty-five-year-old barrelmaker from a small wine-growing town, was conscripted to fight the Germans in the opening days of World War I. Corporal Barthas spent the next four years in near-ceaseless combat, wherever the French army fought its fiercest battles: Artois, Flanders, Champagne, Verdun, the Somme, the Argonne. Barthas' riveting wartime narrative, first published in France in 1978, presents the vivid, immediate experiences of a frontline soldier.

    This excellent new translation brings Barthas' wartime writings to English-language readers for the first time. His notebooks and letters represent the quintessential memoir of a "poilu," or "hairy one," as the untidy, unshaven French infantryman of the fighting trenches was familiarly known. Upon Barthas' return home in 1919, he painstakingly transcribed his day-to-day writings into nineteen notebooks, preserving not only his own story but also the larger story of the unnumbered soldiers who never returned. Recounting bloody battles and endless exhaustion, the deaths of comrades, the infuriating incompetence and tyranny of his own officers, Barthas also describes spontaneous acts of camaraderie between French poilus and their German foes in trenches just a few paces apart. An eloquent witness and keen observer, Barthas takes his readers directly into the heart of the Great War.

  • Heroes, Martyrs, and Political Messiahs in Revolutionary Cuba, 1946-1958

    A leading scholar sheds light on the experiences of ordinary Cubans in the unseating of the dictator Fulgencio Batista

    In this important and timely volume, one of today's foremost experts on Cuban history and politics fills a significant gap in the literature, illuminating how Cuba's electoral democracy underwent a tumultuous transformation into a military dictatorship. Lillian Guerra draws on her years of research in newly opened archives and on personal interviews to shed light on the men and women of Cuba who participated in mass mobilization and civic activism to establish social movements in their quest for social and racial justice and for more accountable leadership. Driven by a sense of duty toward la patria (the fatherland) and their dedication to heroism and martyrdom, these citizens built a powerful underground revolutionary culture that shaped and witnessed the overthrow of Batista in the late 1950s. Beautifully illustrated with archival photographs, this volume is a stunning addition to Latin American history and politics.

  • The O′Neill - The Transformation of Modern American Theater

    A lavishly illustrated celebration of the fifty-year history of the most influential theatrical organization in America, the O'Neill Theater Center

    "At the O'Neill, we were all engaged with full-hearted passion in sometimes the silliest of exercises, and all in service of finding that wiggly, elusive creature, a new play."--Meryl Streep

    "I would not be who or where I am today without the O'Neill."--Michael Douglas

    As the old ways of the commercial theater were dying and American playwriting was in crisis, the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center arose as a midwife to new plays and musicals, introducing some of the most exciting talents of our time (including August Wilson, Wendy Wasserstein, and Christopher Durang) and developing works that went on to win Pulitzer Prizes and Tony Awards. Along the way, it collaborated with then-unknown performers (like Meryl Streep, Michael Douglas, Courtney Vance, and Angela Bassett) and inspired Robert Redford in his creation of the Sundance Institute. This is the story of a theatrical laboratory, a place that transformed American theater, film, and television.

  • The Less You Know, the Better You Sleep: Russia's Road to Terror and Dictatorship Under Yeltsin and Putin

    Once you accept that the impossible is really possible, what happens in Russia makes perfect sense

    In December 2013, David Satter became the first American journalist to be expelled from Russia since the Cold War. The Moscow Times said it was not surprising he was expelled, "it was surprising it took so long." Satter is known in Russia for having written that the apartment bombings in 1999, which were blamed on Chechens and brought Putin to power, were actually carried out by the Russian FSB security police.

    In this book, Satter tells the story of the apartment bombings and how Boris Yeltsin presided over the criminalization of Russia, why Vladimir Putin was chosen as his successor, and how Putin has suppressed all opposition while retaining the appearance of a pluralist state. As the threat represented by Russia becomes increasingly clear, Satter's description of where Russia is and how it got there will be of vital interest to anyone concerned about the dangers facing the world today.

  • Painting in Latin America, 1550-1820, from Conquest to Independence

    Painting in Latin America, 1550-1820: From Conquest to Independence surveys the diverse styles, subjects, and iconography of painting in Latin America between the 16th and 19th centuries. While European art forms were widely disseminated, copied, and adapted throughout Latin America, colonial painting is not a derivative extension of Europe. The ongoing debate over what to call it--mestizo, hybrid, creole, indo-hispanic, tequitqui--testifies to a fundamental yet unresolved question of identity.

    Comparing and contrasting the Viceroyalties of New Spain, with its center in modern-day Mexico, and Peru, the authors explore the very different ways the two regions responded to the influence of the Europeans and their art. A wide range of art and artists are considered, some for the first time. Rich with new photography and primary research, this book delivers a wealth of new insight into the history of images and the history of art.

  • Dostoyevsky Reads Hegel in Siberia and Bursts into Tears

    An exemplary collection of work from one of the world's leading scholars of intellectual history

    Laszlo F. Foldenyi is a writer who is learned in reference, taste, and judgment, and entertaining in style. Taking a place in the long tradition of public intellectual and cultural criticism, his work resonates with that of Montaigne, Rilke, and Mann in its deep insight into aspects of culture that have been suppressed, yet still remain in the depth of our conscious.

    In this new collection of essays, Foldenyi considers the fallout from the end of religion and how the traditions of the Enlightenment have replaced neither the metaphysical completeness nor the comforting purpose of the previously held mythologies. Combining beautiful writing with empathy, imagination, fascination, and a fierce sense of justice, Foldenyi covers a wide range of topics that include a meditation on the metaphysical unity of a sculpture group and an analysis of fear as a window into our relationship with time.

  • Paul Strand - Master of Modern Photography

    A fresh account of the career of one of the most important photographers of the 20th century

    Through his amazing variety of innovative images, photographer Paul Strand (1890-1976) played a crucial role in establishing the medium's significance as a modern art form. Celebrating the Philadelphia Museum of Art's recent acquisition of the core collection of Strand's prints from the Paul Strand Archive, this stunning book comprehensively reassesses the artist's career in light of current scholarship and critical debates about his work. Featuring more than 250 plates, the catalogue includes many of Strand's iconic early photos such as Wall Street and Blind Woman alongside lesser-known master prints from all phases of his career.

    Discussing the artist's prolific career, from his emergence in Alfred Stieglitz's circle in New York in the early part of the century to his years spent working abroad in places such as Mexico, France, Italy, and Africa, Peter Barberie positions Strand as a remarkably independent modernist whose priorities shifted at several points and often ran counter to prevailing trends. Amanda N. Bock focuses on the years 1930-50, when Strand thoroughly explored the role of politics in modern art and relentlessly sought to identify the greater purposes of photography and filmmaking. The edited transcript from a roundtable discussion among key scholars touches upon many aspects of Strand's various projects from the 1930s to the 1960s. A detailed chronology brings to light new information about the life and work of an extraordinarily important and influential 20th-century photographer.

  • Alice Aycock Drawings - Some Stories are Worth Repeating

    Alice Aycock (b. 1946) emerged onto the New York art scene in the 1970s and is best known for her large-scale public sculptures that often combine an industrial appearance with references to weightlessness as well as to science and cosmology. Aycock also has embraced the practice of drawing throughout her enormously productive career. "Alice Aycock: Drawings" is the first exploration of her spectacular drawings, which include elements of mirage, fantasy, and science, and evoke both abstract thinking and bodily sensation. The works on paper featured in this handsome volume highlight the major themes that have governed her artistic practice: the role of architecture as a founding point of reference; the importance of mechanics and structure; and references to nature. As author Jonathan Fineberg demonstrates, Aycock is an artist who thinks on paper. Her works are often equal parts engineering plan and science fiction imagining. Visualizing such contradictions allows us to, in her words, transport ourselves 'farther into another place'.

  • Raising Henry - A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability and Discovery

    A mother's deeply moving account of raising a son with Down syndrome in a world crowded with contradictory attitudes toward disabilities

    Rachel Adams's life had always gone according to plan. She had an adoring husband, a beautiful two-year-old son, a sunny Manhattan apartment, and a position as a tenured professor at Columbia University. Everything changed with the birth of her second child, Henry. Just minutes after he was born, doctors told her that Henry had Down syndrome, and she knew that her life would never be the same. In this honest, self-critical, and surprisingly funny book, Adams chronicles the first three years of Henry's life and her own transformative experience of unexpectedly becoming the mother of a disabled child. A highly personal story of one family's encounter with disability, Raising Henry is also an insightful exploration of today's knotty terrain of social prejudice, disability policy, genetics, prenatal testing, medical training, and inclusive education. Adams untangles the contradictions of living in a society that is more enlightened and supportive of people with disabilities than ever before, yet is racing to perfect prenatal tests to prevent children like Henry from being born. Her book is gripping, beautifully written, and nearly impossible to put down. Once read, her family's story is impossible to forget.

  • Van Gogh - Up Close

    An entirely new perspective on the genius of Van Gogh, revealing for the first time the artist's approach to nature through his innovative use of the close-up view

    This sumptuously illustrated book offers a completely new way of looking at the art of Vincent van Gogh, by exploring the artist's approach to nature through his innovative use of the close-up view. Focusing on the last years of the artist's career--from 1886 until his death in July 1890--an international team of leading scholars in the field examines Van Gogh's radical approach to the close-up and sets it in the context of contemporary and historical references, such as his hitherto unrecognized use of photography and his fascination with the Old Masters and with Japanese art and culture.

    One hundred key paintings dating from his arrival in Paris in 1886 to the end of his career show how Van Gogh experimented with unusual visual angles and the decorative use of color, cropping, and the flattening of his compositions. In some paintings he zoomed in on a tuft of grass or a single budding iris, while depicting shifting views of a field or garden in others. Van Gogh: Up Close not only reveals how these paintings became the most radical and innovative in the artist's body of work but also demonstrates that, far from being a spontaneous or undisciplined artist, Van Gogh was well aware of the history of art and was highly conscious of his efforts to break new ground with his work.

  • Age of Transition - Byzantine Culture in the Islamic World

    In 2012 the Metropolitan Museum of Art presented Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition, a groundbreaking exhibition that explored the transformations and continuities in the Byzantine Empire from the 7th to the 9th century. During this time of historic upheaval, Christian and Jewish communities encountered the world of Islam, resulting in unprecedented cross-cultural exchange. The catalogue for Byzantium and Islam received the 2014 World Book Award as the best new book on Islamic studies, presented by the Islamic Republic of Iran's Ministry of Culture and Religious Guidance. This new volume expands upon the subject, bringing together eleven papers by internationally distinguished scholars delivered in symposia and Scholars' Days during the exhibition, with a new introduction by Helen C. Evans. These writings provide new information about the impact of Byzantine culture, both Christian and Jewish, during the development and early years of Islamic rule in the eastern Mediterranean and across North Africa, and reconsider traditional concepts about the origin of Islamic art.

  • The Age of Doubt - Tracing the Roots of our Religious Uncertainty

    By analyzing the parallel battles over faith and reason in the nineteenth century and ours, scholar Christopher Lane makes a case for the benefits of religious uncertainty.

    The Victorian era was the first great "Age of Doubt" and a critical moment in the history of Western ideas. Leading nineteenth-century intellectuals battled the Church and struggled to absorb radical scientific discoveries that upended everything the Bible had taught them about the world. In The Age of Doubt, distinguished scholar Christopher Lane tells the fascinating story of a society under strain as virtually all aspects of life changed abruptly.

    In deft portraits of scientific, literary, and intellectual icons who challenged the prevailing religious orthodoxy, from Robert Chambers and Anne Bronte to Charles Darwin and Thomas H. Huxley, Lane demonstrates how they and other Victorians succeeded in turning doubt from a religious sin into an ethical necessity.

    The dramatic adjustment of Victorian society has echoes today as technology, science, and religion grapple with moral issues that seemed unimaginable even a decade ago. Yet the Victorians' crisis of faith generated a far more searching engagement with religious belief than the "new atheism" that has evolved today. More profoundly than any generation before them, the Victorians came to view doubt as inseparable from belief, thought, and debate, as well as a much-needed antidote to fanaticism and unbridled certainty. By contrast, a look at today's extremes--from the biblical literalists behind the Creation Museum to the dogmatic rigidity of Richard Dawkins's atheism--highlights our modern-day inability to embrace doubt.

  • Julian of Norwich, Theologian

    For centuries readers have comfortably accepted Julian of Norwich as simply a mystic. In this astute book, Denys Turner offers a new interpretation of Julian and the significance of her work. Turner argues that this fourteenth-century thinker's sophisticated approach to theological questions places her legitimately within the pantheon of other great medieval theologians, including Thomas Aquinas, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Bonaventure.

    Julian wrote but one work in two versions, a Short Text recording the series of visions of Jesus Christ she experienced while suffering a near-fatal illness, and a much expanded Long Text exploring the theological meaning of the "showings" some twenty years later. Turner addresses the apparent conflict between the two sources of Julian's theology: on the one hand, her personal revelation of God's omnipotent love, and on the other, the Church's teachings on and her own witnessing of evil in the world that deserves punishment, even eternal punishment. Offering a fresh and elegant account of Julian's response to this conflict--one that reveals its nuances, systematic character, and originality--this book marks a new stage in the century-long rediscovery of one of the English language's greatest theological thinkers.

  • What Clothes Reveal - The Language of Clothing in Colonial and Federal America

    Paintings of upper-class men and women tell an important part of the history of costumes, but surviving garments themselves reveal even more. Every crease, stitch, and stain in a piece of clothing supplies information about its wearer and its era. This stunning book features eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century garments from the premiere collection of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Illustrated with more than 300 color photographs, including many details and back views, the book treats not only elegant, high-style clothing in colonial America but also garments for everyday and work, the clothing of slaves, and maternity and nursing apparel.

    Drawing on contemporary written descriptions and on actual costumes of the period, the book analyzes what Americans in the eighteenth century considered fashionable and attractive and how they used clothing to assert status or to identify occupations. The book also examines the myths and meanings of clothing in British and American society, clothing for the entire lifecycle, and a history of clothing alteration. Informative sidebars on a variety of fascinating topics complete the volume.

  • Jewels by Jar.

    Called "the Faberge of our time" by Diane von Furstenberg, Joel A. Rosenthal, who works in Paris under the name JAR, is one of the most acclaimed jewelry designers of the past thirty years. JAR is known for his use of precious and semi-precious stones resplendent with myriad shades of vibrant color and set in organic shapes: one brooch, for instance, features lifelike petals in subtly differentiated hues, made from a thousand pave sapphires and amethysts. The New York Times has described his jewelry as "belligerent, stubborn, audacious, funny, contradictory," while JAR himself has characterized his work as "somewhere between geometry and a bouquet of flowers." This book, featuring nearly 40 pieces from throughout JAR's career, provides a concise, accessible, elegantly designed retrospective of the best of his jewelry creations, and is the only book of its kind on his work available in English.

  • The Power of Pictures - Early Soviet Photography, Early Soviet Film

    A fascinating account of the avant-garde photo-based arts from the early Soviet Union, featuring many previously unpublished images

    Finalist for a 2015 National Jewish Book Award in the Visual Arts category

    Following the 1917 Russian Revolution, photography, film, and posters played an essential role in the campaign to disseminate modernity and Communist ideology. From early experimental works by Alexander Rodchenko and El Lissitzky to the modernist photojournalism of Arkady Shaikhet and Max Penson, Soviet photographers were not only in the vanguard of style and technological innovation but also radical in their integration of art and politics. Filmmakers such as Dziga Vertov, Sergei Eisenstein, and Esfir Shub pioneered cinematic techniques for works intended to mobilize viewers.

    Covering the period from the Revolution to the beginning of World War II, The Power of Pictures considers Soviet avant-garde photography and film in the context of political history and culture. Three essays trace this generation of artists, their experiments with new media, and their pursuit of a new political order. A wealth of stunning photographs, film stills, and film posters, as well as magazine and book designs, demonstrate that their output encompassed a spectacular range of style, content, and perspective, and an extraordinary sense of the power of the photograph to change the world.

  • Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon

    When a new technology makes people ill, how high does the body count have to be before protectives steps are taken?

    This disturbing book tells a dark story of hazardous manufacturing, poisonous materials, environmental abuses, political machinations, and economics trumping safety concerns. It explores the century-long history of "fake silk," or cellulose viscose, used to produce such products as rayon textiles and tires, cellophane, and everyday kitchen sponges. Paul Blanc uncovers the grim history of a product that crippled and even served a death sentence to many industry workers while also releasing toxic carbon disulfide into the environment.

    Viscose, an innovative and lucrative product first introduced in the early twentieth century, quickly became a multinational corporate enterprise. Blanc investigates industry practices from the beginning through two highly profitable world wars, the midcentury export of hazardous manufacturing to developing countries, and the current "greenwashing" of viscose as an eco-friendly product. Deeply researched and boldly presented, this book brings to light an industrial hazard whose egregious history ranks with those of asbestos, lead, and mercury.

  • The Words of Others - From Quotations to Culture

    In this lively gambol through the history of quotations and quotation books, Gary Saul Morson traces our enduring fascination with the words of others. Ranging from the remote past to the present, he explores the formation, development, and significance of quotations, while exploring the "verbal museums" in which they have been collected and displayed--commonplace books, treasuries, and anthologies. In his trademark clear, witty, and provocative style, Morson invites readers to share his delight in the shortest literary genre.

    The author defines what makes a quote quotable, as well as the (unexpected) differences between quotation and misquotation. He describes how quotations form, transform, and may eventually become idioms. How much of language itself is the residue of former quotations? Weaving in hundreds of intriguing quotations, common and unusual, Morson explores how the words of others constitute essential elements in the formation of a culture and of the self within that culture. In so doing, he provides a demonstration of that very process, captured in the pages of this extraordinary new book.

  • What They Do With Your Money: How the Financial System Fails Us and How to Fix It

    A call to reboot capitalism and preserve $85 trillion in retirement savings for their owners--not for use as the financial industry's ATM

    Each year we pay billions in fees to those who run our financial system. The money comes from our bank accounts, our pensions, our borrowing, and often we aren't told that the money has been taken. These billions may be justified if the finance industry does a good job, but as this book shows, it too often fails us. Financial institutions regularly place their business interests first, charging for advice that does nothing to improve performance, employing short-term buying strategies that are corrosive to building long-term value, and sometimes even concealing both their practices and their investment strategies from investors.

    In their previous prizewinning book, The New Capitalists, the authors demonstrated how ordinary people are working together to demand accountability from even the most powerful corporations. Here they explain how a tyranny of errant expertise, naive regulation, and a misreading of economics combine to impose a huge stealth tax on our savings and our economies. More important, the trio lay out an agenda for curtailing the misalignments that allow the financial industry to profit at our expense. With our financial future at stake, this is a book that analysts, economists, policy makers, and anyone with a retirement nest egg can't afford to ignore.

  • Faking It - Manipulated Photography before Photoshop

    Photographic manipulation is a familiar phenomenon in the digital era. What will come as a revelation to readers of this captivating, wide-ranging book is that nearly every type of manipulation we associate with Adobe's now-ubiquitous Photoshop software was also part of photography's predigital repertoire, from slimming waistlines and smoothing away wrinkles to adding people to (or removing them from) pictures, not to mention fabricating events that never took place. Indeed, the desire and determination to modify the camera image are as old as photography itself--only the methods have changed.

    By tracing the history of manipulated photography from the earliest days of the medium to the release of Photoshop 1.0 in 1990, Mia Fineman offers a corrective to the dominant narrative of photography's development, in which champions of photographic "purity," such as Paul Strand, Edward Weston, and Henri Cartier-Bresson, get all the glory, while devotees of manipulation, including Henry Peach Robinson, Edward Steichen, and John Heartfield, are treated as conspicuous anomalies. Among the techniques discussed on these pages--abundantly illustrated with works from an international array of public and private collections--are multiple exposure, combination printing, photomontage, composite portraiture, over-painting, hand coloring, and retouching. The resulting images are as diverse in style and motivation as they are in technique. Taking her argument beyond fine art into the realms of politics, journalism, fashion, entertainment, and advertising, Fineman demonstrates that the old adage "the camera does not lie" is one of photography's great fictions.

  • Symbols of POwer - Luxury Textiles from Islamic Lands, 7th-21st Century

    For centuries, luxury textiles were symbols of status, wealth and power at Islamic imperial courts from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean, setting standards for beauty and fuelling prosperous, urban economies. Symbols of Power offers an unparalleled examination of Islamic luxury textiles, drawn from the Cleveland Museum of Art's exemplary collection as well as from museums on four continents. Leading scholar Louise W. Mackie offers a generous overview of the cultural significance of these textiles, as well as descriptions of primary motifs and patterns, and explanations of various techniques used in their production. With singular insight into distinctive artistic characteristics of wealthy dynasties and periods, the text - complemented by more than 450 sumptuous illustrations - pinpoints luxury textiles as a vital link between art, culture and history of the Islamic world. This book offers a much needed contribution to scholarship on both textiles and Islamic art, and paves the way for further study and appreciation of these objects.

  • Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design

    A revealing look at the visionary French furniture designer and architect, highlighting his virtuoso designs and versatile creativity

    The designer and architect Pierre Chareau (1883-1950) was a pivotal figure in modernism. His extraordinary Art Deco furniture is avidly collected and his visionary glass house, the Maison de Verre, is celebrated, but the breadth of his design genius has been little explored. Chareau linked architecture, fine arts, and style; designed furniture for avant-garde films and chic homes; collected artists such as Picasso and Mondrian; and was a radical innovator in the use of materials. Essays by leading scholars embrace the full scope of his invention, offering detailed analyses of individual projects, the interdisciplinary nature of his work, his Jewish background, his place in the avant-garde of Paris between the wars, and his more recent reception. Extensive illustrations present a rich sampling of Chareau's furniture, architecture, interiors, fabrics, and wallpapers, as well as his own important art collection.

  • Art of Empire - The Roman Frescoes and Imperial Cult Chamber in Luxor Temple

    The Luxor Temple of Amun-Re, built to commemorate the divine power of the pharaohs, is one of the iconic monuments of New Kingdom Egypt. In the 4th century C.E., the Roman Imperial government, capitalizing on the site's earlier significance, converted the temple into a military camp and constructed a lavishly painted cult chamber dedicated to the four emperors of the Tetrarchy. These frescoes provide fascinating insight into the political landscape of the late Roman Empire and, as the only surviving wall paintings from the tetrarchic period, into the history of Roman art. The culmination of a groundbreaking conservation project, this volume brings together scholars across disciplines for a comprehensive look at the frescoes and their architectural, archaeological, and historical contexts. More than 150 stunning illustrations present the paintings for the first time in their newly conserved state, along with a selection of 19th-century documentary watercolors. This remarkable publication illustrates how physical context, iconography, and style were used to convey ideology throughout Rome's provinces.

  • Dressing Dangerously - Dysfunctional Fashion in Film

    A thought-provoking examination of the challenging and sometimes sinister roles that fashion has played in the history of cinema

    When Marlene Dietrich makes her entrance in Alfred Hitchcock's Stage Fright, the Dior dress she wears immediately draws the viewer's attention--not because of its designer label, but owing to the dramatic blood stains ruining its stylish surface. Fashion in film goes far beyond glamorous costumes on glamorous stars, as Jonathan Faiers proves in Dressing Dangerously, a pioneering study of the "cinematic negative wardrobe" revealed in mainstream movies. The book emphasizes how problematic, even shocking depictions of dress, until now largely overlooked, play pivotal roles in shaping film narrative.

    Integrating fashion theory, film analysis, and literature, the insightful text investigates the ways cinema influences fashion and, conversely, how fashion speaks to film. The book also reveals how clothing, imbued with its own symbolic meaning, can be read much like a text; when used to provocative effect, for example, in films such as Villain, Leave Her to Heaven, and Casino, the stars' costumes as well as their actions elicit a complex set of emotional responses. Dressing Dangerously brings together a wealth of illustrations, from glossy publicity photos featuring immaculately dressed stars to film stills that capture "dangerously" fashionable moments.

  • The Young Charles Darwin

    What sort of person was the young naturalist who developed an evolutionary idea so logical, so dangerous, that it has dominated biological science for a century and a half? How did the quiet and shy Charles Darwin produce his theory of natural selection when many before him had started down the same path but failed? This book is the first to inquire into the range of influences and ideas, the mentors and rivals, and the formal and informal education that shaped Charles Darwin and prepared him for his remarkable career of scientific achievement. Keith Thomson concentrates on Darwins early life as a schoolboy, a medical student at Edinburgh, a theology student at Cambridge, and a naturalist aboard the Beagle on its famous five-year voyage. Closely analyzing Darwins Autobiography and scientific notebooks, the author draws a fully human portrait of Darwin for the first time: a vastly erudite and powerfully ambitious individual, self-absorbed but lacking self-confidence, hampered as much as helped by family, and sustained by a passion for philosophy and logic. Thomsons account of the birth and maturing of Darwins brilliant theory is fascinating for the way it reveals both his genius as a scientist and the human foibles and weaknesses with which he mightily struggled.

  • Birds of New Zealand - A Photographic Guide

    A must-have guide for anyone interested in the extraordinary birds in New Zealand

    New Zealand's birdlife developed extraordinary diversity as a consequence of evolving on isolated islands without mammalian predators. For many years, habitat destruction brought on by humans posed a distinct threat to the wide variety of birdlife, but thanks to recent conservation efforts, many of the country's species of birds are now protected in parks and island sanctuaries. Illustrated with nearly a thousand new photographs from one of New Zealand's top nature photographers and drawing on the latest information from birders and biologists, Birds of New Zealand offers a definitive introduction to the identification and behavior of the country's extraordinary avian life. The book includes expert and up-to-date information on the 365 bird species found in New Zealand, including species ranging from albatrosses and shearwaters to kiwi and kaka. It will be a valuable addition to the existing literature on birding.

  • The Words of My Perfect Teacher - A Complete Translation of a Classic Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism

    A favorite of Tibetans and recommended by the Dalai Lama and other senior Buddhist teachers, this practical guide to inner transformation introduces the fundamental spiritual practices common to all Tibetan Buddhist traditions.The Words of My Perfect Teacher is the classic commentary on the preliminary practices of the Longchen Nyingtig--one of the best-known cycles of teachings and a spiritual treasure of the Nyingmapa school--the oldest Tibetan Buddhist tradition.

    Patrul Rinpoche makes the technicalities of his subject accessible through a wealth of stories, quotations, and references to everyday life. His style of mixing broad colloquialisms, stringent irony, and poetry has all the life and atmosphere of an oral teaching. Great care has been taken by the translators to render the precise meaning of the text in English while still reflecting the vigor and insight of the original Tibetan.

    A preface by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, insightful introductory essays, explanatory notes, and classic illustrations enhance this quintessential introduction to Tibetan Buddhist practice. This new edition includes translations of a postface to the text written a century ago (for the first printed edition in Tibetan) by the first Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche, and a new preface by the late Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche. The notes, glossary and bibliography have been expanded and updated, Sanskrit names and terminology have been given their proper transliterated form, and the illustrations have been improved in quality and supplemented with new material.

  • The Proteus Paradox - How Online Games and Virtual Worlds Change Us - and How they Don′t

    A surprising assessment of the ways that virtual worlds are entangled with human psychology

    Proteus, the mythical sea god who could alter his appearance at will, embodies one of the promises of online games: the ability to reinvent oneself. Yet inhabitants of virtual worlds rarely achieve this liberty, game researcher Nick Yee contends. Though online games evoke freedom and escapism, Yee shows that virtual spaces perpetuate social norms and stereotypes from the offline world, transform play into labor, and inspire racial scapegoating and superstitious thinking. And the change that does occur is often out of our control and effected by unparalleled--but rarely recognized--tools for controlling what players think and how they behave. Using player surveys, psychological experiments, and in-game data, Yee breaks down misconceptions about who plays fantasy games and the extent to which the online and offline worlds operate separately. With a wealth of entertaining and provocative examples, he explains what virtual worlds are about and why they matter, not only for entertainment but also for business and education. He uses gaming as a lens through which to examine the pressing question of what it means to be human in a digital world. His thought-provoking book is an invitation to think more deeply about virtual worlds and what they reveal to us about ourselves.

  • Among the Celestials - China in Early Photographs

    The flourishing of photography as a medium in the mid-19th century coincided with a rise in curiosity about China on the part of the Western world. As the number of foreigners living and travelling in China increased, early photographs of China were taken by and for an international audience. Among the Celestials assembles 250 fascinating images of China in the second half of the 19th century and first half of the 20th, captured by the Western camera lens. The photographs portray the gritty side of the country as well as stunning views of palaces, temples, harbours and gardens. This juxtaposition of the sordid and the serene provides a multidimensional picture of China's physical and social landscape before Mao Zedong's ascent to power changed the country forever. The photographs, many published here for the first time, are both beautiful and moving, and together offer a new understanding of a social and cultural history associated with a time of significant historical change.

  • The Spirit of the Quakers

    Who are the Quakers, what do they believe, and what do they practise? At the heart of their faith lies the conviction that everyone can have a direct experience of God without the mediation of priests or religious leaders. They express this in a unique form of worship that inspires them to work for change in themselves and in the world. In 'The Spirit of the Quakers', Geoffrey Durham introduces Quakerism through quotations from writings that cover 350 years, from the beginnings of the movement to the present day. This anthology shares the religious experience of Quakers both in their worship and in the world. Peacemaking, simplicity, truth, and equality are major spiritual themes, but readers will also find rich and varied writing on the Quakers wide diversity of belief, their collective values, their insistence on taking action for social change and their understanding that we can answer 'that of God in everyone'. The extended quotations have been carefully selected from well-known Quakers such as George Fox, William Penn, John Greenleaf Whittier, Elizabeth Fry and John Woolman, as well as many contemporary authors. Together with Geoffrey Durham's enlightening and sympathetic introductions to the texts, the writers gathered here provide an engaging, often moving guide to this accessible and open-hearted religious faith.

  • Asian America: A Primary Source Reader

    An essential collection that brings together the core primary texts of the Asian American experience in one volume

    An essential volume for the growing academic discipline of Asian American studies, this collection of core primary texts draws from a wide range of fields, from law to visual culture to politics, covering key historical and cultural developments that enable students to engage directly with the Asian American experience over the past century. The primary sources, organized around keywords, often concern multiple hemispheres and movements, making this compendium valuable for a number of historical, ethnic, and cultural study undergraduate programs.

  • The Synagogues of Britain and Ireland - An Architectual and Social History

    The religious buildings of the Jewish community in Britain have never been explored in print. Lavishly illustrated with previously unpublished images and photographs taken specially by English Heritage, this book traces the architecture of the synagogue in Britain and Ireland from its discreet Georgian- and Regency-era beginnings to the golden age of the grand "cathedral synagogues" of the High Victorian period. Sharman Kadish sheds light on obscure and sometimes underappreciated architects who designed synagogues for all types of worshipers--from Orthodox and Reform congregations to Yiddish-speaking immigrants in the 1900s. She examines the relationship between architectural style and minority identity in British society and looks at design issues in the contemporary synagogue.

  • Love - A History

    An illuminating exploration of how love has been shaped, idolized, and misconstrued by the West over three millennia, and how we might differently conceive it

    Love--unconditional, selfless, unchanging, sincere, and totally accepting--is worshipped today as the West's only universal religion. To challenge it is one of our few remaining taboos. In this pathbreaking and superbly written book, philosopher Simon May does just that, dissecting our resilient ruling ideas of love and showing how they are the product of a long and powerful cultural heritage.

    Tracing over 2,500 years of human thought and history, May shows how our ideal of love developed from its Hebraic and Greek origins alongside Christianity until, during the last two centuries, "God is love" became "love is God"--so hubristic, so escapist, so untruthful to the real nature of love, that it has booby-trapped relationships everywhere with deluded expectations. Brilliantly, May explores the very different philosophers and writers, both skeptics and believers, who dared to think differently: from Aristotle's perfect friendship and Ovid's celebration of sex and "the chase," to Rousseau's personal authenticity, Nietzsche's affirmation, Freud's concepts of loss and mourning, and boredom in Proust. Against our belief that love is an all-powerful solution to finding meaning, security, and happiness in life, May reveals with great clarity what love actually is: the intense desire for someone whom we believe can ground and affirm our very existence. The feeling that "makes the world go round" turns out to be a harbinger of home--and in that sense, of the sacred.

  • The Philosophers′ Quarrel - Rousseau, Hume and the Limits of Human Understanding

    The rise and spectacular fall of the friendship between the two great philosophers of the eighteenth century, barely six months after they first met, reverberated on both sides of the Channel. As the relationship between Jean-Jacques Rousseau and David Hume unravelled, a volley of rancorous letters was fired off, then quickly published and devoured by aristocrats, intellectuals and common readers, alike. Everyone took sides in this momentous dispute between the greatest of Enlightenment thinkers. In this lively and revealing book, Robert Zaretsky and John T. Scott explore the unfolding rift between Rousseau and Hume. The authors are particularly fascinated by the connection between the thinkers' lives and thought, especially the way that their failure to understand one another (and themselves) illuminates the limits of human understanding. In addition, they situate the philosophers' quarrel in the social, political and intellectual milieu that informed their actions, as well as the actions of the other participants in the dispute, such as James Boswell, Adam Smith and Voltaire. By examining the conflict through the prism of each philosopher's contribution to Western thought, Zaretsky and Scott reveal the implications for the two men as individuals and philosophers as well as for the contemporary world, which remains deeply influenced by the Enlightenment.

  • Imprinting the Devine - Byzantine and Russian Icons from the Menil Collection

    The Menil's collection of Byzantine and related icons is widely regarded as one of the most important in the United States. Comprising more than sixty works, many acquired by Dominique de Menil in 1985 from the noted British collector Eric Bradley, the group spans twelve hundred years, from the sixth to the eighteenth centuries, and encompasses a number of distinct cultures, including Greek, Balkan, and Russian. In this volume, the first publication to survey this diverse collection, leading scholars explore the history and meaning of these remarkable works, and their continuing power to surprise and impress.

    Orthodox Christianity developed in the Near East during the Byzantine Empire, in time yielding eleven autocephalous communions of which the Greek, Russian, Romanian, Serbian, and Bulgarian Orthodox churches are the largest today. Each maintained the tradition of icon painting rooted in Byzantium but inflected it in distinctive ways. Transcending time and place through a delicate balance of tradition and innovation, these images of saintly or divine figures were designed to imprint their holy subjects on the human mind. Though largely dismissed as backward by Renaissance and Enlightenment Europeans, icons captured the imagination of early modernist painters, and contemporary audiences appreciate them as aesthetic objects.

  • Mark Rothko - From the Inside Out

    "The journey to understand the painting is also the journey to understand Rothko, because the work is so thoroughly suffused with the man."--Christopher Rothko

    Mark Rothko (1903-1970), world-renowned icon of Abstract Expressionism, is rediscovered in this wholly original examination of his art and life written by his son. Synthesizing rigorous critique with personal anecdotes, Christopher, the younger of the artist's two children, offers a unique perspective on this modern master.

    Christopher Rothko draws on an intimate knowledge of the artworks to present eighteen essays that look closely at the paintings and explore the ways in which they foster a profound connection between viewer and artist through form, color, and scale. The prominent commissions for the Rothko Chapel in Houston and the Seagram Building murals in New York receive extended treatment, as do many of the lesser-known and underappreciated aspects of Rothko's oeuvre, including reassessments of his late dark canvases and his formidable body of works on paper. The author also discusses the artist's writings of the 1930s and 1940s, the significance of music to the artist, and our enduring struggles with visual abstraction in the contemporary era. Finally, Christopher Rothko writes movingly about his role as the artist's son, his commonalities with his father, and the terms of the relationship they forged during the writer's childhood.

    Mark Rothko: From the Inside Out is a thoughtful reexamination of the legendary artist, serving as a passionate introduction for readers new to his work and offering a fresh perspective to those who know it well.

  • Leonardo, Michelangelo, and the Art of the Figure

    In late 1504 and early 1505, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) were both at work on commissions they had received to paint murals in Florence's City Hall. Leonardo was to depict a historic battle between Florence and Milan, Michelangelo one between Florence and Pisa. Though neither project was ever completed, the painters' mythic encounter shaped art and its history in the decades and centuries that followed.

    This concise, lucid, and thought-provoking book looks again at the one moment when Leonardo and Michelangelo worked side by side, seeking to identify the roots of their differing ideas of the figure in 15th-century pictorial practices and to understand what this contrast meant to the artists and writers who followed them. Through close investigation of these two artists, Michael W. Cole provides a new account of critical developments in Italian Renaissance painting.

  • The New Universe and the Human Future - How a Shared Cosmology Could Transform the World

    After a four-century rupture between science and the questions of value and meaning, this groundbreaking book presents an explosive and potentially life-altering idea: if the world could agree on a shared creation story based on modern cosmology and biology - a story that has just become available - it would redefine our relationship with Planet Earth and benefit all of humanity, now and into the distant future. Written in eloquent, accessible prose and illustrated with magnificent colour images throughout, including innovative simulations of the evolving universe, this book brings the new scientific picture of the universe to life. It interprets what our human place in the cosmos may mean for us and our descendants. It offers unique insights into how this newfound knowledge could potentially be used to find solutions to seemingly intractable global problems such as climate change and unsustainable growth. It explains why we need to 'think cosmically, act globally' in order to have a long-term, prosperous future on Earth.

  • Jacob A. Riis: Revealing New York`s "Other Half" - A Complete Catalogue of His Photographs

    The definitive study of the images made by a pioneer journalist and photographer who passionately advocated for America's urban poor

    Danish-born Jacob A. Riis (1849-1914) found success in America as a reporter for the New York Tribune, first documenting crime and later turning his eye to housing reform. As tenement living conditions became unbearable in the wake of massive immigration, Riis and his camera captured some of the earliest, most powerful images of American urban poverty.

    This important publication is the first comprehensive study and complete catalogue of Riis's world-famous images, and places him at the forefront of early-20th-century social reform photography. It is the culmination of more than two decades of research on Riis, assembling materials from five repositories (the Riis Collection at the Museum of the City of New York, the Library of Congress, the New-York Historical Society, the New York Public Library, and the Museum of South West Jutland, Denmark) as well as previously unpublished photographs and notes. In this handsome volume, Bonnie Yochelson proposes a novel thesis--that Riis was a radical publicist who utilized photographs to enhance his arguments, but had no great skill or ambition as a photographer. She also provides important context for understanding how Riis's work would be viewed in turn-of-the-century New York, whether presented in lantern slide lectures or newspapers.

  • Tainted Glory in Handel′s Messiah - The Unsettling History of the World′s Most Beloved Choral Work

    An eye-opening reexamination of Handel's beloved religious oratorio

    Every Easter, audiences across the globe thrill to performances of Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus," but they would probably be appalled to learn the full extent of the oratorio's anti-Judaic message. In this pioneering study, respected musicologist Michael Marissen examines Handel's masterwork and uncovers a disturbing message of anti-Judaism buried within its joyous celebration of the divinity of the Christ.

    Discovering previously unidentified historical source materials enabled the author to investigate the circumstances that led to the creation of the Messiah and expose the hateful sentiments masked by magnificent musical artistry--including the famed "Hallelujah Chorus," which rejoices in the "dashing to pieces" of God's enemies, among them the "people of Israel." Marissen's fascinating, provocative work offers musical scholars and general readers alike an unsettling new appreciation of one of the world's best-loved and most widely performed works of religious music.

  • Czechoslovakia - The State that Failed

    This book, the most thoroughly researched and accurate history of Czechoslovakia to appear in English, tells the story of the country from its founding in 1918 to partition in 1992--from fledgling democracy through Nazi occupation, Communist rule, and invasion by the Soviet Union to, at last, democracy again.

    The common Western view of Czechoslovakia has been that of a small nation that was sacrificed at Munich in 1938 and betrayed to the Soviets in 1948, and which rebelled heroically against the repression of the Soviet Union during the Prague Spring of 1968. Mary Heimann dispels these myths and shows how intolerant nationalism and an unhelpful sense of victimhood led Czech and Slovak authorities to discriminate against minorities, compete with the Nazis to persecute Jews and Gypsies, and pave the way for the Communist police state. She also reveals Alexander Dubcek, held to be a national hero and standard-bearer for democracy, to be an unprincipled apparatchik. Well written, revisionist, and accessible, this groundbreaking book should become the standard history of Czechoslovakia for years to come.

  • George Frederick Bodley & The Later Gothic Revival in Britain and America

    British architect George Frederick Bodley (1827-1907) fundamentally shaped the architecture, art, and design of the Anglican Church throughout England and the world; his work survives in the United States, Australia, India, and Italy, as well as the United Kingdom. This important book is the first to explore the life and work of this major Gothic Revival architect, a man with an evolving outlook on style and aesthetics who believed that every element of a building must be part of an integrated design strategy. A close colleague of William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones, Bodley was the first major patron of Morris's stained glass and, like Morris, was an accomplished textile and wallpaper designer. In 1874 Bodley founded Watts and Company--now celebrating its 140th anniversary--to manufacture ecclesiastical vestments, textiles, and wallpapers. In a seamless blend of architectural, art, and church history, this lavish volume features over 200 illustrations and offers impeccable scholarship on the work of an influential visionary of Victorian design.

  • Knoll Textiles, 1945-2010

    The first comprehensive study of Knoll's innovative textile designs and the company's role within the history of interior design

    In 1940, Hans Knoll founded a company in New York that soon earned a reputation for its progressive line of furniture. Florence Schust joined the firm and helped establish its interior design division, the Knoll Planning Unit. In 1947, the year after their marriage, Hans and Florence Knoll added a third division, Knoll Textiles, which brought textile production in line with a modern sensibility that used color and texture as primary design elements. In the early years, the company hired leading proponents of modern design as well as young, untried designers to create textile patterns. The division thrived in the late 1940s through 1960s and, in the following decade, adopted a more international outlook as design direction shifted to Europe. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Knoll tapped fashion designers and architects to bolster its brand. The pioneering use of new materials and a commitment to innovative design have remained Knoll's hallmarks to the present day.

    With essays by experts, biographies of about eighty designers, and images of textiles, drawings, furniture, and ephemera, Knoll Textiles, 1945-2010 is the first comprehensive study devoted to a leading contributor to modern textile design. Highlighting the individuals and ideas that helped shape Knoll Textiles over the years, this book brings the Knoll brand and the role of textiles in the history of design to the forefront of public attention.

  • On Color

    Ranging from Homer to Picasso, and from the Iranian Revolution to The Wizard of Oz, this spirited and radiant book awakens us anew to the role of color in our lives

    Our lives are saturated by color. We live in a world of vivid colors, and color marks our psychological and social existence. But for all color's inescapability, we don't know much about it. Now authors David Scott Kastan and Stephen Farthing offer a fresh and imaginative exploration of one of the most intriguing and least understood aspects of everyday experience.

    Kastan and Farthing, a scholar and a painter, respectively, investigate color from numerous perspectives: literary, historical, cultural, anthropological, philosophical, art historical, political, and scientific. In ten lively and wide-ranging chapters, each devoted to a different color, they examine the various ways colors have shaped and continue to shape our social and moral imaginations. Each individual color becomes the focal point for a consideration of one of the extraordinary ways in which color appears and matters in our lives. Beautifully produced in full color, this book is a remarkably smart, entertaining, and fascinating guide to this elusive topic.

  • Tales from the Long Twelfth Century: The Rise and Fall of the Angevin Empire

    This intriguing book tells the story of England's great medieval Angevin dynasty in an entirely new way. Departing from the usual king-centric narrative, Richard Huscroft instead centers each of his chapters on the experiences of a particular man or woman who contributed to the broad sweep of events. Whether noble and brave or flawed and fallible, each participant was struggling to survive in the face of uncontrollable forces. Princes, princesses, priests, heroes, relatives, friends, and others--some well known and others obscure--all were embroiled in the drama of historic events.

    Under Henry II and his sons Richard I (the Lionheart) and John, the empire rose to encompass much of the British Isles and the greater part of modern France, yet it survived a mere fifty years. Huscroft deftly weaves together the stories of individual lives to illuminate the key themes of this exciting and formative era.

  • Make it New - Abstract Painting from National Gallery of Art

    Featuring thirty-five outstanding abstract paintings made between 1950 and 1975 from the collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, this fascinating book casts a new glance at a renowned period in the history of art, including works by Lynda Benglis, Jasper Johns, Yayoi Kusama, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko. A groundbreaking essay by Harry Cooper explores Pollock's preeminent role for these and other artists, analyzes artistic influence, and discusses what it means to be original. Focusing on Frank Stella, Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Robert Ryman, Cy Twombly, and Simon Hantai, and viewing their relationships to Pollock through the lens of Harold Bloom's seminal text The Anxiety of Influence, Cooper addresses the material, psychological, and thematic ties between Pollock's work and theirs and expands the circle of artists that we might consider his artistic heirs.

  • Dressing Up - Fashion Week NYC

    Candid portraits by acclaimed photographer Lee Friedlander showcase the many hands at work behind New York Fashion Week

    Lee Friedlander (b. 1934) is one of the most renowned photographers of his generation. Through Friedlander's lens, people in their everyday environments are transformed into arresting portraits, and the banal features of roadsides, storefronts, and city streets become vivid scenery. In Dressing Up, Friedlander ventures into new territory, turning his eye to the rarefied world of fashion and revealing precisely what is commonplace about it: behind the glamorous spectacle of the runway are many people hard at work.

    The photographs, commissioned by the New York Times Magazine, were taken in 2006 during New York Fashion Week, when the artist spent time backstage at the Marc Jacobs, Donna Karan, Calvin Klein, Zac Posen, Oscar de la Renta, and Proenza Schouler shows. The resulting images, many of which are published here for the first time, depict a flurry of toiling stylists, dressers, makeup artists, photographers, and models--all of them preparing, but not quite prepared, for an image to be taken. Lovers of photography and high-end fashion will be surprised and intrigued by this inside glimpse into the world of runway design.

  • A Little History of Philosophy

    Philosophy begins with questions about the nature of reality and how we should live. These were the concerns of Socrates, who spent his days in the ancient Athenian marketplace asking awkward questions, disconcerting the people he met by showing them how little they genuinely understood. This engaging book introduces the great thinkers in Western philosophy and explores their most compelling ideas about the world and how best to live in it. In forty brief chapters, Nigel Warburton takes us on a chronological tour of the major ideas in the history of philosophy. He provides interesting and often quirky stories of the lives and deaths of thought-provoking philosophers from Socrates, who chose to die by hemlock poisoning rather than live on without the freedom to think for himself, to Peter Singer, who asks the disquieting philosophical and ethical questions that haunt our own times. Warburton not only makes philosophy accessible, he offers inspiration to think, argue, reason, and question in the tradition of Socrates. "A Little History of Philosophy" presents the grand sweep of humanity's search for philosophical understanding and invites all to join in the discussion.

  • The Constitutional Parent - Rights, Responsibilities, and the Enfranchisement of the Child

    In this bold and timely work, law professor Jeffrey Shulman argues that the United States Constitution does not protect a fundamental right to parent. Based on a rigorous reconsideration of the historical record, Shulman challenges the notion, held by academics and the general public alike, that parental rights have a long-standing legal pedigree. What is deeply rooted in our legal tradition and social conscience, Shulman demonstrates, is the idea that the state entrusts parents with custody of the child, and it does so only as long as parents meet their fiduciary duty to serve the developmental needs of the child.

    Shulman's illuminating account of American legal history is of more than academic interest. If once again we treat parenting as a delegated responsibility--as a sacred trust, not a sacred right--we will not all reach the same legal prescriptions, but we might be more willing to consider how time-honored principles of family law can effectively accommodate the evolving interests of parent, child, and state.

  • Heroic Armor of the Italian Renaissance: Filippo Negroli and His Contemporaries

    The second quarter of the sixteenth century witnessed the emergence of a new fashion of armor design based on the forms and ornament found in classical art. Embossed in high relief, richly gilt, and damascened in gold and silver, these lavish parade armors "all'antica" were worn by Renaissance kings and captains who wished to project an aura of power and virtue by arraying themselves like the heroes of ancient Roman history and mythology. The re-creation of classically inspired armor is invariably associated with Filippo Negroli, the most innovative and celebrated of the renowned armorers of Milan. Within the Negroli family of armorers, Filippo was the best known of his extremely successful generation, which included his brother Francesco, a skilled damascener in the service of Emperor Charles V, and his cousin Giovan Paolo, a talented master who provided armor to the French court. From large numbers of recently uncovered documents in the state, civic, and ecclesiastical archives of Milan, details have been gleaned of Negroli family members, their workshops and employees, marriages and deaths, property and testamentary arrangements, and business dealings with clients and fellow armorers. A digest of the documents is included, and a brief, cogent discussion of the manufacture and commerce of arms in sixteenth-century Milan provides a context for the work of these talented artists. The core of the book is a thorough reexamination of all the armors signed by Filippo Negroli. Additional works are attributed to him, and lost works are identified. The authors confirm the attribution of two magnificently damascened armors to Francesco Negroli, and they present Giovan Paolo Negroli's single signed work along with pieces they consider to be his. Each armor is described, illustrated, and placed in the context of the maker's oeuvre; its history of ownership is discussed; and its treatment in the critical literature is assessed.

    Around these superlative examples of Renaissance armor "all'antica" are grouped works that demonstrate the strong influence of the Negroli on contemporary Italian armorers as well as the variety and originality of armor design during the years 153555. The authors also touch on the sources of Renaissance armor through Greek and Roman prototypes, fourteenth- and fifteenth-century versions of classical-style armor, and sixteenth-century albums of designs. In the hands of a master like Filippo Negroli, whose virtuoso skill at modeling in high relief is unrivaled in the history of metalworking, traditional military costume was transformed into sculpture in steel. The extraordinary technical abilities of the Milanese armorers, combined with their imaginative adaptation of decorative motifs from the antique, such as lion and Medusa heads, fantastic creatures, and abundant foliate ornament, gave rise to an original art form that evokes the pomp and pageantry of the Renaissance courts. These treasured objects, many of which are still part of the royal collections they have been in since the sixteenth century, are generously illustrated in this book, which serves as the catalogue of an exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. [This book was originally published in 1998 and has gone out of print. This edition is a print-on-demand version of the original book.]"

  • The Funk & Wag from A to Z

    This striking, oversized book, designed to evoke encyclopedias, is a highly creative amalgam of collage with a political bent and poetry. From 2011 to 2012, American artist Mel Chin (b. 1951) extracted all of the images from a twenty-five-volume set of Funk & Wagnall's Universal Standard Encyclopedia (ca. 1953-56) and began visually re-editing. Thousands of images rendered by photomechanical reproduction that served a populist, mid-century encyclopedia are reconfigured with 21st-century hindsight and idiosyncratic connections that convey social and artistic commentaries. Surrealism, humor, sarcasm, politics, history, and beauty permeate these sometimes raucous, often confounding, but consistently stunning images. Over 500 black-and-white collages are accompanied by twenty-five poems, one per encyclopedia volume, commissioned by Chin and author Nick Flynn specifically for this publication. Writers range from the well-known to the surprising. The Funk & Wag from A to Z offers mischievous fun with pointed commentary and hilarity.

  • Antony and Cleopatra

    From the prizewinning author of Caesar and How Rome Fell, a major new account of the charged love affair between Antony and Cleopatra, richly informed by military and political history

    A masterfully told--and deeply human--story of love, politics, and ambition, Adrian Goldsworthy's Antony and Cleopatra delivers a compelling reassessment of a major episode in ancient history.

    In this remarkable dual biography of the two great lovers of the ancient world, Goldsworthy goes beyond myth and romance to create a nuanced and historically acute portrayal of his subjects, set against the political backdrop of their time. A history of lives lived intensely at a time when the world was changing profoundly, the book takes readers on a journey that crosses cultures and boundaries from ancient Greece and ancient Egypt to the Roman Empire.

    Drawing on his prodigious knowledge of the ancient world and his keen sense of the period's military and political history, Goldsworthy creates a singular portrait of the iconic lovers. "Antony and Cleopatra were first and foremost political animals," explains Goldsworthy, who places politics and ideology at the heart of their storied romance. Undertaking a close analysis of ancient sources and archaeological evidence, Goldsworthy bridges the gaps of current scholarship and dispels misconceptions that have entered the popular consciousness. He explains why Cleopatra was consistently portrayed by Hollywood as an Egyptian, even though she was really Greek, and argues that Antony had far less military experience than anyone would suspect from reading Shakespeare and other literature. Goldsworthy makes an important case for understanding Antony as a powerful Roman senator and political force in his own right.

  • The Itinerant Languages of Photography

    Honorable Mention, Exhibition Catalogues -- 2014 AAM Museum Publications Design Competition

    While photographs have been exchanged, appropriated, and mobilized in different contexts since the 19th century, their movement is now occurring at an unprecedented speed. The Itinerant Languages of Photography examines photography's capacity to circulate across time and space as well as across other media, such as art, literature, and cinema. Taking its point of departure from Latin American and Spanish photographic archives, the volume offers an alternative history of photography by focusing on the transnational dimension of technological traffic and image production at a time when photography is at the center of current debates on the role of representation, authorship, and reception in a global contemporary culture.

    Featuring a wide-range of photographs--images that converse across temporal, political, and cultural boundaries by artists such as Lola and Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Marcelo Brodsky, Joan Colom, Marc Ferrez, and Joan Fontcuberta--the book argues that the photographic image comes into being only as a consequence of reproduction, displacement, and itinerancy.

  • An American Style - Global Sources for New York Textiles and Fahion Design, 1915-1927

    In 1915 the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) embarked upon a mission to energize the American textile industry. Curators sought to innovate a distinctly "American" design idiom drawing on a more universal "primitive" language. Ethnographic objects were included in study rooms; designers gained access to storage rooms; and museum artifacts were loaned to design houses and department stores. In order to attract designers and reluctant manufacturers, who quickly responded, collections were supplemented with specimens including fur garments from Siberia, Persian costumes, and Javanese textiles. This book positions the project at the AMNH in the broader narrative of early 20th-century design education in New York, which includes the roles of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Newark Museum.

  • Jennifer Bartlett - History of the Universe Works 1970-2011

    A critical and commercial success since the 1970s, Jennifer Bartlett (b. 1941) has become one of the most visionary and influential artists of our time. In the words of New York Times critic John Russell, Bartlett's art "enlarges our notion of time, and of memory, and of change, and of painting itself." Her abundant intelligence and inventiveness allow her to synthesize diverse sources and styles, and imbue her paintings with expressive life and moral imagination. Included in this handsome volume are an intimate interview with the artist and an excerpt from History of the Universe, Bartlett's first novel, giving further insight into the thought processes of this uniquely creative artist.

  • Who Speaks for the Negro?

    In 1964, Robert Penn Warren interviewed leaders, activists, and artists engaged in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. His interviewees included well-known figures such as Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, and James Baldwin, as well as lesser-known individuals whose names might otherwise be lost to history. Transcripts from these interviews, combined with Warren's reflections on the movement, were first published in 1965 as Who Speaks for the Negro? This unique text in the history of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement serves as a powerful oral history of an all-important struggle. A new introduction by David W. Blight places the book in historical perspective.

    "Warren's book remains a luminous volume about race, racism, the South, black America, and our national destiny. We ignore or forget his work at our peril."--Arnold Rampersad, Stanford University

    "Not exactly a stroll down memory lane and certainly not a song to sing, yet WhoSpeaks for the Negro? brings back a question one would have thought already answered. We still search America's soul for how to and who to include. This is still a book worthy of your time and somehow still a part of ours."--Nikki Giovanni

    "Fifty years later, we have this archival treasure that demonstrates why the Civil Rights Movement in fact gave our land its second equality, life, and liberty movement."--Reverend James M. Lawson, Jr.

  • Shadows - The Depiction of Cast Shadows in Western Art

    In this intriguing book, E.H. Gombrich, who was one of the world's foremost art historians, traces how cast shadows have been depicted in Western art through the centuries. Gombrich discusses the way shadows were represented--or ignored--by artists from the Renaissance to the 17th century and then describes how Romantic, Impressionist, and Surrealist artists exploited the device of the cast shadow to enhance the illusion of realism or drama in their representations. First published to accompany an exhibition at the National Gallery, London, in 1995, it is reissued here with additional color illustrations and a new introduction by esteemed scholar Nicholas Penny. It is also now available as an enhanced eBook, with zoomable images and accompanying film footage.

  • Contemporary Drawings from the Irving Stenn, Jr., Collection

    This handsome volume offers a rare and exclusive look at important holdings of a private collection in Chicago, showcasing 120 drawings by some of the leading artists of the postwar period. Among the featured artists are Roy Lichtenstein, Barnett Newman, Robert Rauschenberg, and Frank Stella. Also illustrated are thirteen early drawings by Mel Bochner; works on paper by Sol Le Witt and Brice Marden; and individual sheets by Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Bruce Nauman, Bridget Riley, Ed Ruscha, and Robert Ryman. Mark Pascale discusses specific drawings by these artists and their relationship to Minimalist and Post-Minimalist styles. He also investigates the importance of drawings produced by sculptors, which offer fascinating glimpses into their creative processes. An interview with the collector reveals the inspiration behind his holdings and the ways in which his collection has grown over the years, and a full-colour plate section and complete checklist of the collection round out this compelling book.

  • Boyle - Between God and Science

    Robert Boyle ranks with Newton and Einstein as one of the worlds most important scientists. Aristocrat and natural philosopher, he was a remarkably wide-ranging and penetrating thinker - pioneering the modern experimental method, championing a novel mechanical view of nature, and reflecting deeply on philosophical and theological issues related to science. But, as Michael Hunter shows, Boyle was also a complex and contradictory personality, fascinated by alchemy and magic and privately plagued with doubts about faith and conscience, which troubled the rational vision he heralded. This extraordinary work is the first biography of Boyle in a generation, and the culminating achievement of a world-renowned expert on the scientist. Deftly navigating Boyles voluminous published works as well as his personal letters and papers, Hunters complete and intimate account gives us the man rather than the myth, the troubled introvert as well as the public campaigner. Lively, perceptive, and full of original insights, this is the definitive account of a remarkable man and the changing world in which he lived.

  • Avant-Garde Art in Everyday Life - Early Twentieth-Century European Modernism

    Beginning around 1910, vanguard artists demanded that true art go beyond the intellectual and transform daily life. This volume highlights the work of six influential European artists who took this idea into the wider world, where it merged enthusiastically with demands in the industrial marketplace, the nascent mass media, and urban popular culture.

    Featured are Piet Zwart, a Dutch designer who brought his minimalist aesthetic vision to ubiquitous items like biscuit boxes and postage stamps; Karel Teige, leader of the Czech avant-garde, who produced brilliant book and journal designs; his compatriot Ladislav Sutnar, who brought modernist "good design" to tableware, clothing, and children's toys; Gustav Klutsis, who pioneered using photomontage for political purposes; Lazar (El) Lissitzky, who produced some of the most exciting book, poster, and exhibition designs of the 1920s and '30s in Germany and Russia; and German artist John Heartfield, who worked exclusively in photomontage to design book covers, journals, and agitational posters for the Communist cause.

  • Xerxes - A Persian Life

    The first full-scale account of a Persian king vilified by history

    Xerxes, Great King of the Persian Empire from 486-465 B.C., has gone down in history as an angry tyrant full of insane ambition. The stand of Leonidas and the 300 against his army at Thermopylae is a byword for courage, while the failure of Xerxes' expedition has overshadowed all the other achievements of his twenty-two-year reign.

    In this lively and comprehensive new biography, Richard Stoneman shows how Xerxes, despite sympathetic treatment by the contemporary Greek writers Aeschylus and Herodotus, had his reputation destroyed by later Greek writers and by the propaganda of Alexander the Great. Stoneman draws on the latest research in Achaemenid studies and archaeology to present the ruler from the Persian perspective. This illuminating volume does not whitewash Xerxes' failings but sets against them such triumphs as the architectural splendor of Persepolis and a consideration of Xerxes' religious commitments. What emerges is a nuanced portrait of a man who ruled a vast and multicultural empire which the Greek communities of the West saw as the antithesis of their own values.

  • Edward II

    The latest definitive biography in the acclaimed Yale English Monarchs series

    Edward II (1284-1327), King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine, was the object of ignominy during his lifetime and calumny since it. Conventionally viewed as worthless, incapable of sustained policy, and significant only for his sporadic displays of ill-directed energy or a stubborn adherence to greedy and ambitious favorites, he has been presented as fit only to be deposed and replaced by someone more worthy of the throne.

    This definitive biography, the fruit of a lifetime's study, does not present Edward II as a heroic or successful king: his deposition after a turbulent reign of nearly twenty years is proof enough that it went terribly wrong. But Seymour Phillips' scrutiny of the multitude of available sources shows that a richer picture emerges, in line with the complexity of events and of the man himself. If Edward II was not a successful king, he was not fundamentally different in many ways from most English monarchs. The biography strikes a deft balance, taking full account of the problems the king faced in England, Scotland, and Ireland and in his relations with France. It also tackles the contentious issue of whether Edward II did not die in 1327, murdered under barbaric circumstances, but lived on as a captive in England and then a wanderer on the Continent. Eight hundred years on, a king's life is properly examined.

  • Lawrence of Arabia's War: The Arabs, The British and the Remaking of the Middle East in WWI

    A wealth of new research and thinking on Lawrence, the Arab Revolt, and World War One in the Middle East, providing essential background to today's violent conflicts

    Rarely is a book published that revises our understanding of an entire world region and the history that has defined it. This groundbreaking volume makes just such a contribution. Neil Faulkner draws on ten years of field research to offer the first truly multidisciplinary history of the conflicts that raged in Sinai, Arabia, Palestine, and Syria during the First World War.

    In Lawrence of Arabia's War, the author rewrites the history of T. E. Lawrence's legendary military campaigns in the context of the Arab Revolt. He explores the intersections among the declining Ottoman Empire, the Bedouin tribes, nascent Arab nationalism, and Western imperial ambition. The book provides a new analysis of Ottoman resilience in the face of modern industrialized warfare, and it assesses the relative weight of conventional operations in Palestine and irregular warfare in Syria. Faulkner thus reassesses the historic roots of today's divided, fractious, war-torn Middle East.

  • Ham House - Four Hundred Years of Collecting and Patronage

    Built in 1610 during the reign of James I and remodeled in 1637-39 by the future first Earl of Dysart, Ham House and its gardens have endured through centuries of English history while remaining representative of the styles and culture of the original inhabitants. It is one of the few places where Caroline decor--as developed by British architect Inigo Jones and familiar to Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck--can still be appreciated.

    To mark the 400th anniversary of one of the most famous houses in Europe, eighteen internationally recognized scholars join National Trust curators in documenting the history of Ham House and its collections. The new discoveries, reattributions, and revelations of the contributors are accompanied by specially commissioned photography of the house and its contents. An appendix includes complete transcriptions of house inventories for the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, published here for the first time.

  • Art of Armor - Samurai Armor from The Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection

    This extraordinary publication presents, for the first time, the Samurai armour collection of the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum in Dallas, Texas. The Barbier-Mueller has selectively amassed these pieces of armour over the past twenty-five years, ultimately forming one of the largest and most important collections of its kind in the world. It is comprised of nearly three hundred objects, several of which are considered masterpieces, including suits of armour, helmets, masks, horse armour, and weaponry. The objects date from the 12th to the 19th century, with a particularly strong focus on Edo-period armour. Offering an exciting look into the world of the Samurai warrior, this book begins with an introduction by Morihiro Ogawa. Essays by prominent scholars in the field highlight topics such as the phenomenon of the warrior in Japan, the development of the Samurai helmet, castle architecture, women in Samurai culture, and Japanese horse armour. The book's final section consists of an extensive catalogue of objects, concentrating on 120 significant works in the collection. Lavishly illustrated in full colour, each object is accompanied by an entry written by a scholar of Japanese armour.

  • Men from the Ministry - How Britain Saved its Heritage

    Between 1900 and 1950 the British state amassed a huge collection of over 800 historic buildings, monuments, and sites and opened them to the public. This engaging book explains why the extraordinary collecting frenzy took place, locating it in the fragile and nostalgic atmosphere of the interwar years, dominated by neo-romanticism and cultural protectionism. The government's activities were mirrored by the establishment of dozens of voluntary bodies, including the Council for the Protection of Rural England, the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, and the National Trust. Men from the Ministry sets all this activity, for the first time, in its political, economic and cultural contexts, painting a picture of a country traumatized by war, fearful of losing what was left of its history, and a government that actively set out to protect them. It dissects a government program that established a modern state on deep historical and rural roots.

  • Constructing the Ineffable - Contemporary Sacred Architecture

    Throughout the history of the built environment there has been no more significant endeavor than the construction of houses of worship, which were once the focal point around which civilizations and city-states developed. Constructing the Ineffable is the first book to examine this topic across continents and from the perspective of multiple faiths, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and Baha'i. It addresses how sacred buildings such as churches, mosques, synagogues, and memorials are viewed in the context of contemporary architecture and religious practice.

    Featuring more than a dozen essays by a broad range of leading international architects, historians, and theologians, Constructing the Ineffable offers a fundamental exploration of defining and understanding contemporary sacred spaces. This thought-provoking book also invites readers to consider the powerful influence of religion on civic life and to discuss the role that design and construction play in religious buildings.

  • Cosima Wagner - The Lady of Bayreuth

    An enthralling new biography of the woman behind Bayreuth

    In this meticulously researched book, Oliver Hilmes paints a fascinating and revealing picture of the extraordinary Cosima Wagner--illegitimate daughter of Franz Liszt, wife of the conductor Hans von Bulow, then mistress and subsequently wife of Richard Wagner. After Wagner's death in 1883 Cosima played a crucial role in the promulgation and politicization of his works, assuming control of the Bayreuth Festival and transforming it into a shrine to German nationalism. The High Priestess of the Wagnerian cult, Cosima lived on for almost fifty years, crafting the image of Richard Wagner through her organizational ability and ideological tenacity.

    The first book to make use of the available documentation at Bayreuth, this biography explores the achievements of this remarkable and obsessive woman while illuminating a still-hidden chapter of European cultural history.

  • Venice from the Water - Architecture and Myth in an Early City

    The floating city of Venice has enchanted visitors for centuries with its maze of scenic canals. For this pioneering book, Daniel Savoy set out by boat to explore the built environment of these waterways, gaining new insights into the architectural history of this major early modern Italian center. By viewing the architecture and experience of the canals in relation to the production of Venetian civic mythology, the author found that the waterways of Venice and its lagoon were integral areas of the city's pre-modern urban space, and that their flanking buildings were constructed in an intimate dialogue with the water's visual, spatial, and metaphorical properties.

    Enhancing the natural wonder of their aquatic setting, the builders of Venice used illusory aesthetic and scenographic practices to create waterfront buildings that appear to float, blend into the water, and glide into view around bends in the canals--transporting visitors into a seemingly otherworldly realm. This book's striking photographs of Venice, as seen from its waterways, will likewise transport readers with breathtaking views of this captivating city.

  • The Life and Death of Buildings - On Photography and Time

    Buildings inhabit and symbolize time, giving form to history and making public space an index of the past. Photographs are made of time; they are literally projections of past states of their subjects. This visually striking meditation on architecture in photography, indirectly marking the tenth anniversary of 9/11, explores the intersection between these two ways of embodying the past, by contemplating photographs of buildings as simultaneously the agents, vehicles and cargo of social memory. 'The Life and Death of Buildings' features images by such renowned photographers as Edouard-Denis Baldus, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Laura Gilpin, Lewis W. Hine, and William Henry Fox Talbot alongside those by amateurs, architects, propagandists and even insurance adjusters. Rather than examine these photographers' aims in isolation, the author considers how their images reflect and inflect the passage of time. Much as a building's shifting function and circumstances substantially alter its significance, a photograph studied in the context of its subsequent history grows layers of meaning to which its maker had no access.

  • Women of Abstract Expressionism

    A long-awaited survey of female Abstract Expressionist artists revealing the richness and lasting influence of their work

    The artists Jay DeFeo, Helen Frankenthaler, Grace Hartigan, Elaine de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, and many other women played major roles in the development of Abstract Expressionism, which flourished in New York and San Francisco in the 1940s and 1950s and has been recognized as the first fully American modern art movement. Though the contributions of these women were central to American art of the twentieth century, their work has not received the same critical attention as that of their male counterparts.

    Women of Abstract Expressionism is a long-overdue survey. Lavishly illustrated with full-color plates emphasizing the expressive freedom of direct gesture and process at the core of the movement, this book features biographies of more than forty artists, offering insight into their lives and work. Essays by noted scholars explore the techniques, concerns, and legacies of women in Abstract Expressionism, shedding light on their unique experiences. This groundbreaking book reveals the richness of the careers of these important artists and offers keen new reflections on their work and the movement as a whole.

  • Moral Teachings of Islam - Prophetic Traditions from al-Adam al-Mufrad by Imam al-Bukhari

    While al-Bukhari's original text runs to many hundred of pages, forming several volumes, Abdul Ali Hamid selected those teachings that have relevance and appeal to today's readership, not only to Muslims, but to all who seek to know more of the essence of Islamic life and teachings.

  • Jasper Johns - Seeing with the Mind′s Eye

    An eloquent, accessible survey of the work of the iconic American artist

    For more than sixty years, Jasper Johns has found new ways to explore how art creates meaning in the mind's eye. His most celebrated paintings from the 1950s and 1960s, with their bold colors, popular imagery, and sculptural elements, had an enormous impact on the development of pop, minimalism, and conceptual art. Johns is undoubtedly one of the most significant artists of the 20th century, and his work has inspired some of the field's most incisive critical thinking and writing.

    At eighty-two, Johns is still active, as are his critics and observers. Jasper Johns: Seeing with the Mind's Eye brings together established and younger scholars with the aim of exposing a new generation to the variety of critical approaches to this contemporary master. Contributions range from historical to critical and poetic and, unlike most large surveys, take a close, in-depth look at specific works of art and series, including paintings, drawings, graphics, sculptural pieces, and illustrated books from all periods of Johns's career.

  • Angels, Demons and Savages - Pollock, Ossorio, Dubuffet

    The artistic relationships among Jackson Pollock (1912-1956), Alfonso Ossorio (1916-1990), and Jean Dubuffet (1901-1985) strongly influenced the development of postwar art. Ossorio, the central figure in the trio, was an early champion of Pollock and the close friend of Dubuffet, whose radically anticultural Art Brut collection was prominently displayed at Ossorio's Hamptons estate. Dubuffet's admiration for Ossorio is evident in his 1951 essay on the artist, published here for the first time in English. Angels, Demons, and Savages reveals previously unrecognized technical and thematic affinities in the artists' work, from Dubuffet's "raw," unconventional style to Ossorio's use of Christian iconography and grotesque elements to Pollock's emphasis on medium and gestural force. Complete with two original essays and a conservation study, this groundbreaking catalogue shows how the three artists shaped the aesthetic on both sides of the Atlantic through their exchange of ideas and techniques.

  • Pacific Alliance - Reviving U.S.-Japan Relations

    Despite the enduring importance of the U.S.-Japan security alliance, the broader relationship between the two countries is today beset by sobering new difficulties. In this comprehensive comparative analysis of the transpacific alliance and its political, economic, and social foundations, Kent E. Calder, a leading Japan specialist, asserts that bilateral relations between the two countries are dangerously eroding as both seek broader options in a globally oriented world. Calder documents the quiet erosion of America's multidimensional ties with Japan as China rises, generations change, and new forces arise in both American and Japanese politics. He then assesses consequences for a twenty-first-century military alliance with formidable coordination requirements, explores alternative foreign paradigms for dealing with the United States, adopted by Britain, Germany, and China, and offers prescriptions for restoring U.S.-Japan relations to vitality once again.

  • Design: The Invention of Desire

    A compelling defense for the importance of design and how it shapes our behavior, our emotions, and our lives

    Design has always prided itself on being relevant to the world it serves, but interest in design was once limited to a small community of design professionals. Today, books on "design thinking" are best sellers, and computer and Web-based tools have expanded the definition of who practices design. Looking at objects, letterforms, experiences, and even theatrical performances, award-winning author Jessica Helfand asserts that understanding design's purpose is more crucial than ever. Design is meaningful not because it is pretty but because it is an intrinsically humanist discipline, tethered to the very core of why we exist. For example, as designers collaborate with developing nations on everything from more affordable lawn mowers to cleaner drinking water, they must take into consideration the full range of a given community's complex social needs. Advancing a conversation that is unfolding around the globe, Helfand offers an eye-opening look at how designed things make us feel as well as how--and why--they motivate our behavior.

  • Multitude, Solitude - The Photographs of Dave Heath

    The work of American photographer Dave Heath (b. 1931) stuns with its emotional potency. Exploring themes of loneliness and alienation in modern society, Heath's photographs depict strangers riding the train, watching a Thanksgiving parade, staring pensively at their dining room table, or kissing on the side of a street. Entirely self-taught, Heath stretches the boundaries of the medium and explores the potential of the photo-narrative--through handmade book maquettes, innovative multimedia slide presentations, and other photographic experimentations.
    This is the first comprehensive survey of Heath's deeply personal work, focusing on his astounding contributions to black-and-white photography. These images span the first 20 years of his career, 1949 to 1969, and many of them are previously unpublished. Filling a major gap in scholarship, the catalogue surveys the most groundbreaking facets of Heath's creative work and highlights its historical importance. Heath's art is ripe for rediscovery, and this book reaffirms his status as a key figure in 20th-century American photography.

  • Advocacy - Championing Ideas and Influencing Others

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    Lots of people have good ideas, but very few are ever enacted. What steps can you take to ensure that your own good ideas are realized?

    When a group of people gather together to generate ideas for solving a problem or achieving a goal, sometimes the best ideas are passed over. Worse, a problematic suggestion with far less likelihood of success may be selected instead. Why would a group dismiss an option that would be more effective? Leadership and communications expert John Daly has a straightforward answer: it wasn't sold to them as well. If the best idea is yours, how can you increase the chances that it gains the support of the group? In Advocacy: Championing Ideas and Influencing Others, Daly explains in full detail how to transform ideas into practice.

    To be successful, leaders in every type of organization must find practical and action-oriented ways to market their ideas and achieve buy-in from the members of the group. Daly offers a comprehensive action guide that explains how to shape opinion, inspire action, and achieve results. Drawing on current research in the fields of persuasion, power relations, and behavior change, he discusses the complex factors involved in selling an idea--the context of the communication, the type of message being promoted, the nature and interests of the audience, the emotional tenor of the issues at stake, and much more. For the businessperson, politician, or any other member of a group who seeks the satisfaction of having his or her own idea take shape and become reality, this book is an essential guide.

  • From Assyria to Iberia - Crossing Continents at the Dawn of the Classical Age

    A sweeping survey of objects from one of the richest artistic periods in history

    This comprehensive book explores the spectacular art of the first millennium B.C. from the Near East to Western Europe. This was the world of Odysseus, in which trade proliferated with Phoenician merchants; of King Midas, whose tomb was adorned with treasures; and of the Bible, whose stories are illuminated by recent artistic and archeological discoveries. It was also a time of rich cultural exchange across the Mediterranean and Near East as diverse populations interacted through trade, travel, and migration.

    Assyria to Iberia showcases masterpieces that reflect the cultural encounters of this era. Stunning details convey the beauty and significance of more than 300 objects drawn from collections around the globe. These objects include carved reliefs from the majestic palaces of ancient Assyria, Phoenician fine bronze metalwork and carved ivories, and luxurious jewelry. Texts by over 80 international scholars provide a compelling picture of this fascinating period, one that is essential to understanding the origins of Western culture and art.

  • Irrational Judgments - Eva Hesse, Sol LeWitt, and 1960s New York

    An intimate study of the friendship and creative dialogue between two artists, offering an in-depth understanding of their work and the upheavals of 1960s New York

    Irrational Judgments examines the close friendship and significant exchange of ideas between Eva Hesse (1936-1970) and Sol LeWitt (1928-2007) in New York City during the 1960s. Taking its title from LeWitt's statement "Irrational judgments lead to new experience," this book examines the breakthroughs of the artists' intertwined careers, offering a new understanding of minimal, post-minimal, and conceptual art amid the era's political and social upheavals.

    Kirsten Swenson offers the first in-depth discussion of the early critical developments of each artist: LeWitt's turn from commercial design to fine art, and Hesse's move from expressionist painting to reliefs and sculpture. Bringing together a wealth of documents, interviews, and images--many published here for the first time--this handsome publication presents an insightful account of the artists' influence on and support for each other's pursuit of an experimental practice. Swenson's analysis expands our understanding of the artists' ideas, the importance of their work, and, more broadly, the relationship of the 1960s New York art world to gender politics, the Vietnam War, and the city itself.

  • Why Nudge - The Politics of Libertarian Paternalism

    The bestselling author of Simpler offers a powerful, provocative, and convincing argument for protecting people from their own mistakes

    Based on a series of pathbreaking lectures given at Yale University in 2012, this powerful, thought-provoking work by national best-selling author Cass R. Sunstein combines legal theory with behavioral economics to make a fresh argument about the legitimate scope of government, bearing on obesity, smoking, distracted driving, health care, food safety, and other highly volatile, high-profile public issues. Behavioral economists have established that people often make decisions that run counter to their best interests--producing what Sunstein describes as "behavioral market failures." Sometimes we disregard the long term; sometimes we are unrealistically optimistic; sometimes we do not see what is in front of us. With this evidence in mind, Sunstein argues for a new form of paternalism, one that protects people against serious errors but also recognizes the risk of government overreaching and usually preserves freedom of choice.

    Against those who reject paternalism of any kind, Sunstein shows that "choice architecture"--government-imposed structures that affect our choices--is inevitable, and hence that a form of paternalism cannot be avoided. He urges that there are profoundly moral reasons to ensure that choice architecture is helpful rather than harmful--and that it makes people's lives better and longer.

  • History of Design - Decorative Arts and Material Culture, 1400-2000

    A survey of spectacular breadth, covering the history of decorative arts and design worldwide over the past six hundred years

    Spanning six centuries of global design, this far-reaching survey is the first to offer an account of the vast history of decorative arts and design produced in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Islamic world, from 1400 to the present. Meticulously documented and lavishly illustrated, the volume covers interiors, furniture, textiles and dress, glass, graphics, metalwork, ceramics, exhibitions, product design, landscape and garden design, and theater and film design. Divided into four chronological sections, each of which is subdivided geographically, the authors elucidate the evolution of style, form, materials, and techniques, and address vital issues such as gender, race, patronage, cultural appropriation, continuity versus innovation, and high versus low culture.

    Leading authorities in design history and decorative arts studies present hundreds of objects in their contemporary contexts, demonstrating the overwhelming extent to which the applied arts have enriched customs, ceremony, and daily life worldwide over the past six hundred years. This ambitious, landmark publication is essential reading, contributing a definitive classic to the existing scholarship on design, decorative arts, and material culture, while also introducing these subjects to new readers in a comprehensive, erudite book with widespread appeal.

  • Joseph Brodsky - A Literary Life

    An intimate, penetrating study of Joseph Brodsky's life and work, written by his lifelong friend, the eminent Russian literary scholar Lev Loseff

    The work of Joseph Brodsky (1940-1996), one of Russia's great modern poets, has been the subject of much study and debate. His life, too, is the stuff of legend, from his survival of the siege of Leningrad in early childhood to his expulsion from the Soviet Union and his achievements as a Nobel Prize winner and America's poet laureate.

    In this penetrating biography, Brodsky's life and work are illuminated by his great friend, the late poet and literary scholar Lev Loseff. Drawing on a wide range of source materials, some previously unpublished, and extensive interviews with writers and critics, Loseff carefully reconstructs Brodsky's personal history while offering deft and sensitive commentary on the philosophical, religious, and mythological sources that influenced the poet's work. Published to great acclaim in Russia and now available in English for the first time, this is literary biography of the first order, and sets the groundwork for any books on Brodsky that might follow.

  • Navigating the West - George Caleb Bingham and the River

    A new look at George Caleb Bingham's iconic river paintings and his creative process in making them

    George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879) moved to Missouri as a child and began painting the scenes of Missouri life for which he is now famous in the 1840s. Navigating the West explores how Bingham's iconic river paintings reveal the cultural and economic significance of the massive Mississippi and Missouri waterways to mid-19th-century society. Focusing on the artist's working methods and preparatory drawings, the book also explores Bingham's representations of people and places and situates these images in a dialogue with other contemporary depictions of the region. Of particular note are two landmark essays investigating Bingham's creative process through comparisons of infrared images of 17 of his paintings with both his preparatory drawings and the completed works, casting new light on his previously understudied process. Technical analysis of the artist's lauded masterpiece, Fur Traders Descending the Missouri, reveals Bingham's considerable revisions to the painting. In the concluding essay, the 20th-century revival of the artist's work is discussed within the context of American Regionalism and in light of a shifting sequence of narratives about the nation's past and future.

  • Barnett Newman - The Late Work 1965 1970

    An enlightening study of Barnett Newman's last works, based on a decade of exhaustive research

    The work of Barnett Newman (1905-1970) has come to define the spiritual aspirations and material innovations of American painting in the mid-20th century. Best known for his zip paintings--in which thin vertical lines rise through large, bold planes of color--Newman's work was an abrupt departure from his contemporaries' gestural abstraction, yet anticipated Color Field painting.

    During the last five years of his life, Newman worked primarily in acrylic rather than oil paint, used increasingly vibrant colors, and experimented with shaped canvases. When he died at the age of 65, he left a group of works hanging in his studio, some deemed unfinished. Centered on three of these works, this book builds upon ten years of exhaustive technical research to provide a rare glimpse of Newman's relatively mysterious artistic process. The first scholarly publication devoted to the last years of Newman's oeuvre, it features more than 20 paintings from this period and earlier. The authors present eye-opening analysis of these unfinished works as well as rich insight into Newman's full body of work. This striking volume also includes photographic close-ups and scientific imaging that reveal previously unknown aspects of Newman's mediums and techniques.

  • Like a Straw Bird it Follows Me - And other Poems

    A stirring collection of recent work by a leading poet of the Arab world, superbly translated for English-language readers

    In this inspired translation of Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me, Ghassan Zaqtan's tenth and most recent poetry collection, along with selected earlier poems, Fady Joudah brings to English-language readers the best work by one of the most important and original Palestinian poets of our time. With these poems Zaqtan enters new terrain, illuminating the vision of what Arabic poetry in general and Palestinian poetry in particular are capable of. Departing from the lush aesthetics of such celebrated predecessors as Mahmoud Darwish and Adonis, Zaqtan's daily, delicate narrative, whirling catalogues, and at times austere aesthetics represent a new trajectory, a significant leap for young Arabic poets today.

    In his preface to the volume, Joudah analyzes and explores the poet's body of work. "Ghassan Zaqtan's poems, in their constant unfolding," Joudah writes, "invite us to enter them, exit them, map and unmap them, code and decode them, fill them up and empty them, with the living and nonliving, the animate and inanimate, toward a true freedom."

  • Ireland and the Picturesque - Design, Landscape Painting, and Tourism, 1700-1840

    That Ireland is picturesque is a well-worn cliche, but little is understood of how this perception was created, painted, and manipulated during the long 18th century. This book positions Ireland at the core of the picturesque's development and argues for a far greater degree of Irish influence on the course of European landscape theory and design. Positioned off-axis from the greater force-field, and off-shore from mainland Europe and America, where better to cultivate the oblique perspective? This book charts the creation of picturesque Ireland, while exploring in detail the role and reach of landscape painting in the planning, publishing, landscaping and design of Ireland's historic landscapes, towns, and tourist routes. Thus it is also a history of the physical shaping of Ireland as a tourist destination, one of the earliest, most calculated, and most successful in the world.

  • Isaac Mizrahi

    A landmark survey of the work of Isaac Mizrahi, a trailblazing and influential American fashion designer, artist, and entrepreneur

    Beginning with Isaac Mizrahi's first fashion collection, which debuted to critical acclaim in 1986, and running though the present day, this stylish, lavishly illustrated book presents his signature couture collections. Mizrahi's exuberant couture style is classic American, inventively reimagined. He pioneered the concept of "high/low" in fashion, and was the first high-end fashion designer to create an accessibly priced mass-market line. Mizrahi approached other complex issues through his designs, as well--mixing questions of beauty and taste with those of race, religion, class, and politics.

    Although Mizrahi (b. 1961) is best known for his clothing, his work in theater, film, and television is also explored. The result is a spirited discourse on high versus low, modern glamour, and contemporary culture. Three essayists discuss Mizrahi's place in fashion history, his close connection to contemporary art, and the performative nature of his designs. New photography brings Mizrahi's fashions to life, and an interview with the artist offers an intimate perspective on his kaleidoscopic work in diverse media.

  • The Anatomy of Influence - Literature as a Way of Life

    Our most revered critic returns to his signature theme

    "Literary criticism, as I attempt to practice it," writes Harold Bloom in The Anatomy of Influence, "is in the first place literary, that is to say, personal and passionate."

    For more than half a century, Bloom has shared his profound knowledge of the written word with students and readers. In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads us through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years. The result is "a critical self-portrait," a sustained meditation on a life lived with and through the great works of the Western canon: Why has influence been my lifelong obsessive concern? Why have certain writers found me and not others? What is the end of a literary life?

    Featuring extended analyses of Bloom's most cherished poets--Shakespeare, Whitman, and Crane--as well as inspired appreciations of Emerson, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Ashbery, and others, The Anatomy of Influence adapts Bloom's classic work The Anxiety of Influence to show us what great literature is, how it comes to be, and why it matters. Each chapter maps startling new literary connections that suddenly seem inevitable once Bloom has shown us how to listen and to read. A fierce and intimate appreciation of the art of literature on a scale that the author will not again attempt, TheAnatomy of Influence follows the sublime works it studies, inspiring the reader with a sense of something ever more about to be.

  • Cheshire - The Buildings of England

    This is a comprehensive guide to the buildings of Cheshire in all their variety, from Pennine villages to coastal plains and seaside resorts. Chester, the regional capital and cathedral city, is famous for its Roman walls and black-and-white timber architecture, its noble Neoclassical monuments, and its unique medieval shopping 'rows' with their upper walkways. But Cheshire is also a major industrial county, with spectacular and internationally significant mills and canal structures. Specialist settlements include the famous railway borough of Crewe, the salt towns of Nantwich, Northwich and Middlewich, and Lord Leverhulme's celebrated garden suburb at Port Sunlight.

  • A Mother′s Work - How Feminism, the Market and Policy Shape Family Life

    A fresh perspective on the struggle to balance work and family life

    The question of how best to combine work and family life has led to lively debates in recent years. Both a lifestyle and a policy issue, it has been addressed psychologically, socially, and economically, and conclusions have been hotly contested. But as Neil Gilbert shows in this penetrating and provocative book, we haven't looked closely enough at how and why these questions are framed, or who benefits from the proposed answers.

    A Mother's Work takes a hard look at the unprecedented rise in childlessness, along with the outsourcing of family care and household production, which have helped to alter family life since the 1960s. It challenges the conventional view on how to balance motherhood and employment, and examines how the choices women make are influenced by the culture of capitalism, feminist expectations, and the social policies of the welfare state. Gilbert argues that while the market ignores the essential value of a mother's work, prevailing norms about the social benefits of work have been overvalued by elites whose opportunities and circumstances little resemble those of most working- and middle-class mothers. And the policies that have been crafted too often seem friendlier to the market than to the family. Gilbert ends his discussion by looking at the issue internationally, and he makes the case for reframing the debate to include a wider range of social values and public benefits that present more options for managing work and family responsibilities.

  • John Marin′s Watercolors - A Medium for Modernism

    American modernist John Marin (1870-1953) worked prolifically in watercolour, etching, and oil during a career that spanned more than 50 years. It was the medium of watercolour, however, that encouraged him in his development of a bold, original style that is both contemporary and authentically American. Marins improvisational approach to colour, paint handling, perspective and movement situated him as a leading figure in modern art and helped influence the Abstract Expressionist movement. John Marins Watercolors is the first book to present the Art Institute of Chicagos impressive collection of his works in its entirety, ranging from early images rooted in traditional practice to more experimental compositions. It explores the artists working method, his modernist vision as it developed through etching and into watercolour, and his intuitive investigation of the inherent properties of his watercolour to craft a new, avant-garde methodology. The works are organized chronologically and grouped according to the sites where they were painted, including New York City, France and the Tyrol, the Maine coastline, and the New Mexico desert.

  • Gray Collection - Seven Centuries of Art

    One of Americas foremost art dealers, Richard Gray, and his wife, art historian Mary L. Gray, have amassed an unparalleled collection of paintings, drawings, and sculpture representing seven hundred years and featuring more than 115 dynamic and important pieces. Showcased in this stunning catalogue are Renaissance- and Baroque-era treasures, 19th-century works by masters such as Delacroix, Degas, and Seurat, and stellar examples by acclaimed 20th-century artists including Picasso, Matisse, and Miro. Suzanne Folds McCullagh presents a brief introduction to the collection, followed by Lawrence Weschlers interview with Richard and Mary L. Gray and entries by more than 60 experts on the various pieces of art. French drawings scholar Francois Borne offers an appreciation of the keen visual sensibilities the couple has brought to the formation of their outstanding collection.

  • Paula Modersohn-Becker - The First Modern Woman Artist

    Considered one of the most important of the early German modernists, the painter Paula Modersoln-Becker (1876-1907) challenged traditional representations of the female body in art. She was the first modern woman artist to paint herself nude, as well as mothers and children nude. She also created the first self-portrait while pregnant in the history of art. Modersohn-Becker painted the life she was living as a woman and artist and led the way for generations of women artists. Tragically, her life and career were cut short at age thirty-one, following complications from childbirth. Diane Radycki examines the artist's fascinating biography, including her friendships with poet Rainer Maria Rilke and sculptor Clara Westhoff; her personal anguish, including years in an unconsummated marriage, a disappointing affair, and irresolution about motherhood. Radycki also details the genres of Modersohn-Becker's work: figure (especially nudes), still life, and landscape; and the reception of her work following her death. This new book is an authoritative source on Modersohn-Becker, who Radycki convincingly portrays as the first significant woman artist in the history of modernism.

  • Roman Sarcophagi in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    (This title was originally published in 1978/79.)"

  • French Art Deco

    An essential survey of French Art Deco, with alluring photographs that render it an art object in its own right

    The French Art Deco style, which encapsulates the complex, modern sensibilities of the early 20th century, is epitomized by the French works exhibited at the Paris 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriales. The exquisite craftsmanship and artistry of the dazzling works displayed spoke to a sophisticated modernity, yet they were rooted in tradition. Interest in Art Deco has not only endured to the present day, but has grown steadily, and the style is now better known and more collected than ever before.

    This informative publication provides an introduction to the historical backdrop for the Art Deco movement and outlines the most salient aspects of the aesthetic. Sumptuous, all-new photography features over one hundred masterpieces, created by forty-five artists, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art's renowned collection. Each chapter focuses on a specific designer, and includes a biography and discussions of the objects, enlivened by generous quotes from contemporary writings. As one of the only English volumes devoted to French Art Deco, this is a significant contribution to the study and appreciation of the style.

  • Richard Hawkins - Third Man

    This stunning book offers an important mid-career retrospective of the work of American artist Richard Hawkins (born 1961), whose paintings, collages, and mixed-media pieces are making a crucial contribution to the contemporary art scene. Colour plates present approximately 80 of Hawkinss works, representing each stage of his career and including pieces never before published. Based in Los Angeles, Hawkins addresses numerous contemporary issues in his art, especially those related to gender and identity and their connections to classical antiquity. The authors of the catalogue provide informative essays on aspects of Hawkinss work, the development of his vision, and his unique place in the contemporary art world.

  • Kosta Alex

    The Greek-American artist Kosta Alex (1925-2005) initially trained in figure sculpture in Manhattan. In 1947 he moved to Paris, where he mingled with and exhibited alongside the avant-garde artists of his day. His interest in the flattening of forms led him to create his first series of decoupage-collages in about 1950. Like many other artists of the time, he was drawn to using humble, utilitarian materials such as corrugated cardboard, packaging, newspapers, magazines, wallpaper, timetables, lists, maps and other scraps culled from daily urban life. He integrated these elements into his art in an often poetic and humorous manner, using screws, nuts, staples, rope, string, and glue to connect them into a cohesive whole. Alex also drew inspiration from classical sculpture, primitive art, and Islamic art, and employed repetitive themes and rhythmic arrangements in his compositions. In the late 1960s and early 1970s he produced groundbreaking collage-reliefs in expanded polystyrene, which Man Ray praised for breaking 'the two-dimensional barrier'. Handsomely illustrated, 'Kosta Alex' is the first monograph on this intriguing artist.

  • Fashion Plates - 150 Years of Style

    A sumptuously illustrated, encyclopedic chronicle of fashion and its trends, from the 18th to the early 20th century

    Prior to the invention of photography, European and American magazines used colorful prints to depict the latest fashion trends. These illustrations, known as "fashion plates," conveyed the cutting-edge styles embraced by the fashion-conscious elite and proved inspirational to the upwardly mobile. This lavishly illustrated book provides a comprehensive survey of 200 color plates from publications dating from 1778 to the early 20th century, accompanied by authoritative and fascinating texts. Organized chronologically and featuring both men's and women's garments, these lively and colorful vignettes not only are beautiful, but also deftly illustrate the evolution of fashion over time.

  • Richard Diebenkorn - The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966

    In the 1950s American painter Richard Diebenkorn (1922 1993) took a dramatic turn away from his early work, exploring new vocabularies of both abstract and representational styles, which would come to be known as the artist s Berkeley period. This era has long been recognized as one of the most interesting chapters in postwar American art, yielding many of Diebenkorn s best-known works.

    "Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953 1966" examines Diebenkorn s process and output during this decisive period. Three original essays explore the artist s evolving conceptions of abstraction and representation, emphasizing the interrelationships between the abstract paintings and drawings and related landscapes, figurative works, and still lifes, as well as Diebenkorn s ongoing interest in aerial views.

    Featuring several significant works that have rarely been on view, as well as previously unpublished photographs from the Diebenkorn archives, this important publication is the first comprehensive look at this critical period."

  • The Courage to be 3e

    Originally published more than fifty years ago, The Courage to Be has become a classic of twentieth-century religious and philosophical thought. The great Christian existentialist thinker Paul Tillich describes the dilemma of modern man and points a way to the conquest of the problem of anxiety. This edition includes a new introduction by Harvey Cox that situates the book within the theological conversation into which it first appeared and conveys its continued relevance in the current century. "The brilliance, the wealth of illustration, and the aptness of personal application . . . make the reading of these chapters an exciting experience."--W. Norman Pittenger, New York Times Book Review "A lucid and arresting book."--Frances Witherspoon, New York Herald Tribune "Clear, uncluttered thinking and lucid writing mark Mr. Tillich's study as a distinguished and readable one."--American Scholar Selected as one of the Books of the Century by the New York Public Library

  • Talent wants to be Free - Why We Should Learn to Love Leaks, Raids, and Free Riding

    A compelling argument for a new set of attitudes toward human capital to sharpen our competitive edge and to fuel the creative sparks in any environment

    This timely book challenges conventional business wisdom about competition, secrecy, motivation, and creativity. Orly Lobel, an internationally acclaimed expert in the law and economics of human capital, warns that a set of counterproductive mentalities are stifling innovation in many regions and companies. Lobel asks how innovators, entrepreneurs, research teams, and every one of us who experiences the occasional spark of creativity can triumph in today's innovation ecosystems. In every industry and every market, battles to recruit, retain, train, energize, and motivate the best people are fierce. From Facebook to Google, Coca-Cola to Intel, JetBlue to Mattel, Lobel uncovers specific factors that produce winners or losers in the talent wars. Combining original behavioral experiments with sharp observations of contemporary battles over ideas, secrets, and skill, Lobel identifies motivation, relationships, and mobility as the most important ingredients for successful innovation. Yet many companies embrace a control mentality--relying more on patents, copyright, branding, espionage, and aggressive restrictions of their own talent and secrets than on creative energies that are waiting to be unleashed. Lobel presents a set of positive changes in corporate strategies, industry norms, regional policies, and national laws that will incentivize talent flow, creativity, and growth. This vital and exciting reading reveals why everyone wins when talent is set free.

  • The Cobbe Cabinet of Curiosities - An Anglo-Irish Countryhouse Museum

    This beautiful book reveals the fascinating history of the cabinet of curiosities belonging to the Cobbe family, who created it around 1750 at Newbridge House (Co. Dublin) and developed it over the following century. Now housed at Hatchlands Park, Surrey, it has changed so little since 1850 that it offers a time-capsule - virtually unique in its survival - of a private cabinet from the period of the Enlightenment, a type of collection that would once have been common in country houses throughout Britain but which has been all but lost to view. The enormous range of surviving objects and specimens (including ethnographic and other man-made specimens, antiquities, natural history, geology) is illustrated by specially commissioned photographs of the collection and has been catalogued by scholars in the respective fields who discuss also the place of the cabinet of curiosities in Enlightenment society, the history of the Cobbe family and the impact of its members on the nature and extent of the cabinet, as well as the uniquely surviving display cabinets constructed in the 1780s, in which the collection continues to be displayed.

  • Abelardo Morell - The Universe Next Door

    A riveting retrospective of the imaginative photographs created by contemporary artist Abelardo Morell Over the past twenty-five years, Abelardo Morell (b. 1948) has earned international praise for his images that use the language of photography to explore visual surprise and wonder. Born in Havana, Cuba, Morell came to the United States as a teenager in 1962 and later studied photography, earning an MFA from Yale University. He gained attention for intimate, black-and-white pictures of domestic objects from a child's point of view, inspired by the birth of his son in 1986, as well as images in which he turns a room into a giant camera obscura, projecting exterior views onto interior spaces; and photographs of books that revel in their sensory materiality. In more recent years, he has turned to color, exploring the camera obscura with a painterly delight and innovating a tent camera that projects outdoor scenes onto a textured ground. Across his career, Morell has approached photography with remarkable wit and creativity, examining everyday objects with childlike curiosity. The first in-depth treatment in fifteen years, this handsome and important book examines Morell's career to the present day, including his earlier works in black-and-white and never before published color photographs from the past decade. An essay by Elizabeth Siegel, along with a recent interview with the artist and an illustrated chronology of his life and works, offers a riveting portrait of this contemporary photographer and his ongoing artistic endeavors.

  • Princes and Painters in Mughal Delhi, 1707-1857

    Between the years 1707 and 1857, the cultural center of Delhi in North India was the locus of a dramatic shift of power with the decline of the Mughal Empire and the rise of the British Raj. This critical transitional period altered Indian culture, politics, and art, and brought unprecedented artistic innovation and experimentation. The artistic flowering of this time is evident in jewel-like portraits, miniature paintings, striking panoramas, and exquisite decorative arts crafted for Mughal emperors and European residents alike.

    Sumptuous color illustrations of such works illuminate the pages of this book, painting a vivid portrait of this important city and its art, artists, and patrons. Masterworks by major Mughal artists, such as Nidha Mal and Ghulam Ali Khan, and works by non-Mughal artists demonstrate the dynamic interplay of artistic production at this time. This largely overlooked period is explored in thought-provoking essays by a panel of distinguished scholars of Indian art, history, and literature to present an engaging look at this dynamic artistic culture in the midst of rapid change.

  • Abstract Bodies - Sixties Sculpture in the Expanded Field of Gender

    Original and theoretically astute, Abstract Bodies is the first book to apply the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies to the discipline of art history. It recasts debates around abstraction and figuration in 1960s art through a discussion of gender's mutability and multiplicity. In that decade, sculpture purged representation and figuration but continued to explore the human as an implicit reference. Even as the statue and the figure were left behind, artists and critics asked how the human, and particularly gender and sexuality, related to abstract sculptural objects that refused the human form. This book examines abstract sculpture in the 1960s that came to propose unconventional and open accounts of bodies, persons, and genders. Drawing on transgender and queer theory, David J. Getsy offers innovative and archivally rich new interpretations of artworks by and critical writing about four major artists-Dan Flavin (1933-1996), Nancy Grossman (b. 1940), John Chamberlain (1927-2011), and David Smith (1906-1965). Abstract Bodies makes a case for abstraction as a resource in reconsidering gender's multiple capacities and offers an ambitious contribution to this burgeoning interdisciplinary field.

  • A Marginal Jew: Rethinking the Historical Jesus, - Probing the Authenticity of the Parables V5

    Since the late nineteenth century, New Testament scholars have operated on the belief that most, if not all, of the narrative parables in the Synoptic Gospels can be attributed to the historical Jesus. This book challenges that consensus and argues instead that only four parables--those of the Mustard Seed, the Evil Tenants, the Talents, and the Great Supper--can be attributed to the historical Jesus with fair certitude. In this eagerly anticipated fifth volume of A Marginal Jew, John Meier approaches this controversial subject with the same rigor and insight that garnered his earlier volumes praise from such publications as the New York Times and Christianity Today. This seminal volume pushes forward his masterful body of work in his ongoing quest for the historical Jesus.

  • Edward III

    A landmark biography of the charismatic king beloved of fourteenth-century England

    Edward III (1312-1377) was the most successful European ruler of his age. Reigning for over fifty years, he achieved spectacular military triumphs and overcame grave threats to his authority, from parliamentary revolt to the Black Death. Revered by his subjects as a chivalric dynamo, he initiated the Hundred Years' War and gloriously led his men into battle against the Scots and the French.

    In this illuminating biography, W. Mark Ormrod takes a deeper look at Edward to reveal the man beneath the military muscle. What emerges is Edward's clear sense of his duty to rebuild the prestige of the Crown, and through military gains and shifting diplomacy, to secure a legacy for posterity. New details of the splendor of Edward's court, lavish national celebrations, and innovative use of imagery establish the king's instinctive understanding of the bond between ruler and people. With fresh emphasis on how Edward's rule was affected by his family relationships--including his roles as traumatized son, loving husband, and dutiful father--Ormrod gives a valuable new dimension to our understanding of this remarkable warrior king.

  • The Steins Collect - Matisse, Picasso and the Parisian Avant-Garde

    A fascinating, in-depth exploration of the groundbreaking art collections of Gertrude Stein and her family

    As American expatriates living in Paris, the writer Gertrude Stein, her brothers Leo and Michael, and Michael's wife Sarah were absolutely pivotal in shaping the city's vibrant cultural life in the early 20th century. They hosted Saturday evening salons at which the brightest artists, writers, musicians, and collectors convened to discuss the latest developments. They aggressively promoted and collected emerging painters and sculptors, particularly their close friends Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. And along the way they developed unparalleled holdings in modernist work by such figures as Paul Cezanne, Juan Gris, Francis Picabia, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Lavishly produced and featuring more than 600 images, The Steins Collect is the first comprehensive exploration of the Steins' extraordinary collections and their enduring cultural influence.

    The book explores the Steins' impact on art-making and collecting practices in Europe and the United States; the intense sibling rivalries that developed around key artists and ideas; the roots of Leo's aesthetic theories in the thought of William James and Bernard Berenson; Sarah and Michael's role in founding the Academie Matisse; Gertrude's complex relationship with Picasso and their artistic influence on each other; Le Corbusier's radical villa design for the family; and much more. The Steins Collect not only reveals the artistic prescience of this innovative family and their important patronage, but also traces how they created a new international standard of taste for modern art.

  • Gulag Voices

    A unique anthology of Gulag memoirs, edited and annotated by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Applebaum

    Anne Applebaum wields her considerable knowledge of a dark chapter in human history and presents a collection of the writings of survivors of the Gulag, the Soviet concentration camps. Although the opening of the Soviet archives to scholars has made it possible to write the history of this notorious concentration camp system, documents tell only one side of the story. Gulag Voices now fills in the other half.

    The backgrounds of the writers reflect the extraordinary diversity of the Gulag itself. Here are the personal stories of such figures as Dmitri Likhachev, a renowned literary scholar; Anatoly Marchenko, the son of illiterate laborers; and Alexander Dolgun, an American citizen. These remembrances--many of them appearing in English for the first time, each chosen for both literary and historical value--collectively spotlight the strange moral universe of the camps, as well as the relationships that prisoners had with one another, with their guards, and with professional criminals who lived beside them.

    A vital addition to the literature of this era, annotated for a generation that no longer remembers the Soviet Union, Gulag Voices will inform, interest, and inspire, offering a source for reflection on human nature itself.

  • Mourning Lincoln

    How did individual Americans respond to the shock of President Lincoln's assassination? Diaries, letters, and intimate writings reveal a complicated, untold story.

    The news of Abraham Lincoln's assassination on April 15, 1865, just days after Confederate surrender, astounded the war-weary nation. Massive crowds turned out for services and ceremonies. Countless expressions of grief and dismay were printed in newspapers and preached in sermons. Public responses to the assassination have been well chronicled, but this book is the first to delve into the personal and intimate responses of everyday people--northerners and southerners, soldiers and civilians, black people and white, men and women, rich and poor.

    Through deep and thoughtful exploration of diaries, letters, and other personal writings penned during the spring and summer of 1865, Martha Hodes, one of our finest historians, captures the full range of reactions to the president's death--far more diverse than public expressions would suggest. She tells a story of shock, glee, sorrow, anger, blame, and fear. "'Tis the saddest day in our history," wrote a mournful man. It was "an electric shock to my soul," wrote a woman who had escaped from slavery. "Glorious News!" a Lincoln enemy exulted. "Old Lincoln is dead, and I will kill the goddamned Negroes now," an angry white southerner ranted. For the black soldiers of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts, it was all "too overwhelming, too lamentable, too distressing" to absorb.

    There are many surprises in the story Hodes tells, not least the way in which even those utterly devastated by Lincoln's demise easily interrupted their mourning rituals to attend to the most mundane aspects of everyday life. There is also the unexpected and unabated virulence of Lincoln's northern critics, and the way Confederates simultaneously celebrated Lincoln's death and instantly--on the very day he died--cast him as a fallen friend to the defeated white South.

    Hodes brings to life a key moment of national uncertainty and confusion, when competing visions of America's future proved irreconcilable and hopes for racial justice in the aftermath of the Civil War slipped from the nation's grasp. Hodes masterfully brings the tragedy of Lincoln's assassination alive in human terms--terms that continue to stagger and rivet us one hundred and fifty years after the event they so strikingly describe.

  • The Atmosphere of Heaven - The Unnatural Experiments of Dr Beddoes and His Sons of Genius

    At the Pneumatic Institution in Bristol, founded in the closing years of the eighteenth century, dramatic experiments with gases precipitated not only a revolution in scientific medicine but also in the history of ideas. Guided by the energy of maverick doctor Thomas Beddoes, the Institution was both laboratory and hospital - the first example of a modern medical research institution. But when its members discovered the mind-altering properties of nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, their experiments devolved into a pioneering exploration of consciousness with far-reaching and unforeseen effects. This riveting book is the first to tell the story of Dr. Beddoes and the brilliant circle who surrounded him: Erasmus Darwin, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Southey, who supported his ideas; James Watt, who designed and built his laboratory; Thomas Wedgwood, who funded it; and his dazzling young chemistry assistant, Humphry Davy, who identified nitrous oxide and tested it on himself, with spectacular results. Medical historian Mike Jay charts the chaotic rise and fall of the Institution in this fast-paced account, and reveals its crucial influence - on modern drug culture, attitudes toward objective and subjective knowledge, the development of anaesthetic surgery, and the birth of the Romantic movement.

  • The English Prize - The Capture of the Westmorland , An Episode of the Grand Tour

    Laden with works of art acquired by young British travelers on the Grand Tour in Italy, the British merchant ship Westmorland sailed from the Italian port of Livorno before being captured by French naval vessels and escorted to Malaga in southern Spain. The artistic treasures on board were purchased by King Carlos III of Spain, and the majority were deposited in the collections of the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. There they resided, unknown, until recent research, using original inventories that survive in the Academia's archives, identified the Westmorland's rich cargo.

    The English Prize reveals the gripping story of the ship's capture and the disposition of its artistic contents, which included Raphael Mengs's Perseus and Andromeda, Pompeo Batoni's portraits of Frances Bassett and Lord Lewisham, and watercolors by John Robert Cozens. This volume illuminates the cultural phenomenon of the Grand Tour and the young travelers who acquired the trove of books and art works on board the Westmorland but were never able to enjoy their purchases.

  • Bright Colors Falsely Seen - Synaesthesia and the Search for Transcendental Knowledge

    In a conversation with his physician, a nineteenth-century resident of Paris who lived near the railroad described sensations of brilliant color generated by the sounds of trains passing in the night. This patient-a synaesthete-experienced "color hearing" for letters, words, and most sounds. Synaesthesia, a phenomenon now known to science for over a century, is a rare form of perception in which one sense may respond to stimuli received by other senses. This fascinating book provides the first historical treatment of synaesthesia and a closely related mode of perception called eideticism. Kevin Dann discusses divergent views of synaesthesia and eideticism over the last hundred years and explores the controversies over the significance of these unusual modes of perception. Celebrated at the turn of the century as a uniquely creative form of consciousness, synaesthesia became embroiled in a debate between Romantics who championed it as a desirable harbinger of a new, more spiritual age, and positivists who denounced it as primitive and irrational. The author debunks Romantic notions of the transcendental nature of synaesthesia and shows that although novelist Vladimir Nabokov was a true synaesthete and eidetic, other individuals the Romantics considered synaesthetes were not. Drawing on studies of autism and hallucinogenic drugs, Dann offers new perspectives on synaesthesia and eideticism and how they relate to the evolution of human consciousness.

  • Alexandria - City of Memory

    A luminous portrait of the now-vanished cosmopolitan city and those who inhabited it during the first half of the 20th century

    This book is a literary, social, and political portrait of Alexandria at a high point of its history. Drawing on diaries, letters, and interviews, Michael Haag recovers the lost life of the city, its cosmopolitan inhabitants, and its literary characters.
    Located on the coast of Africa yet rich in historical associations with Western civilization, Alexandria was home to an exotic variety of people whose cosmopolitan families had long been rooted in the commerce and the culture of the entire Mediterranean world.
    Alexandria famously excited the imaginations of writers, and Haag folds intimate accounts of E. M. Forster, Greek poet Constantine Cavafy, and Lawrence Durrell into the story of its inhabitants. He recounts the city's experience of the two world wars and explores the communities that gave Alexandria its unique flavor: the Greek, the Italian, and the Jewish. The book deftly harnesses the sexual and emotional charge of cosmopolitan life in this extraordinary city, and highlights the social and political changes over the decades that finally led to Nasser's Egypt.

  • The Social Life of Coffee

    What induced the British to adopt foreign coffee-drinking customs in the seventeenth century? Why did an entirely new social institution, the coffeehouse, emerge as the primary place for consumption of this new drink? In this lively book, Brian Cowan locates the answers to these questions in the particularly British combination of curiosity, commerce, and civil society. Cowan provides the definitive account of the origins of coffee drinking and coffeehouse society, and in so doing he reshapes our understanding of the commercial and consumer revolutions in Britain during the long Stuart century.

    Britain's virtuosi, gentlemanly patrons of the arts and sciences, were profoundly interested in things strange and exotic. Cowan explores how such virtuosi spurred initial consumer interest in coffee and invented the social template for the first coffeehouses. As the coffeehouse evolved, rising to take a central role in British commercial and civil society, the virtuosi were also transformed by their own invention.

  • To Make a World - George Ault and 1940′s America

    An American painter usually associated with the Precisionist movement, George Copeland Ault (1891-1948) created works that provide a unique window onto the uncertainty and despair of the Second World War. Despite early commercial success in the 1920s, Ault eventually withdrew from both artistic and political worlds in 1937 and set up his studio in a tiny house in Woodstock, New York, where he produced evocative scenes of barns, telephone wires, and streetlights that utilize precise alignments and geometries to impose a symbolic order on a world in crisis.

    To Make a World is the first publication on Ault in more than two decades, and it features nearly twenty of Ault's paintings alongside those of his contemporaries, including Edward Hopper, Rockwell Kent, and Andrew Wyeth. Author Alexander Nemerov explains that despite Ault's remote location and reclusive lifestyle, his paintings represent his fear for the precarious state of the world and reflect an emotional response shared by many artists and the nation at large.

  • Analysis of the Under-Five Child

    Emotional problems in children age five to six or younger are too often misunderstood, misdiagnosed, or simply neglected. Even for those children who do receive attention, it is frequently inadequate. To assume, however, that prelatency children are too young to treat, particularly with psychoanalysis, is mistaken, the contributors to this book argue. They present detailed case studies of the psychoanalytic treatment of children as young as two years old, and they offer extended discussions of some of the issues raised by the treatment of prelatency children.

    This is the first book to deal exclusively with the psychoanalysis of small children. The contributors, well-known analysts and authorities in their field, examine the cases of eight prelatency children. The cases support the notion that psychoanalysis by a properly trained analyst can provide the most effective, rapid, and long-lasting treatment for young children. Early psychoanalysis can also avert the need for later treatment, when success is generally much more difficult to achieve. Psychoanalysts, psychologists, pediatricians, counselors, and others interested in the emotional well-being of young children will find in this deeply informed book a wealth of information on current theory and technique of analysis of preschool children.

  • Surge - My Journey with General David Patraeus and the Remaking of the Iraq War

    The first full insider account of the troop surge in Iraq, told by a member of General David Petraeus's personal staff

    Surge is an insider's view of the most decisive phase of the Iraq War. After exploring the dynamics of the war during its first three years, the book takes the reader on a journey to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where the controversial new U.S. Army and Marine Corps counterinsurgency doctrine was developed; to Washington, D.C., and the halls of the Pentagon, where the Joint Chiefs of Staff struggled to understand the conflict; to the streets of Baghdad, where soldiers worked to implement the surge and reenergize the flagging war effort before the Iraqi state splintered; and to the halls of Congress, where Ambassador Ryan Crocker and General David Petraeus testified in some of the most contentious hearings in recent memory.

    Using newly declassified documents, unpublished manuscripts, interviews, author notes, and published sources, Surge explains how President George W. Bush, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, Ambassador Crocker, General Petraeus, and other U.S. and Iraqi political and military leaders shaped the surge from the center of the maelstrom in Baghdad and Washington.

  • Restless Valley - Revolution, Murder and Intrigue in the Heart of Central Asia

    A reporter's vivid account of Central Asia's wild recent history--violent in the extreme and rife with characters both heroic and corrup

    It sounds like the stuff of a fiction thriller: two revolutions, a massacre of unarmed civilians, a civil war, a drug-smuggling highway, brazen corruption schemes, contract hits, and larger-than-life characters who may be villains . . . or heroes . . . or possibly both. Yet this book is not a work of fiction. It is instead a gripping, firsthand account of Central Asia's unfolding history from 2005 to the present.

    Philip Shishkin, a prize-winning journalist with extensive on-the-ground experience in the tumultuous region above Afghanistan's northern border, focuses mainly on Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. Both nations have struggled with the enormous challenges of post-Soviet independent statehood; both became entangled in America's Afghan campaign when U.S. military bases were established within their borders. At the same time, the region was developing into a key smuggling hub for Afghanistan's booming heroin trade. Through the eyes of local participants--the powerful and the powerless--Shishkin reconstructs how Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan have ricocheted between extreme repression and democratic strivings, how alliances with the United States and Russia have brought mixed blessings, and how Stalin's legacy of ethnic gerrymandering incites conflict even now.

  • A Field Guide to the Ants of New England

    This book is the first user-friendly regional guide devoted to ants--the "little things that run the world." Lavishly illustrated with more than 500 line drawings, 300-plus photographs, and regional distribution maps as composite illustrations for every species, this guide will introduce amateur and professional naturalists and biologists, teachers and students, and environmental managers and pest-control professionals to more than 140 ant species found in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada.

    The detailed drawings and species descriptions, together with the high-magnification photographs, will allow anyone to identify and learn about ants and their diversity, ecology, life histories, and beauty. In addition, the book includes sections on collecting ants, ant ecology and evolution, natural history, and patterns of geographic distribution and diversity to help readers gain a greater understanding and appreciation of ants.

  • The Bauhaus Group - Six Masters of Modernism

    Nicholas Fox Weber, for thirty-four years head of the Albers Foundation, spent many years with Anni and Josef Albers, the only husband-and-wife artistic pair at the Bauhaus (she was a textile artist; he was a professor and an artist, in glass, metal, wood, and photography). The Alberses told him their own stories and described life at the Bauhaus with their fellow artists and teachers, Walter Gropius, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, as well as with these figures' lesser-known wives and girlfriends.

    In this extraordinary group biography, Weber brilliantly brings to life the pioneering art school in Germany's Weimar and Dessau in the 1920s and early 1930s, and captures the spirit and flair with which these Bauhaus geniuses lived, as well as their consuming goal of making art and architecture.

  • Silver Wind - The Arts of Sakai Hoitsu (1761-1828)

    Sakai Hōitsu was one of the most prominent painters of late 18th- and early 19th-century Japan, known for technical bravura, arresting compositions, and striking use of color. After becoming a Buddhist monk, Hōitsu was able to dedicate himself to painting, establishing a studio and studying the work of Ogata Kōrin (1658-1716). Hōitsu successfully revived the earlier artist's style, which later came to be known as Rimpa, "the school of Kōrin."

    The first book in English to focus exclusively on the work of this important artist, Silver Wind examines fifty-eight of Hōitsu's works and those of his predecessors and artistic heirs, ranging from scrolls and screens to fans, lacquer, and woodblock-printed books. Accompanying essays explore Hōitsu's discovery and reinterpretation of Kōrin's artistic legacy; the aesthetics of the Rimpa style; and the career of Suzuki Kiitsu, his leading student.

  • Florence - A Walking Guide to Its Architecture

    Each year, millions of visitors travel to Florence to admire the architectural marvels of this famous Renaissance city. In this compact yet comprehensive volume, architect and architectural historian Richard J. Goy offers a convenient, accessible guide to the city's piazzas, palazzos, basilicas, and other architectural points of interest, as well as pertinent historical details regarding Florence's unique urban environment.

    Clearly laid out and fully illustrated, this handbook is designed around a series of expertly planned walking tours that encompass not only the city's most admired architectural sites, but also its lesser-known gems. Maps are tailored to each walking tour and provide additional references and insights, along with introductory chapters on the city's architectural history, urban design, and building materials and techniques. Featuring a complete bibliography, glossary of key terms, and other useful reference materials, Goy's guide will appeal both to travelers who desire a greater architectural context and analysis than that offered by a traditional guide and to return visitors looking to rediscover Florence's most enchanting sites.

  • The Roof at the Bottom of the World - Discovering the Transantarctic Mountains

    The Transantarctic Mountains are the most remote mountain belt on Earth, an utterly pristine wilderness of ice and rock rising to majestic heights and extending for 1,500 miles. In this book, Edmund Stump is the first to show us this continental-scale mountain system in all its stunning beauty and desolation, and the first to provide a comprehensive, fully illustrated history of the region's discovery and exploration. The author not only has conducted extensive research in the Transantarctic Mountains during his forty-year career as a geologist but has also systematically photographed the entire region. Selecting the best of the best of his more than 8,000 photographs, he presents nothing less than the first atlas of these mountains. In addition, he examines the original firsthand accounts of the heroic Antarctic explorations of James Clark Ross (who discovered the mountain range in the early 1840s), Robert Falcon Scott, Ernest Shackleton, Roald Amundsen, Richard Byrd and scientists participating in the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958). From these records, Stump is now able to trace the actual routes of the early explorers with unprecedented accuracy. With maps old and new, stunning photographs never before published, and tales of intrepid explorers, this book takes the armchair traveller on an expedition to the Antarctic wilderness that few have ever seen.

  • The Political Spectrum: The Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology, from Herbert Hoover to the Smartphone

    From the former chief economist of the FCC, a remarkable history of the U.S. government's regulation of the airwaves

    Popular legend has it that before the Federal Radio Commission was established in 1927, the radio spectrum was in chaos, with broadcasting stations blasting powerful signals to drown out rivals. In this fascinating and entertaining history, Thomas Winslow Hazlett, a distinguished scholar in law and economics, debunks the idea that the U.S. government stepped in to impose necessary order. Instead, regulators blocked competition at the behest of incumbent interests and, for nearly a century, have suppressed innovation while quashing out-of-the-mainstream viewpoints.

    Hazlett details how spectrum officials produced a "vast wasteland" that they publicly criticized but privately protected. The story twists and turns, as farsighted visionaries--and the march of science--rise to challenge the old regime. Over decades, reforms to liberate the radio spectrum have generated explosive progress, ushering in the "smartphone revolution," ubiquitous social media, and the amazing wireless world now emerging. Still, the author argues, the battle is not even half won.

  • Marcel Proust - A Life

    Reissued with a new preface to commemorate the first publication of A la recherche du temps perdu one hundred years ago, Marcel Proust portrays in abundant detail the extraordinary life and times of one of the greatest literary voices of the twentieth century. "An impeccably researched and well-paced narrative that brings vividly and credibly to life not only the writer himself but also the changing world he knew."--Roger Pearson, New York Times Book Review "William C. Carter is Proust's definitive biographer."--Harold Bloom Named a Notable Book of 2000 by the New York Times Book Review

  • Wellington - The Path to Victory 1769-1814

    A landmark contribution to understanding the real man behind the heroic legend inspired by the triumph at Waterloo

    The Duke of Wellington was not just Britain's greatest soldier, although his seismic struggles as leader of the Allied forces against Napoleon in the Peninsular War deservedly became the stuff of British national legend. Wellington was much more: a man of vision beyond purely military matters, a politically astute thinker, and a canny diplomat as well as lover, husband, and friend. Rory Muir's masterful new biography, the first of a two-volume set, is the fruit of a lifetime's research and discovery into Wellington and his times. The author brings Wellington into much sharper focus than ever before, addressing his masterstrokes and mistakes in equal measure. Muir looks at all aspects of Wellington's career, from his unpromising youth through his remarkable successes in India and his role as junior minister in charge of Ireland, to his controversial military campaigns. With dramatic descriptions of major battles and how they might have turned out differently, the author underscores the magnitude of Wellington's achievements. The biography is the first to address the major significance of Wellington's political connections and shrewdness, and to set his career within the wider history of British politics and the war against Napoleon. The volume also revises Wellington's reputation for being cold and aloof, showing instead a man of far more complex and interesting character.

  • The Ethiopian Revolution - War in the Horn of Africa

    Revolution, civil wars, and guerilla warfare wracked Ethiopia during three turbulent decades at the end of the twentieth century. This book is a pioneering study of the military history and political significance of this crucial Horn of Africa region during that period. Drawing on new archival materials and interviews, Gebru Tareke illuminates the conflicts, comparing them to the Russian and Iranian revolutions in terms of regional impact.

    Writing in vigorous and accessible prose, Tareke brings to life the leading personalities in the domestic political struggles, strategies of the warring parties, international actors, and key battles. He demonstrates how the brutal dictatorship of Mengistu Haile Mariam lacked imagination in responding to crises and alienated the peasantry by destroying human and material resources. And he describes the delicate balance of persuasion and force with which northern insurgents mobilized the peasantry and triumphed. The book sheds invaluable light not only on modern Ethiopia but also on post-colonial state formation and insurrectionary politics worldwide.

  • James Stirling - Revisionary Modernist

    James Stirling (1926-1992) was one of the most influential architects of the late 20th century. His formally inventive yet historically informed designs inspired a generation of architects in his native England and throughout the world. James Stirling: Revisionary Modernist is the first in-depth, book-length analysis of the architect's work. Amanda Reeser Lawrence focuses on six of Stirling's projects from the early 1950s through the late 1970s, offering detailed formal analysis of the buildings and drawings while also mapping his relationship to a broader architectural and cultural context. Though it is widely held that Stirling took a mid-career turn toward postmodernism, Lawrence shows that he was undeniably modern throughout his career. She clarifies the ways in which Stirling understood modernism as inextricably linked to the past and placed his own work in what he termed a "dialogue with architectural tradition."

  • Dragonflies - Magnificent Creatures of Water, Air, and Land

    A gorgeous tribute to the magic and mystique of dragonflies, with intimate photographs of their entire life cycle

    Almost without our noticing, dragonflies dart through our world, flying, seeing, hunting, mating. Their lives are as mysterious as their gossamer wings are beautiful. In this book Pieter van Dokkum reveals many of the dragonfly's secrets, capturing the stages of this striking insect's life cycle in unprecedented close-up photographs. He documents scenes of dragonfly activity seldom witnessed and rarely photographed.

    The book begins on a moonlit summer night, when an alien-looking larva crawls out of the water and transforms into a fully formed dragonfly. In the following chapters we witness dew-covered dragonflies sparkling in the morning sun, then a pair of mating dragonflies moving through the air in a twelve-legged, eight-winged dance. In the final chapter, one generation dies as the next prepares to leave the water and begin its own winged journey. Each stage is documented through van Dokkum's inquisitive lens and accompanied by information on various species of dragonflies and damselflies, their metamorphosis, and their ecological importance as insect predators.

  • The Christian Imagination

    A ground-breaking, magisterial account of the potential and failures of Christianity since the colonialist period

    Why has Christianity, a religion premised upon neighborly love, failed in its attempts to heal social divisions? In this ambitious and wide-ranging work, Willie James Jennings delves deep into the late medieval soil in which the modern Christian imagination grew, to reveal how Christianity's highly refined process of socialization has inadvertently created and maintained segregated societies. A probing study of the cultural fragmentation--social, spatial, and racial--that took root in the Western mind, this book shows how Christianity has consistently forged Christian nations rather than encouraging genuine communion between disparate groups and individuals.

    Weaving together the stories of Zurara, the royal chronicler of Prince Henry, the Jesuit theologian Jose de Acosta, the famed Anglican Bishop John William Colenso, and the former slave writer Olaudah Equiano, Jennings narrates a tale of loss, forgetfulness, and missed opportunities for the transformation of Christian communities. Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race.

    Using his bold, creative, and courageous critique to imagine a truly cosmopolitan citizenship that transcends geopolitical, nationalist, ethnic, and racial boundaries, Jennings charts, with great vision, new ways of imagining ourselves, our communities, and the landscapes we inhabit.

  • Caravaggio′s Pitiful Relics

    The renowned Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) established his career in Catholic Rome, making paintings that placed particular importance on sacred relics and the glorification of martyred saints. Beginning with his early works, Caravaggio was intensely engaged with the physical world. He not only interrogated appearances but also experimented with the paint's material nature. Caravaggio's Pitiful Relics explores how the artist's commitment to materiality served and ultimately challenged the Counter Reformation church's interests. In his first ecclesiastical commission, Caravaggio offered an unconventional representation of martyrdom that collapsed the borders between art, contemporary religious persecution, iconoclasm, and relics in early Christian catacombs. Yet his art controversially and eventually led to a criminal trial. After he had fled from Rome in disgrace, his major altarpiece depicting the death of the Virgin Mary, portraying her mortality rather than her sanctity, was removed. Caravaggio's materiality came into conflict with changing notions of the sacred; thereafter, the sacred object became a secular work of art, marking the displacement of the relic.

  • For Kith and Kin - Folk Art at the Art Insitute of Chicago

    The Art Institute of Chicago is home to one of the world's finest collections of American folk art. For Kith and Kin provides an introduction to that collection through more than sixty of its most outstanding objects. Selected by premier American art scholar Judith A. Barter, the majority of these objects have never before been published.

    In a groundbreaking opening essay, Barter revisits the earliest days of folk-art collecting in Chicago, beginning in the 1890s. She pays special attention to the passionate individuals who sought out unique and expressive examples of American folk art, building private collections that they later donated to the Art Institute. Including beautiful reproductions and detailed entries for each of the sixty-one objects it features, this book highlights an array of masterworks such as "primitive" New England portraits, a face jug from South Carolina, New Mexican ceramics, a weathervane, and ship figureheads.

  • The Long, Long Life of Trees

    A lyrical tribute to the diversity of trees, their physical beauty, their special characteristics and uses, and their ever-evolving meanings

    Since the beginnings of history trees have served humankind in countless useful ways, but our relationship with trees has many dimensions beyond mere practicality. Trees are so entwined with human experience that diverse species have inspired their own stories, myths, songs, poems, paintings, and spiritual meanings. Some have achieved status as religious, cultural, or national symbols.

    In this beautifully illustrated volume Fiona Stafford offers intimate, detailed explorations of seventeen common trees, from ash and apple to pine, oak, cypress, and willow. The author also pays homage to particular trees, such as the fabled Ankerwyke Yew, under which Henry VIII courted Anne Boleyn, and the spectacular cherry trees of Washington, D.C. Stafford discusses practical uses of wood past and present, tree diseases and environmental threats, and trees' potential contributions toward slowing global climate change. Brimming with unusual topics and intriguing facts, this book celebrates trees and their long, long lives as our inspiring and beloved natural companions.

  • Futures of Surrealism - Myth, Science Fiction, and Fantastic Art in France, 1936 1969

    Although Surrealism is usually associated with the 1920s and 1930s, it remained a vital force in Paris throughout the postwar period. This important book offers the first detailed account in English of the trajectory of the French Surrealists in the 1950s and 1960s, giving particular emphasis to the significance of myth for the group in its reception of science fiction and its engagement with fantastic art. Offering new readings of the art and writings of the later generation of Surrealists, Gavin Parkinson demonstrates how they were connected to the larger cultural and political debates of the time. Whereas earlier Surrealist art and writing drew on psychoanalytic practices, younger Surrealists engaged with contemporary issues, ideas, and themes of the period of the Cold War and Algerian War (1954-62), such as parapsychology, space travel, fantastic art, increasing consumerism in Europe, emerging avant-gardes such as Nouveau Realisme, and the rise of the whole genre of conspiracy theory, from Nazi occultism to flying saucers. Futures of Surrealism offers a unique perspective on this brave new world.

  • A Queer History of Fashion - From the Closet to the Catwalk

    An unprecedented in-depth exploration of the complex interrelationship between high fashion and queer history and culture

    From Christian Dior to Yves Saint Laurent and Alexander McQueen, many of the greatest fashion designers of the past century have been gay. Fashion and style have played an important role within the LGBTQ community, as well, even as early as the 18th century. This provocative book looks at the history of fashion through a queer lens, examining high fashion as a site of gay cultural production and exploring the aesthetic sensibilities and unconventional dress of LGBTQ people, especially since the 1950s, to demonstrate the centrality of gay culture to the creation of modern fashion.

    Contributions by some of the world's most acclaimed scholars of gay history and fashion - including Christopher Breward, Shaun Cole, Vicki Karaminas, Jonathan D. Katz, Peter McNeil, and Elizabeth Wilson - investigate topics such as the context in which key designers' lives and works form part of a broader "gay" history; the "archeology" of queer attire back to the homosexual underworld of 18th-century Europe; and the influence of LGBTQ subcultural styles from the trouser suits worn by Marlene Dietrich (which inspired Yves Saint Laurent's "Le Smoking") to the iconography of leather. Sumptuous illustrations include both fashion photography and archival imagery.

  • The Voting Wars - From Florida 2000 to the Next Election Meltdown

    In 2000, just a few hundred votes out of millions cast in the state of Florida separated Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush from his Democratic opponent, Al Gore. The outcome of the election rested on Florida's 25 electoral votes, and legal wrangling continued for 36 days. Then, abruptly, one of the most controversial Supreme Court decisions in U.S. history, Bush v. Gore, cut short the battle. Since the Florida debacle we have witnessed a partisan war over election rules. Election litigation has skyrocketed, and election time brings out inevitable accusations by political partisans of voter fraud and voter suppression. These allegations have shaken public confidence, as campaigns deploy "armies of lawyers" and the partisan press revs up when elections are expected to be close and the stakes are high.

    Richard L. Hasen, a respected authority on election law, chronicles and analyzes the battles over election rules from 2000 to the present. From a nonpartisan standpoint he explores the rising number of election-related lawsuits and charges of voter fraud as well as the decline of public confidence in fair results. He explains why future election disputes will be worse than previous ones--more acrimonious, more distorted by unsubstantiated allegations, and amplified by social media. No reader will fail to conclude with Hasen that election reform is an urgent priority, one that demands the attention of conscientious citizens and their elected representatives.

    Also available The Fraudulent Fraud Squad, an e-excerpt from The Voting Wars
    Released February 2012 9780300187489 $1.99

  • Maine Moderns

    Between 1900 and 1940, a group of modernist artists gathered regularly on the coast of Maine in a region then known as Seguinland. For photographer Paul Strand, painter Marsden Hartley, sculptor Gaston Lachaise, and others, it was a way to escape market-driven, competitive, and divisive New York City, and celebrate a new kind of American Modernism.

    In this beautifully illustrated book, Libby Bischof and Susan Danly explore the state's important place in the history of modern art and show how summers in Seguinland inspired a new classicism that merged the antique with the modern. They also shed light on how the various artists' experiences in the refreshing atmosphere on the Maine coast cemented their friendships, shaped their individual styles, and fostered their understanding of what it meant to be a modern artist.

  • The Corpse Washer

    Acclaimed and celebrated in the Arab world for its vivid portrait of Iraq, this heartbreaking novel confronts the war-torn nation's horrifying recent history


    Young Jawad, born to a traditional Shi'ite family of corpse washers and shrouders in Baghdad, decides to abandon the family tradition, choosing instead to become a sculptor, to celebrate life rather than tend to death. He enters Baghdad's Academy of Fine Arts in the late 1980s, in defiance of his father's wishes and determined to forge his own path. But the circumstances of history dictate otherwise. Saddam Hussein's dictatorship and the economic sanctions of the 1990s destroy the socioeconomic fabric of society. The 2003 invasion and military occupation unleash sectarian violence. Corpses pile up, and Jawad returns to the inevitable washing and shrouding. Trained as an artist to shape materials to represent life aesthetically, he now must contemplate how death shapes daily life and the bodies of Baghdad's inhabitants.

    Through the struggles of a single desperate family, Sinan Antoon's novel shows us the heart of Iraq's complex and violent recent history. Descending into the underworld where the borders between life and death are blurred and where there is no refuge from unending nightmares, Antoon limns a world of great sorrows, a world where the winds wail.

  • The Tchaikovsky Papers: Unlocking the Family Archive

    This fascinating collection of letters, notes, and miscellanea from the archives of the Tchaikovsky State House-Museum sheds new light on the world of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Most of these documents have never before been available in English, and they reveal the composer's daily concerns, private thoughts, and playful sense of humor. Often intimate and sometimes bawdy, these texts also offer a new perspective on Tchaikovsky's upbringing, his relations with family members, his patriotism, and his homosexuality, collectively contributing to a greater understanding of a major artist who had a profound impact on Russian culture and society. This is an essential compendium for cultural and social historians as well as musicologists and music lovers.

  • Building-in-Time From Giotto to Alberti and Modern Oblivion

    This ambitious book is about a way of building that for centuries dominated the making of monumental architecture - yet now not only is it lost as practice, but knowledge of its very existence is consigned to oblivion. In pre-modern Europe, the architect built not just with imagination, brick and mortar, but with time, using vast quantities of duration to erect monumental buildings that otherwise would have been impossible. Not mere medieval muddling-through, this entailed a sophisticated set of norms and practices. Virtually all the great cathedrals of France and the rest of Europe were built under this regime, here given the name 'Building-in-Time'. In particular, the major works of pre-modern Italy, from the Pisa cathedral group to the cathedrals of Milan, Venice and Siena, and from the monuments of fourteenth-century Florence to the new St Peter's - the apotheosis of the practice - are thus cast in an entirely new light. Even as 'Building-in-Time' was flourishing, the fifteenth-century Italian architect Leon Battista Alberti proposed a new temporal regime whereby time would ideally be excluded from the making of architecture ('Building-outside-Time'). Planning and building, which had formed one fluid, imbricated process, were to be sharply divided, and the change that always came with time excluded from architectural facture. Ironically, it was Brunelleschi, as creator of the cupola of Florence cathedral and one of the supreme practitioners of Building-in-Time, who was the lynchpin of Alberti's turn to the arts in the mid-1430s. That he arrived in Florence just at the moment Brunelleschi's dome was being completed was crucial to Alberti's subsequent career in visual culture. Yet his relationship to Brunelleschi was conflicted; first praising and attaching himself to Brunelleschi, later Alberti silently sought to banish him from history's central stage. In telling this story, Marvin Trachtenberg rewrites the history of medieval and Renaissance architecture in Italy and recasts the turn to modernity in new terms, those of temporality and its role in architectural theory and practice. Recovering this lost element of the deep architectural past allows us also to see the present in a new way: that temporality is not any neutral or secondary factor in modern architecture culture, but an epistemic condition that silently affects all production and experience of the built environment.

  • Poems of Hanshan

    Hanshan, which means Cold Mountain, was the pseudonym adopted by an unknown poet who lived in China as a hermit twelve hundred years ago. The poems collected under his name have had an immense impact worldwide, especially among Zen Buddhists, and have been translated into many languages. Peter Hobson's translation of more than a hundred of the poems, almost all of which are published for the first time in this volume, brings those qualities of timelessness, poetic diction and engaging rhythm that do justice to the concepts and language of the original. This edition includes not only a clear and succinct introduction for the general reader but also highly informative sections on Hanshan's place in history and on issues involved in translating Hanshan.

  • When Christians Were Jews: The First Generation

    A compelling account of Christianity's Jewish beginnings, from one of the world's leading scholars of ancient religion

    How did a group of charismatic, apocalyptic Jewish missionaries, working to prepare their world for the impending realization of God's promises to Israel, end up inaugurating a movement that would grow into the gentile church? Committed to Jesus's prophecy--"The Kingdom of God is at hand!"--they were, in their own eyes, history's last generation. But in history's eyes, they became the first Christians.

    In this electrifying social and intellectual history, Paula Fredriksen answers this question by reconstructing the life of the earliest Jerusalem community. As her account arcs from this group's hopeful celebration of Passover with Jesus, through their bitter controversies that fragmented the movement's midcentury missions, to the city's fiery end in the Roman destruction of Jerusalem, she brings this vibrant apostolic community to life. Fredriksen offers a vivid portrait both of this temple-centered messianic movement and of the bedrock convictions that animated and sustained it.

  • Giorgio De Chirico and the Metaphysical City

    Painted in Paris on the eve of World War One, the Metaphysical cityscapes of Giorgio de Chirico (1888-1978) redirected the course of modernist painting and the modern architectural imagination alike. 'Giorgio de Chirico and the Metaphysical City' examines the two most salient dimensions of the artist's early imagery: its representations of architectural space and its sustained engagement with the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Centering upon a single painting from 1914 - deemed by the painter 'the fatal year' - each chapter examines why and how de Chirico's self-declared 'Nietzschean method' takes architecture as its pictorial means and metaphor. The first, full-length study in English to focus on the painter's seminal work from pre-war Paris, the book places de Chirico's 'literary' images back in the context of the city's avant-garde, particularly the circle of Guillaume Apollinaire. Merjian's study sheds light on one of the most influential and least understood figures in 20th-century aesthetics, while also contributing to an understanding of Nietzsche's paradoxical consequences for modernism.

  • Art of the Ancient Near East - A Resource for Educators

    Many features of civilization originated in the lands we call the ancient Near East, a vast and varied area from Turkey to the Indus Valley of present-day Pakistan and from the Caucasus to the Arabian Peninsula. This essential guide for K-12 educators introduces the variety and diversity of art produced by the rich and complex cultures that flourished in this region during an equally vast time period, from the eighth millennium B.C. to the middle of the seventh century A.D. The fully illustrated publication provides the cultural, archaeological, and historical contexts for a selection of thirty works of art in the form of sculpture, silver and gold ritual vessels and objects, monumental reliefs, cuneiform tablets, and stamp and cylinder seals. Curriculum connections, discussion questions, lesson plans, and activities for a range of grade levels provide useful strategies for teaching in the classroom. Also included are maps, a chronology, bibliographies, web resources, and a glossary.

    These educational materials are made possible by Rolin Foundation USA.

  • South Ulster, the Counties of Armagh Cavan, and Monaghan - The Buildings of Ireland

    The South Ulster volume of the Buildings of Ireland covers the inland counties of Cavan, Monaghan and Armagh, an area stretching from the thinly populated uplands around the Cuilcagh Mountains and the cradle of the Shannon to the fertile Blackwater Valley and the southern shores of Lough Neagh. The architecture of the region is as varied as the landscapes that receive it, with building materials adding to the variety while ensuring that the buildings - whether vernacular in spirit or more formally designed - express a deep sense of belonging.

  • Cubism - The Leonard A. Lauder Collection

    An innovative new history of Cubism told through some of the most significant artworks ever produced, drawn from a distinguished private collection

    This groundbreaking new history of Cubism, based on works from the most significant private collection in the world today, is written by many of the field's premier art historians and scholars. The collection, recently donated to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, includes 80 works by Picasso, Braque, Gris, and Leger and is unsurpassed in the number of masterpieces and iconic pieces deemed critical to the development of Cubism.

    Twenty-two essays explore various facets of Cubism from its origins and consider small groupings of works in light of specific themes--such as a study by neuropsychiatrist Eric Kandel on Cubism and the science of perception. Also included is a fascinating interview in which Lauder discusses his approach to collecting. This is a work to place beside other great histories of Modernism. It is a comprehensive, copiously illustrated book that offers a greater understanding of Cubism and will stand as a resource on this pioneering style for many years to come.

  • Treasures of Vacheron Constantin - A Legacy of Watchmaking Since 1755

    This sumptuous book brings to life the rich past and the landmark creations of one of the world's great watchmakers. Founded in the Swiss city of Geneva in 1755 by the gifted craftsman and businessman Jean-Marc Vacheron, Vacheron Constantin is the oldest watch manufacturer in the world with an uninterrupted history. Its phenomenal rise to an international reputation of the highest standing in turn throws light on the global success of the great Swiss watchmaking tradition.

    The book traces the principal milestones in the company's history: its founding during the Age of Enlightenment; the successive generations of the Vacheron family; the association in 1819 with Francois Constantin, who opened up the North American market to the company; the transformational relationship with the inventor Georges-Auguste Leschot; and the company's subsequent international recognition and expansion. Through an array of glorious illustrations, it presents Vacheron Constantin's historical collections, while highlighting the creations of the craftsmen who contribute to the technical excellence of its timepieces--the master-watchmakers--and the artisans who transform them into genuine objets d'art--the master engravers, guillocheurs, jewelers and enamelers.

  • Yves Saint Laurent + Halston - Fashioning the '70s

    A dazzling examination of the two designers behind the most iconic and glamorous fashions of the 1970s

    This fascinating publication is the first to examine side by side the careers and work of two of the biggest names in 20th-century fashion, Yves Saint Laurent (1936-2008) and Halston (1932-1990). Their designs--chic, sexy, and glamorous--came to exemplify the 1970s, a singular and dynamic era in fashion history. Inspired by menswear, foreign cultures, and wide-ranging historical periods, and employing new fabrics, YSL and Halston together crafted a new and distinctly modern way of dressing.

    Moreover, although their output differed and they were based on different continents, the two designers shared many career parallels. A visual timeline of the designers' lives illustrates how their rises and falls, from the 1950s to their respective struggles in the 1980s, were surprisingly in sync. Engaging passages by Patricia Mears and Emma McClendon discuss the social, cultural, and economic factors that influenced both designers, and their subsequent impact on fashion--including the rise of the star designer as personality, the cult of celebrity, and the creation of the fashion conglomerate. The authors also address the importance of color, cutting-edge materials, innovative construction techniques, accessories, and perfume to both designers' aesthetics. Remarkable photographs of the designers and their garments round out this essential volume on two figures who made an indelible mark on fashion history.

  • An International Civil War: Greece, 1943-1949

    An authoritative history of the Greek Civil War and its profound influence on American foreign policy and the post-Second World War period

    In his comprehensive history Andre Gerolymatos demonstrates how the Greek Civil War played a pivotal role in the shaping of policy and politics in post-Second World War Europe and America and was a key starting point of the Cold War. Based in part on recently declassified documents from Greece, the United States, and the British Intelligence Services, this masterful study sheds new light on the aftershocks that have rocked Greece in the seven decades following the end of the bitter hostilities.

  • Flora Illustrata - Great Works from the LuEsther T. Mertz Library of The New York Botanical Garden

    The renowned LuEsther T. Mertz Library of The New York Botanical Garden counts among its holdings many of the most beautiful and pioneering botanical and horticultural works ever created. More than eight centuries of knowledge, from the twelfth century to the present, are represented in the library's collection of over one million items. In this sumptuously illustrated volume, international experts introduce us to some of the library's most fascinating works - exceedingly rare books, stunning botanical artworks, handwritten manuscripts, Renaissance herbals, nursery catalogues, explorers' notebooks, and more. The contributors hold these treasures up for close inspection and offer surprising insights into their histories and importance. The diverse materials showcased in the volume reflect the creative efforts of eminent explorers, scientists, artists, publishers, and print makers. From the rare, illuminated pages of Pliny the Elder's Naturalis historia (1483), to the earliest book ever published on American insects (1797), to lovely etchings of the water gardens at Villa Pratolino in Florence (1600s), the Mertz Library holdings will inspire in readers a new appreciation for the extraordinary history of botany and its far-reaching connections to the worlds of science, books, art, and culture.

  • Democracy in Retreat - The Revolt of the Middle Class and the Worldwide Decline of Representative Government

    A challenge to conventional wisdom about the spread of democracy

    Since the end of the Cold War, the assumption among most political theorists has been that as nations develop economically, they will also become more democratic--especially if a vibrant middle class takes root. This assumption underlies the expansion of the European Union and much of American foreign policy, bolstered by such examples as South Korea, the Philippines, Taiwan, and even to some extent Russia. Where democratization has failed or retreated, aberrant conditions take the blame: Islamism, authoritarian Chinese influence, or perhaps the rise of local autocrats. But what if the failures of democracy are not exceptions? In this thought-provoking study of democratization, Joshua Kurlantzick proposes that the spate of retreating democracies, one after another over the past two decades, is not just a series of exceptions. Instead, it reflects a new and disturbing trend: democracy in worldwide decline. The author investigates the state of democracy in a variety of countries, why the middle class has turned against democracy in some cases, and whether the decline in global democratization is reversible.

  • The Spirit of Zoroastrianism

    An introduction to the ideas and writings of Zoroastrianism, expertly translated, introduced, and edited by one of the world's foremost authorities on this religion

    Zoroastrianism is one of the world's oldest religions, though it is not among the best understood. Originating with Iranian tribes living in Central Asia in the second millennium BCE, Zoroastrianism was the official religion of the Iranian empires until Islam superseded it in the seventh century AD. Centered on the worship of Ahura Mazda, the All-knowing Ruler, Zoroastrianism follows the practices and rituals set out by the prophet Zarathustra, according to the indigenous tradition.

    As one of the world's great religions, Zoroastrianism has a heritage rich in texts and cultic practices. The texts are often markedly difficult to translate, but in this volume, Prods Oktor Skjaervo, professor of ancient Iranian languages and culture at Harvard, provides modern and accurate translations of Zoroastrian texts that have been selected to provide an overview of Zoroastrian beliefs and practices. In a comprehensive introduction to these sacred texts, Skjaervo outlines the history and essence of Zoroastrianism and discusses the major themes of this the first fully representative selection of Zoroastrian texts to be made available in English for over a century.

  • Cnut the Great

    A seminal biography of the underappreciated eleventh-century Scandinavian warlord-turned-Anglo-Saxon monarch who united the English and Danish crowns to forge a North Sea empire

    Historian Timothy Bolton offers a fascinating reappraisal of one of the most misunderstood of the Anglo-Saxon kings: Cnut, the powerful Danish warlord who conquered England and created a North Sea empire in the eleventh century. This seminal biography draws from a wealth of written and archaeological sources to provide the most detailed accounting to date of the life and accomplishments of a remarkable figure in European history, a forward-thinking warrior-turned-statesman who created a new Anglo-Danish regime through designed internationalism.

  • James Ensor - The Temptation of Saint Anthony

    This engaging volume describes the creation and restoration of the extraordinary large-scale drawing The Temptation of Saint Anthony--a work by late 19th-century Belgian artist James Ensor (1860-1949)--on the occasion of its first public showing in more than 60 years. The piece is composed of 51 separate sheets of paper collaged into a hallucinatory social critique and artist's manifesto. Each sheet of the nearly six-foot-high work is reproduced at actual size, revealing Ensor's remarkable technique and fertile imagination. Here, Saint Anthony is surrounded not with nature, as customary, but with the moral decay of society. Replete with tiny scenes depicting both sexual temptation and spiritual piety, Ensor splices potent imagery from travelogues, popular science, and technology magazines into a Symbolist masterpiece. Susan M. Canning, Patrick Florizoone, and Nancy Ireson analyze the drawing's meaning; Herwig Todts details its origins and early history; and Kimberly J. Nichols recounts the work's restoration.

  • The Life of the Virgin - Maximus the Confessor

    Long overlooked by scholars, this seventh-century Life of the Virgin, attributed to Maximus the Confessor, is the earliest complete Marian biography. Originally written in Greek and now surviving only in Old Georgian, it is now translated for the first time into English. It is a work that holds profound significance for understanding the history of late ancient and medieval Christianity, providing a rich source for understanding the history of Christian piety.

    This Life is especially remarkable for its representation of Mary's prominent involvement in her son's ministry and her leadership of the early Christian community. In particular, it reveals highly developed devotion to Mary's compassionate suffering at the Crucifixion, anticipating by several centuries an influential medieval style of devotion known as "affective piety" whose origins generally have been confined to the Western High Middle Ages.

  • Art in Oceania: A New History

    A spectacular survey of the artistic traditions of Oceania, spanning the islands' initial settlement in the prehistoric era through the 21st century

    Masks and figural sculptures are the most familiar examples of the visual culture of Oceania, yet they provide only a glimpse of the fascinating art of this diverse region. Artisans of the Pacific Islands and Australia have produced objects ranging from stained and beaten fabric, rock engravings, and woven containers to tattooed and painted bodies, drawings on sand and paper, and contemporary installation art. This survey looks at the full range of objects created over several millennia, spanning the settlement of Oceania in the prehistoric period to the present day.

    Lavishly illustrated and encyclopedic in scope, this landmark book places the art of Oceania in its comprehensive and often complex historical context. Essays by leading scholars offer a fresh approach to archaeological findings; the impacts of migration, trade, warfare, and colonization; the influence of materials, ritual, dance, and religion; and the roles of photography, tourism, nationalism, and popular culture. Featuring a rich selection of previously unpublished materials and accompanied by commentary from contemporary practitioners, Art in Oceania: A New History is essential reading, offering an important reinterpretation of existing scholarship, and a dynamic introduction to Oceanic artistic traditions in the 21st century.

  • Global Crisis - War, Climate Change and Catastrophe in the Seventeenth Century

    Revolutions, droughts, famines, invasions, wars, regicides - the calamities of the mid-seventeenth century were not only unprecedented, they were agonisingly widespread. A global crisis extended from England to Japan, and from the Russian Empire to sub-Saharan Africa. North and South America, too, suffered turbulence. The distinguished historian Geoffrey Parker examines first-hand accounts of men and women throughout the world describing what they saw and suffered during a sequence of political, economic and social crises that stretched from 1618 to the 1680s. Parker's demonstration of the link between climate change and worldwide catastrophe 350 years ago stands as an extraordinary historical achievement.

  • An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873

    The first full account of the government-sanctioned genocide of California Indians under United States rule

    Between 1846 and 1873, California's Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley is the first historian to uncover the full extent of the slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended. This deeply researched book is a comprehensive and chilling history of an American genocide.

    Madley describes pre-contact California and precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence against California Indians. He narrates the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Many participated: vigilantes, volunteer state militiamen, U.S. Army soldiers, U.S. congressmen, California governors, and others. The state and federal governments spent at least $1,700,000 on campaigns against California Indians. Besides evaluating government officials' culpability, Madley considers why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book.

  • Reason, Faith and Revolution - Reflections on the God Debate

    Terry Eagleton's witty and polemical 'Reason, Faith, and Revolution' is bound to cause a stir among scientists, theologians, people of faith and people of no faith, as well as general readers eager to understand the God Debate. On the one hand, Eagleton demolishes what he calls the 'superstitious' view of God held by most atheists and agnostics, and offers in its place a revolutionary account of the Christian Gospel. On the other hand, he launches a stinging assault on the betrayal of this revolution by institutional Christianity. There is little joy here, then, either for the anti-God brigade - Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens in particular - nor for many conventional believers. Instead, Eagleton offers his own vibrant account of religion and politics in a book that ranges from the Holy Spirit to the recent history of the Middle East, from Thomas Aquinas to the Twin Towers.

  • Lee Bontecou - Drawn Worlds

    The first survey of more than fifty years of drawing by a legendary sculptor and draftswoman

    Lee Bontecou (b. 1931) established a significant reputation in the 1960s with pioneering sculptures and reliefs made of raw and expressionistic materials. Her art is simultaneously organic and mechanical, and infused with biological, geological, and technological motifs. These same qualities also animate a less-known but compelling body of work: her drawings. Ranging from her early soot on paper works created using powder from a welding torch to recent drawings in pencil and colored pencil that evoke cosmoses and microcosmic worlds, this stunning book is the first retrospective survey of Bontecou's consistently innovative drawings. More than sixty full-color plates, populated by imagery ranging from black voids to mechanomorphs to hybrid descendants of teeth, plants, and fish, are complemented by original essays from leading scholars who explore themes such as the drawings' historical contexts, Bontecou's use of the iconography of the void, and the eco-apocalyptic themes of an artist who came of age in the roiling political atmosphere of the 1960s.

  • The Science of Human Perfection - How Genes Became the Heart of American Medicine

    A thoughtful new look at the entwined histories of genetic medicine and eugenics, with probing discussion of the moral risks of seeking human perfection

    Almost daily we hear news stories, advertisements, and scientific reports promising that genetic medicine will make us live longer, enable doctors to identify and treat diseases before they harm us, and individualize our medical care. But surprisingly, a century ago eugenicists were making the same promises. This book traces the history of the promises of medical genetics and of the medical dimension of eugenics. While mindful of the benefits of genetic medicine, the book also considers social and ethical issues that cast troublesome shadows over these fields.

    Keeping his focus on America, Nathaniel Comfort introduces the community of scientists, physicians, and public health workers who have contributed to the development of medical genetics from the nineteenth century to today. He argues that medical genetics is closely related to eugenics, and indeed that the two cannot be fully understood separately. He also carefully examines how the desire to relieve suffering and to improve ourselves genetically, though noble, may be subverted. History makes clear that as patients and consumers we must take ownership of genetic medicine, using it intelligently, knowledgeably, and skeptically.

  • Handbags - The Making of a Museum

    An exploration of the role of the handbag in the history of culture, fashion, and material production

    The history of the handbag--its design, how it has been made, used, and worn--reveals something essential about women's lives over the past 500 years. Perhaps the most universal item of fashionable adornment, it can also be elusive, an object of desire, secrecy, and even fear. Handbags explores these rich histories and multiple meanings.

    This book features specially commissioned photographs of an extraordinary, newly formed collection of fashionable handbags that date from the 16th century to the present day. It has been acquired for exhibition in the first museum devoted to the handbag, in Seoul, South Korea. The project is a commission undertaken by experimental exhibition-maker Judith Clark, whose innovative practices are revealed in Handbags.

    Essays by leading fashion historians and an acclaimed psychoanalyst investigate the history of gesture, the psychoanalysis of bags, and the museum's state-of-the-art mannequins and archive cabinets. In order to preserve the words that describe the unique qualities of each bag, a terminology of handbags has been compiled.

  • Radiant Truths - Essential Dispatches, Reports, Confessions, and Other Essays on American Belief

    A startling and immensely pleasurable collection of American writings on belief, from the Civil War to Occupy Wall Street

    Beginning with Walt Whitman singing hymns at a wounded soldier's bedside during the Civil War, this surprising and vivid anthology ranges straight through to the twenty-first century to end with Francine Prose crying tears of complicated joy at the sight of Whitman's words in Zuccotti Park during the brief days of the Occupy movement. The first anthology of its kind, Radiant Truths gathers an exquisite selection of writings by both well-known and forgotten American authors and thinkers, each engaged in the challenges of writing about religion, of documenting "things unseen." Their contributions to the genre of literary journalism--the telling of factual stories using the techniques of fiction and poetry--make this volume one of the most exciting anthologies of creative nonfiction to have emerged in years.

    Jeff Sharlet presents an evocative selection of writings that illuminate the evolution of the American genre of documentary prose. Each entry may be savored separately, but together the works enrich one another, engaging in an implicit and continuing conversation that reaches across time and generations.

    Including works by:
    Walt Whitman - Henry David Thoreau - Mark Twain - Meridel Le Sueur - Zora Neale Hurston - Mary McCarthy - James Baldwin - Norman Mailer - Ellen Willis - Anne Fadiman - John Jeremiah Sullivan - Francine Prose - Garry Wills - and many others

  • Fashion Plates: 150 Years of Style

    A sumptuously illustrated, encyclopedic chronicle of fashion and its trends, from the 18th to the early 20th century

    Prior to the invention of photography, European and American magazines used colorful prints to depict the latest fashion trends. These illustrations, known as "fashion plates," conveyed the cutting-edge styles embraced by the fashion-conscious elite and proved inspirational to the upwardly mobile. This lavishly illustrated book provides a comprehensive survey of 200 color plates from publications dating from 1778 to the early 20th century, accompanied by authoritative and fascinating texts. Organized chronologically and featuring both men's and women's garments, these lively and colorful vignettes not only are beautiful, but also deftly illustrate the evolution of fashion over time.

  • Durer and Beyond - Central European Drawings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1400-1700

    Durer and Beyond presents a selection of 100 works from the Metropolitan Museum's outstanding collection of German, Swiss, Austrian, and Bohemian drawings. Featured are numerous drawings by Albrecht Durer, including his celebrated study sheet with a self-portrait. In addition to drawings by major artists such as Martin Schongauer, Albrecht Altdorfer, Urs Graf, Hans Holbein the Younger, Friedrich Sustris, and Wenceslaus Hollar, the selection also highlights work by lesser known but equally superb draftsmen from the 14th to the end of the 17th century. Richly illustrated and fully documented with artist biographies, comparative illustrations, and enlightening commentary on the variety, quality, and purpose of the featured drawings, this book makes a significant scholarly contribution to a field that has not been widely explored.

  • Madness and Memory - The Discovery of Prions - A New Biological Principle of Disease

    A first-person account of a revolutionary scientific discovery that is now helping to unravel the mysteries of brain diseases

    In 1997, Stanley B. Prusiner received a Nobel Prize, the world's most prestigious award for achievement in physiology or medicine. That he was the sole recipient of the award for the year was entirely appropriate. His struggle to identify the agent responsible for ravaging the brains of animals suffering from scrapie and mad cow disease, and of humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, had been waged largely alone and in some cases in the face of strenuous disagreement.

    In this book, Prusiner tells the remarkable story of his discovery of prions--infectious proteins that replicate and cause disease but surprisingly contain no genetic material--and reveals how superb and meticulous science is actually practiced with talented teams of researchers who persevere. He recounts the frustrations and rewards of years of research and offers fascinating portraits of his peers as they raced to discover the causes of fatal brain diseases. Prusiner's hypothesis, once considered heresy, now stands as accepted science and the basis for developing diagnoses and eventual cures. He closes with a meditation on the legacy of his discovery: What will it take to cure Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Lou Gehrig's and other devastating diseases of the brain?

  • America Dancing - From the Cakewalk to the Moonwalk

    An exuberant history of American dance, told through the lives of virtuoso performers who have defined the art

    The history of American dance reflects the nation's tangled culture. Dancers from wildly different backgrounds learned, imitated, and stole from one another. Audiences everywhere embraced the result as deeply American.

    Using the stories of tapper Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire, ballet and Broadway choreographer Agnes de Mille, choreographer Paul Taylor, and Michael Jackson, Megan Pugh shows how freedom--that nebulous, contested American ideal--emerges as a genre-defining aesthetic. In Pugh's account, ballerinas mingle with slumming thrill-seekers, and hoedowns show up on elite opera house stages. Steps invented by slaves on antebellum plantations captivate the British royalty and the Parisian avant-garde. Dances were better boundary crossers than their dancers, however, and the issues of race and class that haunt everyday life shadow American dance as well. Deftly narrated, America Dancing demonstrates the centrality of dance in American art, life, and identity, taking us to watershed moments when the nation worked out a sense of itself through public movement.

  • Fires of Faith - Catholic England Under Mary Tudor

    The reign of Mary Tudor has been remembered as an era of sterile repression, when a reactionary monarch launched a doomed attempt to reimpose Catholicism on an unwilling nation. Above all, the burning alive of more than 280 men and women for their religious beliefs seared the rule of 'Bloody Mary' into the protestant imagination as an alien aberration in the onward and upward march of the English-speaking peoples. In this controversial reassessment, the renowned reformation historian Eamon Duffy argues that Mary's regime was neither inept nor backward looking. Led by the queen's cousin, Cardinal Reginald Pole, Marys church dramatically reversed the religious revolution imposed under the child king Edward VI. Inspired by the values of the European Counter-Reformation, the cardinal and the queen reinstated the papacy and launched an effective propaganda campaign through pulpit and press. Even the most notorious aspect of the regime, the burnings, proved devastatingly effective. Only the death of the childless queen and her cardinal on the same day in November 1558 brought the protestant Elizabeth to the throne, thereby changing the course of English history.

  • How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower

    A major new history of the fall of the Roman Empire, by the prizewinning author of Caesar

    In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable, its vast territory accounting for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken Eastern Empire remained. In his account of the fall of the Roman Empire, prizewinning author Adrian Goldsworthy examines the painful centuries of the superpower's decline. Bringing history to life through the stories of the men, women, heroes, and villains involved, the author uncovers surprising lessons about the rise and fall of great nations.

    This was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Goldsworthy pays particular attention to the willingness of Roman soldiers to fight and kill each other. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state.

  • Garry Winogrand

    Widely regarded as one of the most important photographers of the 20th century, Garry Winogrand (1928 1984) did much of his best-known work in Manhattan during the 1960s, becoming an epic chronicler of that tumultuous decade. But Winogrand was also an avid traveler and roamed extensively around the United States, bringing exquisite work out of nearly every region of the country.

    This landmark retrospective catalogue looks at the full sweep of Winogrand s exceptional career. Drawing from his enormous output, which at the time of his death included thousands of rolls of undeveloped film and unpublished contact sheets, the book will serve as the most substantial compendium of Winogrand s work to date. Lavishly illustrated with both iconic images and photographs that have never been seen before now, and featuring essays by leading scholars of American photography, " Garry Winogrand "presents a vivid portrait of an artist who unflinchingly captured America s swings between optimism and upheaval in the postwar era."

  • The Anti-Marcos Struggle - Personalistic Rule and Democratic Transition in the Philippines

    The Philippine dictatorship of Ferdinand E. Marcos was characterized by family-based rule and corruption. This sultanistic regime--in which the ruler exercised power freely, without loyalty to any ideology or institution--had to be brought down because Marcos would never step down. In this book Mark Thompson analyzes how Marcos' opponents in the political and economic elite coped with this situation and why their struggle resulted in a transition to democracy through "people power" rather than through violence and revolution.

    Based on 150 interviews that Thompson conducted with key participants and on unpublished materials collected during his five trips to the Philippines, the book sheds new light on the transition process. Thompson reveals how anti-Marcos politicians backed a terrorist campaign by social democrats and then, after its failure, joined a "united front" with the communists. But when opposition leader Benigno S. Aquino, Jr., was assassinated in 1983, the politicians were able to draw on public outrage and challenge Marcos at the polls. The opposition's "moral crusade" brought down Marcos and enabled the new president, Corazon C. Aquino, to consolidate democracy despite the troubling legacies of the dictatorship. Thompson argues that the Philippines' long-standing democratic tradition and the appeal that honest government had to the Filipinos were important elements in explaining the peaceful transition process.

  • The Music Libel against the Jews

    This deeply imaginative and wide-ranging book shows how, since the first centuries of the Christian era, gentiles have associated Jews with noise. Ruth HaCohen focuses her study on a "musical libel"--a variation on the Passion story that recurs in various forms and cultures in which an innocent Christian boy is killed by a Jew in order to silence his "harmonious musicality." In paying close attention to how and where this libel surfaces, HaCohen covers a wide swath of western cultural history, showing how entrenched aesthetic-theological assumptions have persistently defined European culture and its internal moral and political orientations.

    Ruth HaCohen combines in her comprehensive analysis the perspectives of musicology, literary criticism, philosophy, psychology, and anthropology, tracing the tensions between Jewish "noise" and idealized Christian "harmony" and their artistic manifestations from the high Middle Ages through Nazi Germany and beyond. She concludes her book with a passionate and moving argument for humanizing contemporary soundspaces.

  • Artist/Rebel/Dandy - Men of Fashion

    A wide-ranging exploration of the dandy and men's fashion over the past two centuries, from Beau Brummell to hip-hop

    Artist/Rebel/Dandy celebrates the pleasures of the sharp-dressed man, from the discreet sophistication of the consummately elegant George Bryan "Beau" Brummell in the early 19th century to the diverse, highly personal flair of the tastemakers who color the landscape of menswear today. Since the word "dandy" came into vogue in London in 1813, it has at times been used to describe someone superficial, flamboyant, and self-indulgent. Instead, the dandy is here shown to employ profound thought and imagination in his self-presentation, fashioning an image that often challenges the status quo and transcends the ordinary.

    A series of fascinating essays traces the often contradictory definitions and images of the dandy, the history of young men and their clothes in the long 19th century, the exquisite fabrics and tailoring that play an important role in dandy style, and the relationship of black dandyism and hip-hop. In addition, this book features fifteen musings on notable dandies written by individuals who share a kinship with their subject, including Patti Smith considering Charles Baudelaire; a reflection on Oscar Wilde by his grandson, Merlin Holland; Daniela Morera, formerly part of Andy Warhol's Factory crowd, reminiscing about the artist's image; and writer Philip Hoare describing the "thrift-shop dandyism" of director John Waters.

  • American Studio Ceramics - Innovation and Identity, 1940 to 1979

    An in-depth look at the changing status of American artists in the 18th and early 19th century

    In the mid-20th century, ceramics evolved from a utilitarian craft or therapeutic hobby into a well-recognized fine art that continues to occupy a place in today's art world. In this pioneering study, leading scholar Martha Drexler Lynn explores how and why this shift occurred by examining the pivotal period for the maturation of American studio ceramics. Lynn traces critical developments in ceramics education, exhibition, patronage, and technology from 1940 to 1979, as magazines dedicated to the practice appeared, institutional support flourished, audiences grew, and star artists emerged.

    The most in-depth history of American studio ceramics to date, this book is the first to fully explore the works of art alongside the societal trends that shaped them and the organizations that propelled the movement. Lynn considers the movement's fluctuation across geographic regions as well as stylistic responses to advances in technology and cultural influences from across the United States and abroad. Key patrons and practitioners such as Aileen Osborn Webb, Glen Lukens, Peter Voulkos, and Robert Arneson are featured alongside lesser-known figures. This groundbreaking volume illustrates how studio ceramics came to define itself and challenged the boundaries between fine art and craft. It will be a definitive resource on the movement for years to come.

  • The Bible for Children - From the Age of Gutenberg to the Present

    For more than five centuries, parents, teachers, and preachers in Europe and America have written and illustrated Bibles especially for children. These children's Bibles vary widely, featuring different stories, various interpretations, and markedly divergent illustrations, despite their common source. How children's Bibles differ, and why, is the subject of this groundbreaking book, the first to recognize children's Bibles as a distinct genre with its own literary, historical, and cultural significance.

    Comparing European and American children's Bibles, Ruth B. Bottigheimer reveals how the cultural standards and social attitudes of adults who tell Bible stories to children affect the selection and interpretation of Old and New Testament stories. She also analyzes many familiar Bible tales--for example, the parting of the Red Sea, the Garden of Eden, and the Crucifixion--to see what they tell us about the Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish societies that presented them to children. Bottigheimer finds that even disparate religious groups transformed Bible stories for their young according to a common pattern: stories initially stayed close to scriptural text, then troubling passages underwent revisions, and finally a thoroughgoing amendment of the story emerged. Numerous engaging illustrations throughout this book underscore the fascinating variety among children's Bibles of different eras and cultures.

  • Art of the Dogon: Selections from the Lester Wunderman Collection

    The sculpture of the Dogon people of Mali constitutes one of the richest artistic traditions of West Africa and is a highlight of the Metropolitan Museum's permanent collection of African art. This handsome book features sixty-three of the finest pieces of Dogon art collected by Lester Wunderman, several of which have been donated to the Museum's permanent collection. The text incorporates the most up-to-date research and thinking on the complex subject of ritual art and on the context in which Dogon sculpture was originally produced and used. Each piece has been especially photographed for this volume and is accompanied by a detailed discussion of its function, style, and significance. Also included are maps, a bibliography, and more than eighty photographs, some of them taken in the field by Eliot Elisofon and Lester Wunderman.
    (This title was originally published in 1987/88.)

  • Benjamin-Constant - Marvels and Mirages of Orientalism

    A leading Orientalist painter during the Third Republic in France, Jean-Joseph Benjamin-Constant was one of the great colourists of the period, and his work evokes the sights he had witnessed during his travels in Spain and Morocco, as well as reflecting the exotic contents of his studio. He was the creator of huge, architectural compositions, in which he set fierce-looking Moors and dispassionate odalisques. His history paintings, based on stories from the Bible and Byzantine history, were the culmination of his ventures into Orientalism, and his sparkling palette resulted in wonderfully chromatic and beautiful works. He also stands out as one of the era's great painters of decorative cycles, from his work in Paris at the Opera Comique and the Gare d'Orsay, to the Capitole in Toulouse. His reputation as a society portraitist, meanwhile, won him an international reputation among royalty and the aristocracy, particularly in England. Generously illustrated and written by an international team of specialists on late 19th-century French art, this is the first study to focus on this fascinating figure, offering new and unpublished research into the life of a famous yet today little-known artist and revealing him at work in his studio and at the Paris Salon, teaching at the Academie Julian and amidst the many foreign students and collectors who flocked round him.

  • If Mayors Ruled The World - Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities

    Can cities solve the biggest problems of the twenty-first century better than nations? Is the city democracy's best hope?

    In the face of the most perilous challenges of our time--climate change, terrorism, poverty, and trafficking of drugs, guns, and people--the nations of the world seem paralyzed. The problems are too big, too interdependent, too divisive for the nation-state. Is the nation-state, once democracy's best hope, today democratically dysfunctional? Obsolete? The answer, says Benjamin Barber in this highly provocative and original book, is yes. Cities and the mayors who run them can do and are doing a better job. Barber cites the unique qualities cities worldwide share: pragmatism, civic trust, participation, indifference to borders and sovereignty, and a democratic penchant for networking, creativity, innovation, and cooperation. He demonstrates how city mayors, singly and jointly, are responding to transnational problems more effectively than nation-states mired in ideological infighting and sovereign rivalries. Featuring profiles of a dozen mayors around the world--courageous, eccentric, or both at once--If Mayors Ruled the World presents a compelling new vision of governance for the coming century. Barber makes a persuasive case that the city is democracy's best hope in a globalizing world, and great mayors are already proving that this is so.

  • Captain Cook and the Pacific: Art, Exploration and Empire

    British Royal Navy Captain James Cook's voyages of exploration across and around the Pacific Ocean were a marvel of maritime achievement, and provided the first accurate map of the Pacific. The expeditions answered key scientific, economic, and geographic questions, and inspired some of the most influential images of the Pacific made by Europeans. Now readers can immerse themselves in the adventure through the collections of London's National Maritime Museum, which illuminate every aspect of the voyages: oil paintings of lush landscapes, scientific and navigational instruments, ship plans, globes, charts and maps, rare books and manuscripts, coins and medals, ethnographic material, and personal effects. Each artifact holds a story that sheds light on Captain Cook, the crews he commanded, and the effort's impact on world history. Showcasing one of the richest resources of Cook-related material in the world, this publication invites readers to engage with the extraordinary voyages--manifested in material culture--and their continuing significance today.

  • Dancing into Dreams - Maya Vase Painting to the IK′ Kingdom

    Dancing into Dreams explores 8th-century Maya vase painting of the Ik' kingdom, located in the tropical lowlands of present day Guatemala. Ik' vases are acclaimed for their naturalistic color, veristic portraiture, and calligraphic line. Their painted surfaces depict historical subject matter and often include the names of the artists and patrons, as well as hieroglyphic explanations of the portrayed events and vessel production. Collectively, such self-consciously historical works offer a precision and nuance, unparalleled in the ancient Americas, to the study of the role of art in elite society.

    Authoritative and accessible, this handsomely illustrated volume presents a history of Ik' vase painting and describes the dramatic scenes represented on the vases with compelling and historically accurate vignettes.

  • The Civil War and American Art

    A sweeping survey of the impact of the Civil War on American painting and photography in the 19th century

    The Civil War redefined America and forever changed American art. Its grim reality, captured through the new medium of photography, was laid bare. American artists could not approach the conflict with the conventions of European history painting, which glamorized the hero on the battlefield. Instead, many artists found ways to weave the war into works of art that considered the human narrative--the daily experiences of soldiers, slaves, and families left behind. Artists and writers wrestled with the ambiguity and anxiety of the Civil War and used landscape imagery to give voice to their misgivings as well as their hopes for themselves and the nation.

    This important book looks at the range of artwork created before, during, and following the war, in the years between 1852 and 1877. Author Eleanor Jones Harvey surveys paintings made by some of America's finest artists, including Frederic Church, Sanford Gifford, Winslow Homer, and Eastman Johnson, and photographs taken by George Barnard, Alexander Gardner, and Timothy H. O'Sullivan.

    Harvey examines American landscape and genre painting and the new medium of photography to understand both how artists made sense of the war and how they portrayed what was a deeply painful, complex period in American history. Enriched by firsthand accounts of the war by soldiers, former slaves, abolitionists, and statesmen, Harvey's research demonstrates how these artists used painting and photography to reshape American culture. Alongside the artworks, period voices (notably those of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman) amplify the anxiety and dilemmas of wartime America.

  • Islamism - What It Means for the Middle East and the World

    A political, social, and cultural battle is currently raging in the Middle East. On one side are the Islamists, those who believe Islam should be the region's primary identity. In opposition are nationalists, secularists, royal families, military establishments, and others who view Islamism as a serious threat to national security, historical identity, and a cohesive society. This provocative, vitally important work explores the development of the largest, most influential Islamic groups in the Middle East over the past century. Tarek Osman examines why political Islam managed to win successive elections and how Islamist groups in various nations have responded after ascending to power. He dissects the alliances that have formed among Islamist factions and against them, addressing the important issues of Islamism's compatibility with modernity, with the region's experiences in the twentieth century, and its impact on social contracts and minorities. He explains what Salafism means, its evolution, and connections to jihadist groups in the Middle East. Osman speculates on what the Islamists' prospects for the future will mean for the region and the rest of the world.

  • Making a Presence - F. Holland Day in Artistic Photography

    Boston photographer Fred Holland Day (1864-1933) first distinguished himself in literary circles--as a critic, bibliophile, and co-founder of the progressive publishing firm Copeland and Day--before turning to photography in the 1880s. By the turn of the century, he had established an international reputation as a leader in the Pictorialist movement, striving to gain acceptance for photography as a fine art.

    Day's work ranged from intimate portraits of friends and fellow artists, to elaborate, costume-driven self-portraiture, including his Jesus Christ series, photographed in rural settings near his home in Norwood, Massachusetts. Especially illuminating of Day's dual role as artist and advocate are the 50 plus images, reprised here, from a 1902 exhibition, in which Day posed for "leaders in the newer photographic methods" to demonstrate that the camera could be as expressive and sensitive an artistic tool as the brush or the etcher's needle.

    Making a Presence offers a dynamic composite portrait of an iconoclastic, independent artist, and of a man exquisitely expressive of his fin-de-siecle milieu.

  • Wagner and the Art of the Theatre

    The production of Wagner's operas is fiercely debated. In this groundbreaking stage history Patrick Carnegy vividly evokes the--often scandalous--great productions that have left their mark not only on our understanding of Wagner but on modern theatre as a whole. He examines the way in which Wagner himself staged his works, showing that the composer remained dissatisfied with even the best of his productions.
    After Wagner's death the scenic challenge was taken up by the Swiss visionary Adolphe Appia, by Gustav Mahler and Alfred Roller in Vienna, and by Otto Klemperer and Ewald Dulberg in Berlin. In Russia the Bolsheviks reinvented Wagner as a social revolutionary, while cinema left its indelible imprint on the Wagnerian stage with Eisenstein's Die Walkure in Moscow in 1940.
    Hitler famously appropriated Wagner for his own ends. Patrick Carnegy unscrambles the interaction of politics and stage production, describing how post-war German directors sought a way to bury the uncomfortable past. The book concludes with a critique of the iconoclastic interpretations by Patrice Chereau, Ruth Berghaus, and Hans-Jurgen Syberberg.

  • The Cloisters - Medieval Art and Architecture

    Home to an extraordinary collection of treasured masterworks, including the famed Unicorn Tapestries, The Cloisters is devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. This splendid new guide, published to celebrate The Cloisters' seventy-fifth anniversary, richly illustrates and describes the most important highlights of its collection, from paintings, illuminated manuscripts, and exquisitely carved ivories to its monumental architecture evocative of the grand religious spaces and domestic interiors of the Middle Ages. The Cloisters remains a testament to design innovation--a New York City landmark with sweeping views of the Hudson River--featuring original elements of Romanesque and Gothic architecture dating from the 12th through the 15th century. Three of the structures enclose beautiful gardens cultivated with species known from tapestries, medieval herbals, and other historic sources. These exotic spaces, the art masterpieces, and the fragrant plants offer visitors an oasis of serenity and inspiration. This book both encapsulates and enhances that experience.

  • John Singer Sargent - Figures and Landscapes 1908 -1913: The Complete Paintings, Volume VIII

    The penultimate volume of the acclaimed catalogue raisonne showcases paintings of some of Sargent's favorite places and people

    After John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) determined to curtail his internationally successful portrait practice, he had more freedom to paint where and what he wanted. Volume VIII of the John Singer Sargent catalogue raisonne transports us to the artist's most beloved locations, often with his friends and family. In the paintings featured here, Sargent returned to subjects that had always held deep personal connections and artistic challenges: mountains, streams, rocks and torrents, figures in repose, architecture and gardens, boats and shipping. He had known and painted the Alps since childhood, and his new Alpine studies make up the greatest number of works in this book.

    Beautifully designed, this volume represents a continuation in organization and presentation of the high standards that mark the series, and documents 299 works in oil and watercolor. Each painting is catalogued with full provenance, exhibition history, and bibliography. Wherever possible, works are illustrated in color; some are accompanied by related drawings and comparative studies by Sargent's fellow artists. Contemporary photographs pinpoint the places and views that Sargent painted.

  • Instituting Reform - The Social Museum of Harvard University, 1903-1931

    Harvard University's distinctive Social Museum was established in 1903 by Francis Greenwood Peabody (1847-1936) to "collect the social experience of the world as material for university teaching." The more than 5,000 photographs and graphic illustrations that survive, including works by Lewis Hine and Frances Benjamin Johnston, are now held by the Harvard Art Museums.

    Instituting Reform focuses an exacting lens on the Social Museum's history, motive, and meaning. Punctuated by generous portfolio sections, the book's five essays probe the museum's collection, using it as a case study to explore the early institutional uses of photographs as social documents, the systematization of exhibition display by reform organizations, and the role such institutions played in the formation of the modern research university. The museum promoted the study of philanthropic, social, and industrial progress through the inductive method of observation common in the sciences. As the authors demonstrate, however, the social "truths" made evident were strongly influenced by prevailing values and tensions of the Progressive Era.

  • Sol Lewitt - Structures, 1965-2005

    Sol LeWitt (1928-2007), renowned for his role in establishing Conceptualism and Minimalism as dominant art movements in the postwar era, is perhaps best known for his masterful and brilliantly colored wall drawings. Throughout his career, however, LeWitt also created many remarkable three-dimensional works suitable for display in outdoor settings. In this handsome publication, which accompanies the first major career survey of LeWitt's "structures," the artist's modular works are traced from their simplest manifestation in a single large-scale cube through multiple variations, with examples from the 1960s through the 1990s. Works from the 1980s onward explore the three-dimensional possibilities of diverse geometric forms, such as stars, and the introduction of new materials, including concrete block and fiberglass, stimulating experimentation with non-geometric, irregular forms on an increasing scale.

    The book includes essays by Nicholas Baume and Joe Madura that provide curatorial and critical context for the structures. Additional essays by Rachel Haidu, Anna Lovatt, and Kirsten Swenson offer fresh art-historical commentary, ranging from the problematic of site for LeWitt's initial structures to the relationship between abstract conceptual systems, architecture, and urban space. Also included is a never before published conversation among the artist, Baume, and Jonathan Flatley. Stunning color plates record the works on display in Lower Manhattan's City Hall Park, supplemented by archival and historical documentation.

  • The Rise of Female Kings in Europe, 1300-1800

    In this lively and pathbreaking book, William Monter sketches Europe's increasing acceptance of autonomous female rulers between the late Middle Ages and the French Revolution. Monter surveys the governmental records of Europe's thirty women monarchs - the famous (Mary Stuart, Elizabeth I, Catherine the Great) as well as the obscure (Charlotte of Cyprus, Isabel Clara Eugenia of the Netherlands) - describing how each of them achieved sovereign authority, wielded it, and (more often than men) abandoned it. Monter argues that Europe's female kings, who ruled by divine right, experienced no significant political opposition despite their gender.

  • Eva Hesse 1965

    In 1964, Eva Hesse and her husband Tom Doyle were invited by the industrialist Friedrich Arnhard Scheidt to a residency in Kettwig an der Ruhr, Germany. The following fifteen months marked a significant transformation in Hesse's practice. Eva Hesse 1965 brings together key drawings, paintings and reliefs from this short, yet pivotal period where the artist was able to rethink her approach to colour, materials, and her two-dimensional practice and begin moving towards sculpture, preparing herself for the momentous strides she would take upon her return to New York. Hesse's studio space was located in an abandoned textile factory in Germany. The building still contained machine parts, tools, and materials from its previous use and the angular forms of these disused machines and tools served as inspiration for Hesse's mechanical drawings and paintings. Sharp lines come together in these works to create complex and futuristic, yet nonsensical forms, which Hesse described in her writings as '... clean and clear - but crazy like machines'. Seeking a continuation of her mechanical drawings, in March of 1965, Hesse began a period of feverish work in which she made fourteen reliefs, which venture into three-dimensional space. Works such as 'H + H' (1965) and 'Oomamaboomba' (1965) are the material embodiment of her precisely linear mechanical drawings. Vibrant colours of gouache, varnish and tempera are built up using papier mache and objects Hesse found in the abandoned factory: wood, metal and cord, which was often left to hang, protruding from the picture plane. Exhibition from 30 January - 9 March 2013, Hauser & Wirth London, Savile Row.

  • Building After Auschwitz - Jewish Architecture and the Memory of the Holocaust

    The first major study to examine the rise to prominence of Jewish architects since 1945 and the connection of their work to the legacy of the Holocaust

    Since the end of World War II, Jewish architects have risen to unprecedented international prominence. Whether as modernists, postmodernists, or deconstructivists, architects such as Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, Louis I. Kahn, Daniel Libeskind, Richard Meier, Moshe Safdie, Robert A.M. Stern, and Stanley Tigerman have made pivotal contributions to postwar architecture. They have also decisively shaped Jewish architectural history, as many of their designs are influenced by Jewish themes, ideas, and imagery. Building After Auschwitz is the first major study to examine the origins of this "new Jewish architecture."

    Historian Gavriel D. Rosenfeld describes this cultural development as the result of important shifts in Jewish memory and identity since the Holocaust, and cites the rise of postmodernism, multiculturalism, and Holocaust consciousness as a catalyst. In showing how Jewish architects responded to the Nazi genocide in their work, Rosenfeld's study sheds new light on the evolution of Holocaust memory.

  • What Art is

    A lively meditation on the nature of art by one of America's most celebrated art critics

    What is it to be a work of art? Renowned author and critic Arthur C. Danto addresses this fundamental, complex question. Part philosophical monograph and part memoiristic meditation, What Art Is challenges the popular interpretation that art is an indefinable concept, instead bringing to light the properties that constitute universal meaning. Danto argues that despite varied approaches, a work of art is always defined by two essential criteria: meaning and embodiment, as well as one additional criterion contributed by the viewer: interpretation. Danto crafts his argument in an accessible manner that engages with both philosophy and art across genres and eras, beginning with Plato's definition of art in The Republic, and continuing through the progress of art as a series of discoveries, including such innovations as perspective, chiaroscuro, and physiognomy. Danto concludes with a fascinating discussion of Andy Warhol's famous shipping cartons, which are visually indistinguishable from the everyday objects they represent.

    Throughout, Danto considers the contributions of philosophers including Descartes, Kant, and Hegel, and artists from Michelangelo and Poussin to Duchamp and Warhol, in this far-reaching examination of the interconnectivity and universality of aesthetic production.

  • The Bet - Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth′s Future

    Are we headed for a world of scarce resources and environmental catastrophe, or will innovation and markets yield greater prosperity

    In 1980, the iconoclastic economist Julian Simon challenged celebrity biologist Paul Ehrlich to a bet. Their wager on the future prices of five metals captured the public's imagination as a test of coming prosperity or doom. Ehrlich, author of the landmark book The Population Bomb, predicted that rising populations would cause overconsumption, resource scarcity, and famine--with apocalyptic consequences for humanity. Simon optimistically countered that human welfare would flourish thanks to flexible markets, technological change, and our collective ingenuity. Simon and Ehrlich's debate reflected a deepening national conflict over the future of the planet. The Bet weaves the two men's lives and ideas together with the era's partisan political clashes over the environment and the role of government. In a lively narrative leading from the dawning environmentalism of the 1960s through the pivotal presidential contest between Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan and on into the 1990s, Paul Sabin shows how the fight between Ehrlich and Simon--between environmental fears and free-market confidence--helped create the gulf separating environmentalists and their critics today. Drawing insights from both sides, Sabin argues for using social values, rather than economic or biological absolutes, to guide society's crucial choices relating to climate change, the planet's health, and our own.

  • Anarchy & Beauty: William Morris and His Legacy, 1860-1960

    A beautifully illustrated portrayal of the life of the artist and writer who revolutionized Victorian society and whose legacy is still widely embraced today

    William Morris (1834-1896) was an artist, craftsman, designer, poet, polymath, and visionary thinker. Well known for advocating that objects of beauty be accessible to all, Morris had a tremendous impact on the British Socialist movement, the Arts and Crafts movement, the Garden City movement, as well as on successive generations of artists and thinkers in Britain and beyond. In this fascinating book, Fiona MacCarthy examines Morris's vision of a society in which art could flourish, and how this idea resonated over the ensuing century.
    Anarchy and Beauty takes the reader through Morris's fascinating career, from the establishment of his decorative arts shop (later Morris & Co.), to his radical sexual politics and libertarianism, and the publication in 1890 of his novel News from Nowhere, which envisions a utopian socialist society. MacCarthy then looks at the numerous artists and movements that bear the influence of Morris's ideas: Arts and Crafts and the Garden City, which took hold in both Europe and the United States; artists' communities that sprung up during the interwar years; and the 1951 Festival of Britain, whose mission was to bring the highest standards of design within the reach of everyone.

  • Piero Della Francesca - Personal Encounters

    This book tells the story of Italian Renaissance master Piero della Francesca (1411/13-1492) by focusing on four paintings he created over the span of his career. It also provides the first study of his small-scale devotional paintings, including the exquisite Saint Jerome and a Donor. One of today's most prominent scholars narrates the painting's mysterious history and uncovers new insights gleaned during its recent study and restoration. The authors explore the relationship between this painting and other works made by Piero for private devotion, including one of his last and most striking paintings, the magnificent Madonna di Senigallia. New research describes the complex relationships between Piero and his patrons and other contemporaries. This book brims with revelatory details about Piero's work that will intrigue both casual readers and devoted fans of the artist, and will form a gateway to a larger analysis of Piero's overall body of work.

  • Venice and Vitruvius - Reading Venice and Daniele Barbaro and Andrea Palladio

    In about 35-25 B.C.E., the Roman architect Vitruvius produced his encyclopedic ten-book summary of the principles of Hellenistic architecture, De architectura (On Architecture). These ideas have stimulated architects ever since. In the mid-16th century, the architect Andrea Palladio (1508-1580) and the humanist Daniele Barbaro (1513-1570) looked to the city of Venice in order to understand and interpret Vitruvius's text - still in need of clarification - which would enable them to solve contemporary architectural problems. They found in the city's medieval and Renaissance streets, palaces, churches, and towers living principles that enabled them to interpret the ancient principles. By 1556, Barbaro had incorporated their observations into his "Commentaries" on Vitruvius, and two distinctly new editions for different audiences followed a decade later.

    Margaret D'Evelyn has gathered evidence to document how Palladio's understanding of Vitruvius influenced Barbaro. This engrossing volume also charts the invention of the illustrated architectural book and how major architect-authors, such as Leon Battista Alberti and Sebastiano Serlio, contributed to its development - demonstrating how Vitruvius shaped the way the city of Venice was viewed.

  • The Incidental Steward - Reflections on Citizen Science

    A thoughtful citizen scientist contemplates our changing natural world and the value of stewardship

    A search for a radio-tagged Indiana bat roosting in the woods behind her house in New York's Hudson Valley led Akiko Busch to assorted other encounters with the natural world--local ecological monitoring projects, community-organized cleanup efforts, and data-driven citizen science research. Whether it is pulling up water chestnuts in the Hudson River, measuring beds of submerged aquatic vegetation, or searching out vernal pools, all are efforts that illuminate the role of ordinary citizens as stewards of place. In this elegantly written book, Busch highlights factors that distinguish twenty-first-century citizen scientists from traditional amateur naturalists: a greater sense of urgency, helpful new technologies, and the expanded possibilities of crowdsourcing.

    The observations here look both to precisely recorded data sheets and to the impressionistic marginalia, scribbled asides, and side roads that often attend such unpredictable outings. While not a primer on the prescribed protocols of citizen science, the book combines vivid natural history, a deep sense of place, and reflection about our changing world. Musing on the expanding potential of citizen science, the author celebrates today's renewed volunteerism and the opportunities it offers for regaining a deep sense of connection to place.

  • Patriotic Betrayal - The Inside Story of the CIA′s Secret Campaign to Enroll American Students in the Crusade Against Communism

    The previously untold true story of the CIA's clandestine use of American students as undercover operatives during the Cold War

    In 1967, CIA director Richard Helms had, as he would later recall, "one of my darkest days" when President Lyndon Johnson told him that the muckraking magazine Ramparts was about to expose one of the Agency's best-kept secrets: a covert project to enroll American students in the crusade against communism. Ramparts, however, had only a small part of the story of the CIA's two-decades-long effort to suborn the National Student Association. Patriotic Betrayal tells the rest of the tale, which reads like a John le Carre novel, filled with self-serving rationalizations, layers of duplicity, and bureaucratic double-talk.

    In this eye-opening book, Karen M. Paget, herself a former member of the NSA, mined hundreds of archival sources and declassified documents, and interviewed more than 150 people, to uncover precisely how the CIA turned the NSA into an intelligence asset during the Cold War, with students used--sometimes wittingly but usually unwittingly--as undercover agents inside America and abroad. A rich and suspenseful account of an under-examined episode in the Cold War, Patriotic Betrayal describes the relationship from its inception in 1947, when both the NSA and CIA were established, to 1967, when public exposure forced the CIA to discontinue the arrangement while successfully engineering a cover-up of the extent of its penetration into the NSA.

    For the first time, Paget tells the full story revealing that what began as a straightforward project to thwart perceived Soviet influence in America and abroad grew and diversified, and that intelligence-gathering and espionage--despite subsequent CIA denials--were integral to its nature.

    How did a domestic liberal student organization become, effectively, a covert arm of a secret government organization charged with advancing U.S. foreign policy aims? The answer throws a sharp light on the persistent argument, heard even today, about whether America's national-security interests can be secured by skullduggery and deception. Patriotic Betrayal is an indispensable history of the dark side of Cold War good intentions and fills a significant gap in an important era of postwar twentieth-century history.

  • Web Style Guide: Foundations of User Experience Design

    A classic reference book on user interface design and graphic design for web sites, updated to reflect a rapidly changing market

    Consistently praised as the best volume on classic elements of web site design, Web Style Guide has sold many thousands of copies and has been published around the world. This new revised edition confirms Web Style Guide as the go-to authority in a rapidly changing market. As web designers move from building sites from scratch to using content management and aggregation tools, the book's focus shifts away from code samples and toward best practices, especially those involving mobile experience, social media, and accessibility. An ideal reference for web site designers in corporations, government, nonprofit organizations, and academic institutions, the book explains established design principles and covers all aspects of web design--from planning to production to maintenance. The guide also shows how these principles apply in web design projects whose primary concerns are information design, interface design, and efficient search and navigation.

  • Mechanical Smile - Modernism and the First Fashion Shows in France and America, 1900-1929.

    A superlative study of the roots of the modern fashion show

    In the early 20th century, the desire to see clothing in motion flourished on both sides of the Atlantic: models tangoed, slithered, swaggered, and undulated before customers in couture houses and department stores. The Mechanical Smile traces the history of the earliest fashion shows in France and the United States from their origins in the 1880s to 1929, situating them in the context of modernism and the rationalization of the body. Fashion shows came into being concurrently with film, and this book explores the connections between fashion and early cinema, which arguably functioned as what Walter Benjamin called "new velocities"--forces that altered the rhythms of modern life.

    Using significant new archival evidence, The Mechanical Smile shows how so-called "mannequin parades" employed the visual language of modernism to translate business and management methods into visual seduction. Caroline Evans, a leading fashion historian, argues for an expanded definition of modernism as both gestural and performative, drawing on literary and performance theory rather than relying on art and design history. The fashion show, Evans posits, is a singular nodal point where the disparate histories of commerce, modernism, gender, and the body converge.

  • Touching Objects - Intimate Experiences of Italian Fifteen-century Art

    This groundbreaking book spans the fields of art history, material culture, and gender studies in its examination of a range of objects from Italian Renaissance society. Addressing painted and sculpted portraits, marriage and betrothal gifts, and paxes, Adrian W. B. Randolph uses themes such as family and individual memory, windows, perspectival space, and touch to investigate how these items were experienced at the time, particularly by women. Rather than focusing on the social contexts of the objects, this original study deals with the objects themselves, asking how individuals lived with, looked at, and responded to complex things that at the time hovered between the nascent category of art and the everyday. Accompanied by beautiful and engaging accounts and illustrations of late-14th- and 15th-century Italian art, this compelling and thought-provoking argument makes the case for an alternate account of art and experience that challenges many conceptions about Renaissance art.

  • Anthony Friedkin - The Gay Essay

    An unprecedented look at a moving photographic series that chronicles the gay communities of Los Angeles and San Francisco from 1969 to 1972

    For more than forty years, American photographer Anthony Friedkin (b. 1949), creating full-frame black-and-white images, has documented people, cities, and landscapes primarily in his home state of California. During the culturally tumultuous years of 1969 and 1970, Friedkin made a series of photographs that together offer an eloquent and expressive visual chronicle of the gay communities of Los Angeles and San Francisco at the time. This is the first book to explore the series, titled The Gay Essay, in depth, within the broader historical context that gave rise to it.

    1969 witnessed the Stonewall riots in New York City and was a turning point in the history of community building and organized political activism among homosexuals in the United States. The Gay Essay provides a singular, intimate record of this crucial moment. Friedkin's portraits, taken in streets, hotels, bars, and dancehalls, demonstrate a sensitivity and an understanding that has imbued the photographs with an enduring resonance. This handsome book features seventy-five full-page plates and is accompanied by engaging essays and a poem by Eileen Myles.

  • Apocalyptic Realm - Jihad in South Asia

    This hard hitting and timely book explores the roots of militant Islam in South Asia and how it has grown to become a source of profound global alarm. Dilip Hiro tracks the growth of the jihadist movement from its first violent activities in Afghanistan in 1980 to the present day, challenging previous understandings of the roles of the main players in the region - Afghanistan, Pakistan, the U.S., India, and the Soviet Union - and warning that the Line of Control in Kashmir, where jihadists seek to incite war between Pakistan and India, is today the most dangerous border in the world. With evidence from a full range of sources including newly released Kremlin archives and classified U.S. Embassy documents published by WikiLeaks, the author compiles the first complete and accurate history of Islamist terrorism throughout South Asia. He chronicles the historic links among Pakistan, Afghanistan, and India and sets forth their varying degrees of destabilization at the hands of the jihadists. He sheds fascinating light on such topics as the Al-Qaeda/Taliban alliance while also providing a broad analysis of the impact of international ambitions in the region. Compact, comprehensive, and fast-paced, this book lays bare the causes of today's escalating terrorist threat, corrects historical misunderstandings, and discusses fresh possibilities for breaking the hold of jihadi extremism.

  • The Flemish Merchant of Venice - Daniel Nijs and the Sale of the Gonzaga Art Collection

    During the years 1627 and 1628, Charles I of England purchased the cream of the Gonzaga art collection, belonging to the dukes of Mantua, in what would become the greatest art deal of the 17th century. Among the treasures sold were ancient statues and stunning paintings by Titian, Raphael, Correggio, and Rubens. This book examines this fascinating and significant art sale from the perspective of the man who orchestrated it-Daniel Nijs (1572-1647), a Flemish merchant, collector, and dealer living in Venice. Christina M. Anderson brings Nijs to life, asserting that he was more than the avaricious and unscrupulous trader that most modern writers and scholars deem him to be. Anderson's evocative text describes Nijs's unique talent as a dealer, rooted in superior commercial skills, connections to artistic and diplomatic circles, and a deep love of art. The narrative reveals that Nijs was ultimately the pivotal figure involved with the Gonzaga sale, though also-when he later fell into bankruptcy and dishonor due to a deal gone awry-the most tragic.

  • The Search for Immortality - Tomb Treasures of Han China

    The Han dynasty was the first to forge a stable empire governing all of China. It ruled during a golden age that shaped much of the nation's cultural history and development. In an effort to preserve their legacy of beauty and power, the Han created elaborate tombs containing exquisite artistic treasures intended for use in the afterlife. The finest of these treasures to have survived include exquisite jades, bronzes, and ceramics, found in the tombs of the Han imperial family and of a rival "emperor" of Nanyue.

    Many of the items, including warrior statues, dancing figures, and priceless jewels--intended to ensure protection, entertainment, and continued wealth and status, respectively--are brought together for the first time in this stunning publication. Featuring newly commissioned photography and essays by leading scholars, this sumptuously illustrated catalogue presents a ground-breaking account of the finest treasures from the Han dynasty.

  • The Buddha in the Machine - Art, Technology, and the Meeting of East and West

    The famous 1893 Chicago World's Fair celebrated the dawn of corporate capitalism and a new Machine Age with an exhibit of the world's largest engine. Yet the noise was so great, visitors ran out of the Machinery Hall to retreat to the peace and quiet of the Japanese pavilion's Buddhist temples and lotus ponds. Thus began over a century of the West's turn toward an Asian aesthetic as an antidote to modern technology.

    From the turn-of-the-century Columbian Exhibition to the latest Zen-inspired designs of Apple, Inc., R. John Williams charts the history of our embrace of Eastern ideals of beauty to counter our fear of the rise of modern technological systems. In a dazzling work of synthesis, Williams examines Asian influences on book design and department store marketing, the commercial fiction of Jack London, the poetic technique of Ezra Pound, the popularity of Charlie Chan movies, the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, and the design of the latest high-tech gadgets. Williams demonstrates how, rather than retreating from modernity, writers, artists, and inventors turned to traditional Eastern techne as a therapeutic means of living with--but never abandoning--Western technology.

  • Pevsner′s Architectural Glossary

    This is the essential companion to the terms used in the Pevsner Architectural Guides. Pevsners famous designations E. E. and Perp. are among the terms clearly explained in this informative glossary drawn from the vocabulary of the Buildings of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland volumes. And anyone who has wondered how a headstop relates to a hoodmould or what a squich looks like will find their understanding and enjoyment of architecture enhanced by knowledge of its components, styles and ornament. To name is to know and beginners will soon find that familiarity with the names quickly helps them understand the similarities and differences between the buildings and styles they see. At the same time, the breadth of the fields covered will be useful even to experts. Many of the entries are supported by line drawings specially commissioned for the series, and photographic sections provide an attractive sequence illustrating stylistic developments in both religious and secular architecture. This clear and practical primer to looking at all the elements of buildings will enliven any architectural exploration.

  • The Nostalgia Factory - Memory, Time and Ageing

    You cannot call to mind the name of a man you have known for 30 years. You walk into a room and forget what you came for. What is the name of that famous film you ve watched so many times? These are common experiences, and as we grow older we tend to worry about these lapses. Is our memory failing? Is it dementia? Douwe Draaisma, a renowned memory specialist, here focuses on memory in later life. Writing with eloquence and humor, he explains neurological phenomena without becoming lost in specialist terminology. His book is reminiscent of Oliver Sacks s work, and not coincidentally this volume includes a long interview with Sacks, who speaks of his own memory changes as he entered his sixties. Draaisma moves smoothly from anecdote to research and back, weaving stories and science into a compelling description of the terrain of memory. He brings to light the reminiscence effect, just one of the unexpected pleasures of an aging memory. The author writes reassuringly about forgetfulness and satisfyingly dismantles the stubborn myth that mental gymnastics can improve memory. He presents a convincing case in favor of the aging mind and urges us to value the nostalgia that survives as recollection, appreciate the intangible nature of past events, and take pleasure in the consolation of razor-sharp reminiscing."

  • Wasteland - A History

    In Wasteland, Vittoria Di Palma takes on the "anti-picturesque," offering an account of landscapes that have traditionally drawn fear and contempt. Di Palma argues that a convergence of beliefs, technologies, institutions, and individuals in 18th-century England resulted in the formulation of cultural attitudes that continue to shape the ways we evaluate landscape today. Staking claims on the aesthetics of disgust, she addresses how emotional response has been central to the development of ideas about nature, beauty, and sublimity. With striking illustrations reaching back to the 1600s--husbandry manuals, radical pamphlets, gardening treatises, maps, and landscape paintings-- Wasteland spans the fields of landscape studies, art and architectural history, geography, history, and the history of science and technology. In stirring prose, Di Palma tackles our conceptions of such hostile territories as swamps, mountains, and forests, arguing that they are united not by any essential physical characteristics but by the aversive reactions they inspire.

  • Stieglitz, Steichen, Strand - Masterworks from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946), Edward Steichen (1879-1973), and Paul Strand (1890-1976) are among the most famous photographers of the 20th century. This handsome volume showcases for the first time The Metropolitan Museums extraordinarily rich holdings of works by these diverse and groundbreaking masters. A passionate advocate for photography and modern art promoted through his Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession (also known as 291) and his sumptuous journal Camera Work, Stieglitz was also a photographer of supreme accomplishment. Featured works by Stieglitz include portraits, landscapes, city views, and cloud studies, along with photographs from Stieglitzs composite portrait of Georgia OKeeffe (selected by OKeeffe herself for the Museum). Perhaps best known as a fashion photographer, celebrity portraitist, and MoMA curator, Steichen was, at the turn of the century, Stieglitzs man in Paris, gallery collaborator, and most talented exemplar of Photo-Secessionist photography. Steichens three large variant prints of The Flatiron and his moonlit photographs of Rodins Balzac are highlighted here. Marking a pivotal moment in the course of photography, the final issue of Camera Work (1916) was devoted to the young Paul Strand, whose photographs from 1915 and 1916 treated three principal themes - movement in the city, abstractions, and street portraits - and pioneered a shift from the soft-focus Pictorialist aesthetic to the straight approach and graphic power of an emerging modernism. This book reproduces Strands rare large platinum prints, most of them unique exhibition prints of images popularly known only as Camera Work photogravures. The rarely exhibited masterpieces gathered together in Stieglitz, Steichen, Strand are among the crown jewels of the Metropolitans photography collection.

  • Fire and Sand - Ancient Glass in the Collection of the Princeton University Art Museum

    For the first time, this important volume features nearly all of the ancient glass objects in the collection of the Princeton University Art Museum. Collected over the course of more than a century, the objects originate from locations across the eastern Mediterranean region. Taken together, the 509 ancient glass vessels and plaques provide a timeline of archaeological and cultural history from the middle of the second millennium B.C. to the rise of Islam in the 7th century.

    An introductory essay by award-winning scholar Anastassios Antonaras summarizes the history of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine glass, with a special emphasis on people--workers, artisans, owners, and vendors--and on the processes they used to create and decorate these artifacts. Conveniently arranged according to production technique, each entry in Fire and Sand features a color photograph, ink drawing, and detailed description.

  • Raphael's Tapestries: The Grotesques of Leo X

    Around 1515, Raphael (1483-1520) designed a set of tapestries for Leo X, the first Medici pope. Each was sumptuously woven in gold, silver, and silk, and depicted scenes from classical mythology with inventive grotesques. Now lost, these spectacular, grand-scale textiles are reconstructed in Raphael's Tapestries and set among a series of unprecedented decorative projects that Pope Leo commissioned from the artist. Likely produced by the Brussels weaver Pieter van Aelst, the tapestries pioneered a new all'antica style analogous with contemporary painted and sculpted interior programs. Tapestries played a central role at Leo's court, as spectacle and as propaganda, and the Grotesques of Leo X would inform tapestry design for the next three centuries. Their beauty and complexity rivaled those of contemporary painting, and their luxurious materials made them highly prized. With this new study, the Grotesques take their rightful place as Renaissance masterworks and as documents of the fervent humanist culture of early 16th-century Rome.

  • Music for Silenced Voices - Shostakovich and His Fifteen Quartets

    A new biography of Shostakovich that views him through the intimate music of his string quartets

    Most previous books about Dmitri Shostakovich have focused on either his symphonies and operas, or his relationship to the regime under which he lived, or both, since these large-scale works were the ones that attracted the interest and sometimes the condemnation of the Soviet authorities. Music for Silenced Voices looks at Shostakovich through the back door, as it were, of his fifteen quartets, the works which his widow characterized as a "diary, the story of his soul." The silences and the voices were of many kinds, including the political silencing of adventurous writers, artists, and musicians during the Stalin era; the lost voices of Shostakovich's operas (a form he abandoned just before turning to string quartets); and the death-silenced voices of his close friends, to whom he dedicated many of these chamber works.

    Wendy Lesser has constructed a fascinating narrative in which the fifteen quartets, considered one at a time in chronological order, lead the reader through the personal, political, and professional events that shaped Shostakovich's singular, emblematic twentieth-century life. Weaving together interviews with the composer's friends, family, and colleagues, as well as conversations with present-day musicians who have played the quartets, Lesser sheds new light on the man and the musician. One of the very few books about Shostakovich that is aimed at a general rather than an academic audience, Music for Silenced Voices is a pleasure to read; at the same time, it is rigorously faithful to the known facts in this notoriously complicated life. It will fill readers with the desire to hear the quartets, which are among the most compelling and emotionally powerful monuments of the past century's music.

  • Tutankhamun′s Funeral

    In 1907, more than a decade before the discovery of Tutankhamuns tomb, archaeologists unearthed remains from the mummification and funeral of the pharaoh, who ruled ancient Egypt in the 14th century B.C.. Now in the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, these materials provide physical evidence of burial rites of the now-legendary king, who is making headlines once again after new scientific investigations to determine the cause of his early death. Tutankhamun's Funeral includes a classic text written in 1941 by Herbert E. Winlock, one of the early 20th centurys leading Egyptologists, featuring in-depth analysis of the objects and their significance. In addition, an introduction and appendix by Dorothea Arnold update the findings with recent scholarship. The book is illustrated throughout with new colour photography as well as many historical images and drawings.

  • Sin - A History

    What is sin? Is it simply wrongdoing? Why do its effects linger over time? In this sensitive, imaginative, and original work, Gary Anderson shows how changing conceptions of sin and forgiveness lay at the very heart of the biblical tradition. Spanning nearly two thousand years, the book brilliantly demonstrates how sin, once conceived of as a physical burden, becomes, over time, eclipsed by economic metaphors. Transformed from a weight that an individual carried, sin becomes a debt that must be repaid in order to be redeemed in Gods eyes. Anderson shows how this ancient Jewish revolution in thought shaped the way the Christian church understood the death and resurrection of Jesus and eventually led to the development of various penitential disciplines, deeds of charity, and even papal indulgences. In so doing it reveals how these changing notions of sin provided a spur for the Protestant Reformation. Broad in scope while still exceptionally attentive to detail, this ambitious and profound book unveils one of the most seismic shifts that occurred in religious belief and practice, deepening our understanding of one of the most fundamental aspects of human experience. Winner of the 2010 Christianity Today Book Award in the Biblical Studies category sponsored by Christianity Today International.

  • Life′s Blueprint - The Science and Art of Embryo Creation

    A uniquely accessible way of looking at recent major advances in the science of embryonic development

    In the span of just three decades, scientific understanding of the formation of embryos has undergone a major revolution. The implications of these new research findings have an immediate bearing on human health and future therapies, yet most nonscientists remain quite unaware of the exciting news.

    In this engaging book, a distinguished geneticist offers a clear, jargon-free overview of the field of developmental biology. Benny Shilo transforms complicated scientific paradigms into understandable ideas, employing an array of photographic images to demonstrate analogies between the cells of an embryo and human society. Shilo's innovative approach highlights important concepts in a way that will be intuitive and resonant with readers' own experiences.

    The author explains what is now known about the mechanisms of embryonic development and the commanding role of genes. For each paradigm under discussion, he provides both a scientific image and a photograph he has taken in the human world. These pairs of images imply powerful metaphors, such as the similarities between communication among cells and among human beings, or between rules embedded in the genome and laws that govern human society. The book concludes with a glimpse of promising future possibilities, including the generation of tissues and organs for use as "spare parts."

  • Katun - A Crime Without Punishment

    The first collection of Russian documents in English on the Soviet massacre of Polish prisoners of war in 1940 and the fifty-year cover-up that followed

    The 14,500 Polish army officers, police, gendarmes, and civilians taken prisoner by the Red Army when it invaded eastern Poland in September 1939 were held in three special NKVD camps and executed at three different sites in spring 1940, of which the one in Katyn Forest is the most famous. Another 7,300 prisoners held in NKVD jails in Ukraine and Belarus were also shot at this time, although many others disappeared without trace. The murder of these Poles is among the most monstrous mass murders undertaken by any modern government. Three leading historians of the NKVD massacres of Polish prisoners of war at Katyn, Kharkov, and Tver--now subsumed under "Katyn"--present 122 documents selected from the published Russian and Polish volumes coedited by Natalia S. Lebedeva and Wojciech Materski. The documents, with introductions and notes by Anna M. Cienciala, detail the Soviet killings, the elaborate cover-up, the admission of the truth, and the Katyn question in Soviet/Russian-Polish relations up to the present.

  • Defiance of the Patriots

    An evocative and enthralling account of a defining event in American history

    This thrilling book tells the full story of the an iconic episode in American history, the Boston Tea Party--exploding myths, exploring the unique city life of eighteenth-century Boston, and setting this audacious prelude to the American Revolution in a global context for the first time. Bringing vividly to life the diverse array of people and places that the Tea Party brought together--from Chinese tea-pickers to English businessmen, Native American tribes, sugar plantation slaves, and Boston's ladies of leisure--Benjamin L. Carp illuminates how a determined group of New Englanders shook the foundations of the British Empire, and what this has meant for Americans since. As he reveals many little-known historical facts and considers the Tea Party's uncertain legacy, he presents a compelling and expansive history of an iconic event in America's tempestuous past.

  • Absence of Mind

    One of our best contemporary writers explores the tension between science and religion and reveals how our concept of mind determines how we understand and value human nature and human civilization

    In this ambitious book, acclaimed writer Marilynne Robinson applies her astute intellect to some of the most vexing topics in the history of human thought--science, religion, and consciousness. Crafted with the same care and insight as her award-winning novels, Absence of Mind challenges postmodern atheists who crusade against religion under the banner of science. In Robinson's view, scientific reasoning does not denote a sense of logical infallibility, as thinkers like Richard Dawkins might suggest. Instead, in its purest form, science represents a search for answers. It engages the problem of knowledge, an aspect of the mystery of consciousness, rather than providing a simple and final model of reality.

    By defending the importance of individual reflection, Robinson celebrates the power and variety of human consciousness in the tradition of William James. She explores the nature of subjectivity and considers the culture in which Sigmund Freud was situated and its influence on his model of self and civilization. Through keen interpretations of language, emotion, science, and poetry, Absence of Mind restores human consciousness to its central place in the religion-science debate.

  • Persuasion and Rhetoric

    This is the first translation of a powerful work in modern Italian philosophy and rhetoric, a work that develops Nietzschean themes and anticipates the conclusions of, among others, Martin Heidegger. Written in 1910, it is a deeply personal book, reflecting the young author's struggle to make sense of modern life.

  • Windows on the War - Soviet TASS Posters at Home and Abroad, 1941-1945

    'Windows on the War' is a groundbreaking publication - the first in English to focus on posters designed by the Soviet Union's 'TASS' news agency to bolster support for the Soviet war effort. 'TASS' posters were created by a large collective of Soviet writers, printers and artists, including such notables as Mikhail Cheremnykh, Nikolai Denisovskii, the Kukryniksy and Pavel Sokolov-Skalia. Often six feet tall and always striking and bold, these stenciled posters were printed and placed daily in windows for the public to see. They were also sent abroad to serve as international cultural 'ambassadors', rallying Allied and neutral nations to the Soviet cause. Drawn from the Art Institute of Chicago's collection as well as other private and public holdings, these 'TASS' posters have not been seen since World War II. An international team of scholars presents the 'TASS' posters both as unique historical objects and as artworks that reveal how preeminent artists of the day used unconventional technical and visual means to contribute to the war effort, marking a major chapter in the history of design and propaganda. Generously illustrated, the book presents photographs, documentary materials and memorabilia in meaningful juxtapositions with images of the 'TASS' posters. Also included are documents illuminating the expression of Russian cultural life in the United States during the war, opening a fascinating window on to the war along the Eastern Front and the development of this remarkable aesthetic genre.

  • Flaubert′s ′Gueuloir′- On Madame Bovary and Salammbo

    A leading art critic and historian offers a new and revolutionary analysis of Flaubert's literary style

    Gustave Flaubert, one of the key figures in literary modernism, is famous for his determined pursuit of stylistic perfection. This notably involved the attempt to eliminate from his prose all sorts of assonances, consonances, and repetitions, in large measure by reading his sentences in a loud voice--the test of what he called the gueuloir (from gueuler, to yell). And yet when one examines closely the prose in his first novel, Madame Bovary, one becomes aware of a host of repetitions that appear to go directly against his stylistic ideal, revealing a level of "resistance" to that ideal at the very heart of his writing process.

    In this book Michael Fried presents two long essays: the first on Madame Bovary, in which the problem of critical understanding posed by this discovery is explored in depth; and the second on Flaubert's remarkable second novel, Salammbo, in which the conflict between the drive for perfection and certain automatistic tendencies in Madame Bovary is replaced by a determination to extend the rule of authorial will throughout every aspect and level of the text. Furthermore, drawing on his wide knowledge of nineteenth-century French painting and criticism, Fried suggests that there exist strong analogies between what goes on in Flaubert's writing and what can be seen to take place in the art of Courbet, Manet, and Legros.

  • Thinking in Circles - An Essay on Ring Composition

    Many famous antique texts are misunderstood and many others have been completely dismissed, all because the literary style in which they were written is unfamiliar today. So argues Mary Douglas in this controversial study of ring composition, a technique which places the meaning of a text in the middle, framed by a beginning and ending in parallel. To read a ring composition in the modern linear fashion is to misinterpret it, Douglas contends, and todays scholars must reevaluate important antique texts from around the world. Found in the Bible and in writings from as far afield as Egypt, China, Indonesia, Greece, and Russia, ring composition is too widespread to have come from a single source. Does it perhaps derive from the way the brain works? What is its function in social contexts? The author examines ring composition, its principles and functions, in a cross-cultural way. She focuses on ring composition in Homers Iliad, the Bibles book of Numbers, and, for a challenging modern example, Laurence Sternes Tristram Shandy, developing a persuasive argument for reconstruing famous books and rereading neglected ones.

  • Dignity - The Essential Role it Plays in Resolving Conflict

    The first comprehensive exploration of dignity, its role in human conflict, and its power to improve relationships of all kinds

    The desire for dignity is universal and powerful. It is a motivating force behind all human interaction--in families, in communities, in the business world, and in relationships at the international level. When dignity is violated, the response is likely to involve aggression, even violence, hatred, and vengeance. On the other hand, when people treat one another with dignity, they become more connected and are able to create more meaningful relationships. Surprisingly, most people have little understanding of dignity, observes Donna Hicks in this important book. She examines the reasons for this gap and offers a new set of strategies for becoming aware of dignity's vital role in our lives and learning to put dignity into practice in everyday life.

    Drawing on her extensive experience in international conflict resolution and on insights from evolutionary biology, psychology, and neuroscience, the author explains what the elements of dignity are, how to recognize dignity violations, how to respond when we are not treated with dignity, how dignity can restore a broken relationship, why leaders must understand the concept of dignity, and more. Hicks shows that by choosing dignity as a way of life, we open the way to greater peace within ourselves and to a safer and more humane world for all.

  • Tales of a Severed Head

    A brilliant retelling of the classic Arab tale of Scheherazade, set in the present day

    This volume brings Moroccan poet Rachida Madani's remarkable poems to English-language readers for the first time. In Tales of a Severed Head, Madani addresses present-day issues surrounding the role of women in society--issues not unlike those explored a thousand years ago in the enduring collection of Arab tales known as The Thousand and One Nights.

    In the ancient tales, the insanely distrustful King Shehriyar vows to marry a new wife each night and have her beheaded the next morning, thus eliminating the risk of being cuckolded. Through the courage and wit of young Scheherazade, who volunteers to be the king's bride and then invents the legendary tales that go on for a thousand and one nights, Shehriyar is healed of his obsession and the kingdom's virgins are saved. Like her brave-hearted predecessor, Madani's modern-day Scheherazade is fighting for her own life as well as the lives of her fellow sufferers. But in today's world, the threat comes as much from poverty, official corruption, the abuse of human rights, and the lingering effects of colonialism as from the power wielded by individual men. Madani weaves a tale of contemporary resistance, and once again language provides a potent weapon.

  • Monet/Kelly

    Early in his career, Ellsworth Kelly (b. 1923) spent six formative years (1948-54) in France, where he discovered the late work of the Impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926). Visits to the remote island of Belle-Ile off the coast of Brittany in 1949 and a visit to Monet's house and studio in Giverny in 1952 inspired a series of drawings, as well as Kelly's first monochrome work, Tableau Vert. Kelly returned to France on subsequent journeys in 1965, 2000, and 2005, visiting Belle-Ile again and Provence, continuing to draw motifs depicted by Monet, as well as by Cezanne and Matisse. This publication includes two paintings and eighteen unpublished drawings by Kelly, bringing them together with nine paintings by Monet from his Belle-Ile series and from his garden in Giverny. All the works have been selected by Ellsworth Kelly himself. Essays by Yve-Alain Bois and Sarah Lees explore the significance of Kelly's work from this key moment in his career and the significance of the later paintings of Monet.

  • Etruscan Art - In the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    This informative and engaging book on the Museum's outstanding collection of Etruscan art also provides an introduction to the fascinating and diverse culture of ancient Etruria, which thrived in central Italy from about 900 to 100 B.C. Masterpieces of the collection include 7th century B.C. objects from the Monteleone di Spoleto tomb group (including the famous remarkably well-preserved bronze chariot), intricate gold jewelry, carved gems, and wonderful ambers. For the first time in more than 70 years, this incredible body of work is published in a comprehensive and beautifully designed book that draws upon decades of exhaustive research.

    Etruscan Art opens with short histories of pre-Roman Italy, Etruscan Studies, and the Metropolitan's collection, followed by chronological analyses of tomb groups, types of objects, and individual objects. The closing section features forgeries, pastiches, and objects of uncertain authenticity, all previously thought to be genuine. Richard Daniel De Puma, one of the foremost experts on Etruscan art, provides an invaluable new contribution to the study of ancient Italy.

  • Pomp and Poverty - A History of Silk in Ireland

    Lustrous, warm, lightweight, strong, silk has always been a symbol of wealth and status, beginning in prehistoric China. In Pomp and Poverty: A History of Silk in Ireland, Mairead Dunlevy unfolds a colourful tale. She introduces us to the merchants or 'silk men' who traded in silk, oversaw its production and invested in machinery and design; the weavers and dyers who created luxury under exploitative conditions for miserable wages; the gentlefolk and aristocracy who indulged in this expensive fabric as a signifier of wealth and taste. Irish legend credits 17th century French Huguenots with introducing the industry, but this book reveals that silk was woven in Ireland long before that, possibly from the tenth century. Dunlevy also details the development of poplin, a uniquely Irish silk product found in every royal court of 19th century Europe.

  • The Great War Seen from the Air -In Flanders Feilds, 1914-1918

    A remarkable photographic record of World War One, its relentless progression and the destruction it wrought, as seen from the skies above Flanders Fields

    Aerial photography was a relatively new technology at the onset of World War I and was embraced as an indispensable tool of wartime intelligence by all nations involved in the conflict. As a result, thousands of photographs taken from the air over the battlefields of the Great War have survived in archives throughout Europe, Australia, and the United States. These pictures present the war from a unique perspective, clearly showing the developing trench system, artillery batteries, bunkers, railway lines, airfields, medical evacuation routes, and more. They reveal the expanding war in Flanders Fields as the hostilities spread, kilometer by kilometer, devastating the environment and resulting in the complete destruction of the landscape at the front.

    This illuminating volume, the results of a collaboration between the In Flanders Fields Museum, Ypres, the Imperial War Museum, London, and the Royal Army Museum, Brussels, features hundreds of photographic case studies, illustrating in unprecedented detail the physical extent of World War I and the shocking environmental damage it left in its wake. Supplementing aerial images with maps, documents, and photos taken from the ground, this one-of-a-kind visual record stands as an important contribution to World War I history, revealing the wartime landscape of Flanders Fields as rarely seen before.

  • Adonis

    The first major career-spanning collection of the poems of Adonis, widely acknowledged as the most important poet working in Arabic today

    Born in Syria in 1930, Adonis is one of the most celebrated poets of the Arabic-speaking world. His poems have earned international acclaim, and his influence on Arabic literature has been likened to that of T. S. Eliot's on English-language verse. This volume serves as the first comprehensive survey of Adonis's work, allowing English readers to admire the arc of a remarkable literary career through the labors of the poet's own handpicked translator, Khaled Mattawa.

    Experimental in form and prophetic in tone, Adonis's poetry sings exultantly of both the sweet promise of eros and the lingering problems of the self. Steeped in the anguish of exile and the uncertainty of existence, Adonis demonstrates the poet's profound affection for Arabic and European lyrical traditions even as his poems work to destabilize those very aesthetic and moral sensibilities. This collection positions the work of Adonis within the pantheon of the great poets of exile, including Cesar Vallejo, Joseph Brodsky, and Paul Celan, providing for English readers the most complete vision yet of the work of the man whom the cultural critic Edward Said called "today's most daring and provocative Arab poet."

  • Vermeer′s Women - Secrets and Silence

    Centring on the extraordinary "Lacemaker" from the Musee du Louvre, this beautiful book investigates the subtle and enigmatic paintings by Johannes Vermeer that celebrate the intimacy of the Dutch household. Moments frozen in paint that reveal young women sewing, reading or playing musical instruments, captured in Vermeer's uniquely luminous style, recreate a silent and often mysterious domestic realm, closed to the outside world, and inhabited almost exclusively by women and children. Three internationally recognized experts in the field explain why women engaged in mundane domestic tasks, or in pleasurable pastimes such as music making, writing letters, or adjusting their toilette, comprise some of the most popular Dutch paintings of the seventeenth century. Among the most intriguing of these compositions are those that consciously avoid any engagement with the viewer. Rather than acknowledging our presence, figures avert their gazes or turn their backs upon us; they stare moodily into space or focus intently on the activities at hand. In viewing these paintings, we have the impression that we have stumbled upon a private world kept hidden from casual regard. The ravishingly beautiful paintings of Vermeer are perhaps the most poetic evocations of this secretive world, but other Dutch painters sought to imbue simple domestic scenes with an air of silent mystery, and the book features also works by some of the most important masters of seventeenth-century Dutch genre painting, among them Gerard ter Borch, Gerrit Dou, Pieter de Hooch, Nicolaes Maes, and Jan Steen.

  • Political Philosophy

    Who ought to govern? Why should I obey the law? How should conflict be controlled? What is the proper education for a citizen and a statesman? These questions probe some of the deepest and most enduring problems that every society confronts, regardless of time and place. Today we ask the same crucial questions about law, authority, justice, and freedom that Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Tocqueville faced in previous centuries.

    In this lively and enlightening book, Professor Steven B. Smith introduces the wide terrain of political philosophy through the classic texts of the discipline. Works by the greatest thinkers illuminate the permanent problems of political life, Smith shows, and while we may not accept all their conclusions, it would be a mistake to overlook the relevance of their insights.

  • The Judge - A Life of Thomas Mellon, Founder of a Fortune

    Lawyer, judge, banker, classics professor, and councilman, Thomas Mellon greatly influenced the fortunes of his hometown, Pittsburgh, throughout the nineteenth century. In the process, he became one of the city's most important business leaders, and he laid the foundation for a family that would contribute considerably to the city's growth and welfare for much of the next hundred years, becoming one of the world's most recognizable names in industry, innovation, and philanthropy. Through his in-depth examination of the extensive Mellon family archives, in The Judge James Mellon--a direct descendent of Thomas Mellon--has fashioned an incisive portrait of the elder Mellon that presents the man in full. Offering a singular and insightful characterization of the Scotch-Irish value system that governed the patriarch's work and life, James Mellon captures the judge's complexities and contradictions, revealing him as a truly human figure.

    Among the recent biographies of Pittsburgh's famous businessmen, The Judge stands apart from the pack because of the author's unique perspective and his objective and scholarly approach to his subject.

  • Eugene O′Neil - A Life in Four Acts

    A major new biography of the Nobel Prize-winning playwright whose brilliantly original plays revolutionized American theater



    Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize

    This extraordinary new biography fully captures the intimacies of Eugene O'Neill's tumultuous life and the profound impact of his work on American drama. Robert M. Dowling innovatively recounts O'Neill's life in four acts, thus highlighting how the stories he told for the stage interweave with his actual life stories. Each episode also uncovers how O'Neill's work was utterly intertwined with, and galvanized by, the culture and history of his time.

    Much is new in this extensively researched book: connections between O'Neill's plays and his political and philosophical worldview; insights into his Irish upbringing and lifelong torment over losing faith in God; his vital role in African American cultural history; unpublished photographs, including a unique offstage picture of him with his lover Louise Bryant; new evidence of O'Neill's desire to become a novelist and what this reveals about his unique dramatic voice; and a startling revelation about the release of Long Day's Journey Into Night in defiance of his explicit instructions. This biography is also the first to discuss O'Neill's lost play Exorcism (a single copy of which was only recently recovered), a dramatization of his own suicide attempt.

    Written with lively informality yet a scholar's strict accuracy, Eugene O'Neill: A Life in Four Acts is a biography that America's foremost playwright richly deserves.

  • It′s Complicated - The Social Lives of Networked Teens

    An essential read, written by a leading expert, for anyone who wants to understand young people's use of social media

    What is new about how teenagers communicate through services such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram? Do social media affect the quality of teens' lives? In this eye-opening book, youth culture and technology expert danah boyd uncovers some of the major myths regarding teens' use of social media. She explores tropes about identity, privacy, safety, danger, and bullying. Ultimately, boyd argues that society fails young people when paternalism and protectionism hinder teenagers' ability to become informed, thoughtful, and engaged citizens through their online interactions. Yet despite an environment of rampant fear-mongering, boyd finds that teens often find ways to engage and to develop a sense of identity.

    Boyd's conclusions are essential reading not only for parents, teachers, and others who work with teens but also for anyone interested in the impact of emerging technologies on society, culture, and commerce in years to come. Offering insights gleaned from more than a decade of original fieldwork interviewing teenagers across the United States, boyd concludes reassuringly that the kids are all right. At the same time, she acknowledges that coming to terms with life in a networked era is not easy or obvious. In a technologically mediated world, life is bound to be complicated.

  • Lillian Hellman - An Audacious Life

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, a fresh look at Hellman's restless life, her extraordinary plays, and her autobiographical myths

    Glamorous, talented, audacious--Lillian Hellman knew everyone, did everything, had been everywhere. By the age of twenty-nine she had written The Children's Hour, the first of four hit Broadway plays, and soon she was considered a member of America's first rank of dramatists, a position she maintained for more than twenty-five years. Apart from her literary accomplishments--eight original plays and three volumes of memoirs--Hellman lived a rich life filled with notable friendships, controversial political activity, travel, and love affairs, most importantly with Dashiell Hammett. But by the time she died, the truth about her life and works had been called into question. Scandals attached to her name, having to do with sex, with money, and with her own veracity. Dorothy Gallagher confronts the conundrum that was Lillian Hellman--a woman with a capacity to inspire outrage as often as admiration. Exploring Hellman's leftist politics, her Jewish and Southern background, and her famous testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee, Gallagher also undertakes a new reading of Hellman's carefully crafted memoirs and plays, in which she is both revealed and hidden. Gallagher sorts through the facts and the myths, arriving at a sharply drawn portrait of a woman who lived large to the end of her remarkable life and never backed down from a fight.

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent" -New York Times

    "Exemplary" -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished" -New Yorker

    "Superb" -The Guardian

  • Other Primary Structures - 2-Volume Paperback Set with Slipcase

    The landmark Jewish Museum exhibition Primary Structures offered the first presentation of Minimalist sculptures in the United States, in 1966. The accompanying catalogue by Kynaston McShine became a key resource on artists such as Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, and Sol LeWitt, who were virtually unknown at the time. Other Primary Structures is a long-overdue reintroduction of this classic, out-of-print text. This two-volume set includes a replica of the original catalogue, plus a new companion volume by Jens Hoffmann that offers a global survey of early Minimalist sculpture during the 1960s and 1970s, featuring important sculptors from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Eastern Europe, and complementing the earlier catalogue's focus on American and British artists. Beautifully designed, this publication comes enclosed in a clear jacket that pays homage to the original catalogue's iconic cover. Other Primary Structures is invaluable for the study of modern art history and provides an authoritative survey of Minimalist sculpture in the 1960s.

  • The Progress of Love

    How do today's artists understand and depict notions of love? As witnessed in this compelling book, they often transcend traditional European romantic notions to create representations of love in less familiar manifestations. The title of this volume, The Progress of Love, refers to a group of 18th-century paintings by Jean-Honore Fragonard, who represented love as a contemporary phenomenon rather than in the guise of allegory or fiction. Today's artists go further.

    Exploring the forces that shape our conceptions of love, The Progress of Love brings together the work of 30 artists from Africa, Europe, the African diaspora, and the New World. Beautiful color images show works in a range of media by a dazzling array of contemporary artists, including Kelechi Amadi-Obi, Zoulikha Bouabdellah, Sophie Calle, Mary Ellen Carroll, Kendell Geers, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Romuald Hazoume, Zanele Muholi, Wura-Natasha Ogunji, and Yinka Shonibare.

  • Elephants on the Edge - What Animals Teach Us about Humanity

    Drawing on accounts from India to Africa and California to Tennessee, and on research in neuroscience, psychology, and animal behaviour, G. A. Bradshaw explores the minds, emotions, and lives of elephants. Wars, starvation, mass culls, poaching, and habitat loss have reduced elephant numbers from more than ten million to a few hundred thousand, leaving orphans bereft of the elders who would normally mentor them. As a consequence, traumatized elephants have become aggressive against people, other animals, and even one another; their behaviour is comparable to that of humans who have experienced genocide, other types of violence, and social collapse. By exploring the elephant mind and experience in the wild and in captivity, Bradshaw bears witness to the breakdown of ancient elephant cultures. All is not lost. People are working to save elephants by rescuing orphaned infants and rehabilitating adult zoo and circus elephants, using the same principles psychologists apply in treating humans who have survived trauma. Bradshaw urges us to support these and other models of elephant recovery and to solve pressing social and environmental crises affecting all animals, human or not.

  • Leger - Modern Art and the Metropolis

    With his landmark 1919 painting 'The City', Fernand Leger (1881-1955) inaugurated a vitally experimental decade during which he and others redefined the practice of painting in confrontation with the forms of cultural production that were central to urban life, ranging from graphic and advertising design to theatre, dance, film and architecture. This catalogue casts new light on the painting (reproducing all of its studies together for the first time), the avant-garde use of print media, and Leger's fascination with cinema and architecture, and contextualizes a network of international avant-gardes--including Blaise Cendrars, Le Corbusier, Jean Epstein, Piet Mondrian, Amedee Ozenfant, Francis Picabia and Theo van Doesburg--in relation to Leger. Featuring nearly 250 images of paintings, architectural designs, models, posters, set designs, and film stills and an anthology of relevant historical texts not previously published in English, this handsome volume conveys the spirit of experimentation of the 1920s. Scholars in the fields of art, architecture, and film history offer a deeper understanding of the relationship between art and the modern urban experience that defined this significant chapter in the history of modern art.

  • The Enchanted World of German Romantic Prints 1770-1850

    From the 1770s through the 1840s, German, Austrian, and Swiss artists used the medium of printmaking to create works that synthesized poetry, literature, music, and the visual arts in new and captivating ways. Finding an eager audience in the growing number of educated middle-class collectors, printmakers experimented with modern technologies, such as lithography, and drew on the contemporary interest in regional folklore and traditional fairy tales to produce innovative compositions that both contributed to and reflected the dramatic cultural and political upheavals of the Romantic era. Featuring the work of more than 120 artists, including Casper David Friedrich, Ludwig Emil Grimm, Joseph Anton Koch, Philipp Otto Runge, and Johann Gottfried Schadow, this authoritative book contains many unique and never-before-published examples of prints from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's unrivaled collection.

  • John Singer Sargent - Figures and Landscapes, 1900-1907 - The Complete Paintings V 7

    From 1900 to 1907, John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) traveled considerably, visiting the Alps, Italy, Spain, Norway, and Palestine. In Palestine in 1905, he painted a significant group of oils and watercolors as well as a group of studies of the Bedouin. It was during this burst of artistic production that he painted The Mountains of Moab (Tate Gallery, London), which was the first pure landscape he ever exhibited (Royal Academy, 1906). In Italy and Spain, Sargent painted parks, gardens, fountains, and statues, subjects that reveal his taste for the high style of Renaissance and Mannerist art and for the romantic grandeur of deserted spaces.

    As evidenced by the works in this new volume, Sargent reinvented himself as a landscape painter during his travels. Expressing a finely developed sense of modernity, he selected quirky angles of vision and used a range of compositional strategies--compression, foreshortening, abrupt croppings, and receding perspectives--in a manner that is quasi-photographic. He exploited the material qualities of pigment, and the impasto is often so thickly applied that figure and landscape seem to dissolve together creating rich, near abstract surface patterns. The restless handling and dynamic compositional rhythms act in creative tension with the artist's more traditional subject matter, generating notions of instability and ambiguity that are distinctly modern in character.

  • Earthly Signs

    Marina Tsvetaeva (1892-1941) ranks with Anna Akhmatova, Osip Mandelstam, and Boris Pasternak as one of Russia's greatest twentieth-century poets. Her suicide at the age of forty-eight was the tragic culmination of a life beset by loss and hardship. This volume presents for the first time in English a collection of essays published in the Russian emigre press after Tsvetaeva left Moscow in 1922. Based on diaries she kept from 1917 to 1920, Earthly Signs describes the broad social, economic, and cultural chaos provoked by the Bolshevik Revolution. Events and individuals are seen through the lens of her personal experience-that of a destitute young woman of upper-class background with two small children (one of whom died of starvation), a missing husband, and no means of support other than her poetry. These autobiographical writings, rich sources of information on Tsvetaeva and her literary contemporaries, are also significant for the insights they provide into the sources and methodology of her difficult poetic language. In addition, they supply a unique eyewitness account of a dramatic period in Russian history, told by a gifted and outspoken poet.

  • Seasons of Life: The Biological Rhythms That Enable Living Things to Thrive and Survive

    How do plants and animals "know" that the seasons will change? How do seasonal changes affect humans? What happens when the timing of seasonal events is altered?

    Just as daily events are timed by living creatures through circadian rhythms, so seasonal events are timed through an internal calendar that signals birds to return to nesting grounds, salmon to spawn, plants to flower, squirrels to hibernate, kelp to stop growing.

    In this fascinating book, Russell G. Foster and Leon Kreitzman draw on remarkable recent scientific advances to explain how seasonal change affects organisms, and how plants and animals over countless generations have evolved exquisite sensitivities and adaptations to the seasons. The authors also highlight the impact of seasonal change on human health and well-being. They conclude with a discussion of the dangers posed when climate changes disrupt the seasonal rhythms on which so much life depends.

    Surprising facts from Seasons of Life
    -The timing of human birth has a small but significant effect on various later life attributes, such as handedness and the susceptibility to many illnesses, including multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia.
    -Plants have the ability to measure the length of a period of light, and they germinate, flower, and successfully reproduce by using this information.
    -Birds migrate not in response to weather changes but by using an internal calendar.
    -Until recently, human birth was tightly coupled to the seasons, peaking in many societies in the spring.
    -Just as internal 24-hour circadian clocks predict daily change, many animals have a circannual clock in their brains that predicts the seasons.

  • Dog Days, Raven Nights

    The coauthor of the award-winning In the Company of Crows and Ravens and his wife, an animal-behavior expert, offer an engaging account of their days as young field biologists in Maine

    Twenty years ago, fresh out of graduate school and recently married, John and Colleen Marzluff left Arizona for a small cabin in the mountains of western Maine. Their mission: to conduct the first-ever extensive study of the winter ecology of the Common Raven under the tutelage of biologist Bernd Heinrich.

    Drawing on field notes and personal diaries, they vividly and eloquently chronicle their three-year endeavor to research a mysterious and often misunderstood bird--assembling a gigantic aviary, climbing sentry trees, building bird blinds in the forest, capturing and sustaining 300 ravens as study subjects, and enduring harsh Maine winters in pursuit of their goal. They also shared the unique challenges and joys of raising, training, and racing the sled dogs that assisted them in their work.

    Accompanied by Evon Zerbetz's lovely linocut illustrations, Dog Days, Raven Nights is a fascinating, behind-the-scenes look at the adventures of field science and an insightful exploration of the nature of relationships, both animal and human.

  • For God and Kaiser - The Imperial Austrian Army, 1619-1918

    The definitive history of Austria's multinational army and its immense role during three centuries of European military history

    Among the finest examples of deeply researched and colorfully written military history, Richard Bassett's For God and Kaiser is a major account of the Habsburg army told for the first time in English. Bassett shows how the Imperial Austrian Army, time and again, was a decisive factor in the story of Europe, the balance of international power, and the defense of Christendom. Moreover it was the first pan-European army made up of different nationalities and faiths, counting among its soldiers not only Christians but also Muslims and Jews.

    Bassett tours some of the most important campaigns and battles in modern European military history, from the seventeenth century through World War I. He details technical and social developments that coincided with the army's story and provides fascinating portraits of the great military leaders as well as noteworthy figures of lesser renown. Departing from conventional assessments of the Habsburg army as ineffective, outdated, and repeatedly inadequate, the author argues that it was a uniquely cohesive and formidable fighting force, in many respects one of the glories of the old Europe.

  • A Little History of Economics

    A lively, inviting account of the history of economics, told through events from ancient to modern times and the ideas of great thinkers in the field
    What causes poverty? Are economic crises inevitable under capitalism? Is government intervention in an economy a helpful approach or a disastrous idea? The answers to such basic economic questions matter to everyone, yet the unfamiliar jargon and math of economics can seem daunting. This clear, accessible, and even humorous book is ideal for young readers new to economics and for all readers who seek a better understanding of the full sweep of economic history and ideas.

    Economic historian Niall Kishtainy organizes short, chronological chapters that center on big ideas and events. He recounts the contributions of key thinkers including Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and others, while examining topics ranging from the invention of money and the rise of agrarianism to the Great Depression, entrepreneurship, environmental destruction, inequality, and behavioral economics. The result is a uniquely enjoyable volume that succeeds in illuminating the economic ideas and forces that shape our world.

  • If Mayors Ruled the World - Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities

    In the face of the most perilous challenges of our time - climate change, terrorism, poverty, and trafficking of drugs, guns and people - the nations of the world seem paralyzed. The problems are too big, too interdependent, too divisive for the nation-state. Is the nation-state, once democracy's best hope, today democratically dysfunctional? Obsolete? The answer, says Benjamin Barber in this highly provocative and original book, is yes. Cities and the mayors who run them can do and are doing a better job. Barber cites the unique qualities cities worldwide share: pragmatism, civic trust, participation, indifference to borders and sovereignty, and a democratic penchant for networking, creativity, innovation and cooperation. He demonstrates how city mayors, singly and jointly, are responding to transnational problems more effectively than nation-states mired in ideological infighting and sovereign rivalries. Featuring profiles of a dozen mayors around the world - courageous, eccentric, or both at once - If Mayors Ruled the World presents a compelling new vision of governance for the coming century. Barber makes a persuasive case that the city is democracy's best hope in a globalizing world, and great mayors are already proving that this is so.

  • The Passage to Europe - How a Continent became a Union

    This essential book explains the origins of the European Union, the forces binding it together and driving it forward, and how political leaders will surmount the current economic turmoil. Drawing on long experience working behind the scenes, Luuk van Middelaar captures the day-to-day dynamics and illuminates the political and philosophical issues that shaped the EU's development, providing a gripping account of the realities of power politics and shedding fresh light on the present and future of European unification.

  • Frederic Church - The Art and Science of Detail

    Frederic Church (1826-1900), the most celebrated painter in the United States during the mid-19th century, created monumental landscapes of North and South America, the Arctic, and the Middle East. These paintings were unsurpassed in their attention to detail, yet the significance of this pictorial approach has remained largely unexplored. In this important reconsideration of Church's works, Jennifer Raab offers the first sustained examination of the aesthetics of detail that fundamentally shaped 19th-century American landscape painting. Moving between historical context and close readings of famous canvases--including Niagara, The Heart of the Andes, and The Icebergs--Raab argues that Church's art challenged an earlier model of painting based on symbolic unity, revealing a representation of nature with surprising connections to scientific discourses of the time. The book traces Church's movement away from working in oil on canvas to shaping the physical landscape of Olana, his self-designed estate on the Hudson River, a move that allowed the artist to rethink scale and process while also engaging with pressing ecological questions. Beautifully illustrated with dramatic spreads and striking details of Church's works, Frederic Church: The Art and Science of Detail offers a profoundly new understanding of this canonical artist.

  • The Worst of Evils - The Fight Against Pain

    This riveting book takes the reader around the globe and through the centuries to discover how different cultures have sought to combat and treat physical pain. With colorful stories and sometimes frightening anecdotes, Dr. Thomas Dormandy describes a checkered progression of breakthroughs, haphazard experiments, ignorant attitudes, and surprising developments in human efforts to control pain. Attitudes toward pain and its perception have changed, as have the means of pain relief and scientific understanding. Dr. Dormandy offers a thoroughly fascinating, multi-cultural history that culminates with a discussion of today's successes--and failures--in the struggle against pain.

    The book's exploration is fused with accounts of the development of specific methods of pain relief, including the use of alcohol, plants, hypnosis, religious faith, stoic attitudes, local anesthesia, general anesthesia, and modern analgesics. Dr. Dormandy also looks at the most recent advances in pain clinics and palliative care for patients with terminal disease as well as the prospects for loosening pain's grip in the future.

  • Helena Rubinstein - Beauty is Power

    Helena Rubinstein (1872-1965), the great 20th-century cosmetics entrepreneur, changed the way women saw themselves, using her own remarkable life and spectacular art collections as a model. Rubinstein broke free from the constraints of her 19th-century, small-town, Polish Jewish background to become a giant of the beauty industry and an international household name. A key figure in the development of modern taste and style, she produced and marketed the means for ordinary women to assert their own individuality. Through her conception of the beauty salon as a place of modernist display, she empowered the modern woman to define herself through her choices in taste and decor.

    Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power traces the path of this remarkable early feminist and visionary art patron. In Rubinstein's world, art and commerce blended seamlessly. She ornamented her salons and homes with splendid artworks--Surrealist murals, modernist portraits, Art Deco furniture, Venetian mirrors, and one of the era's great collections of African and Oceanic art. Her understanding of beauty was similarly expansive and democratic: she saw the face as the site for self-expression and the exploration of identity. The Rubinstein beauty program thus included not only makeup and hairdressing, but also lessons in health, deportment, and culture. Such features, innovative at the time and wildly popular, today provide a fascinating glimpse into popular culture as it affected women in the 20th century.

  • Robert Indiana

    The popularity of Robert Indiana's LOVE works made the Pop artist a household name--and torpedoed his reputation, precipitating his self-imposed exile from the New York art world that had once acclaimed him and eclipsing the breadth and emotionally powerful content of the rest of his dynamic, conceptually charged work. Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE is a compelling reassessment of the artist's contributions to American art during his long and prolific career.

    Indiana (b. 1928) has explored the power of language, American identity, and personal history for five decades. Although his imagery, suggestive of highway signs and roadside attractions, is visually dazzling on its surface and seems to reflect a native spirit of optimism, it contains a multilayered conceptual intricacy and darkness that draw on his own biography as well as on the myths, history, and literature of the United States. As chronicled in this landmark reappraisal, Indiana was a seminal figure of the 1960s and 1970s, whose artistic genius combined Pop art, hard-edged abstraction, and language-based conceptualism. With a generous illustration program, an appendix of the artist's interviews and statements, and contributions by leading experts, this book provides a long overdue analysis of the development of Indiana's career, his relationship to early-20th-century American painters, and his influence on contemporary language-based artists. In addition to an illustrated chronology, selected exhibition history, and selected bibliography, Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE includes transcripts from roundtable discussions with key Indiana experts, such as Thomas Crow, Bill Katz, Robert Pincus-Witten, Susan Elizabeth Ryan, Robert Storr, Allison Unruh, and John Wilmerding, who offer compelling insights on the significance of Indiana and his art.


  • The Experience of God - Being, Conciousness, Bliss

    From one of the most revered scholars of religion, an incisive explanation of how the word "God" functions in the world's great faiths

    Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion--God--frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word "God" functions in the world's great theistic faiths.

    Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity's knowledge of the divine mysteries. Constructing his argument around three principal metaphysical "moments"--being, consciousness, and bliss--the author demonstrates an essential continuity between our fundamental experience of reality and the ultimate reality to which that experience inevitably points.

    Thoroughly dismissing such blatant misconceptions as the deists' concept of God, as well as the fundamentalist view of the Bible as an objective historical record, Hart provides a welcome antidote to simplistic manifestoes. In doing so, he plumbs the depths of humanity's experience of the world as powerful evidence for the reality of God and captures the beauty and poetry of traditional reflection upon the divine.

  • Possession: The Curious History of Private Collectors from Antiquity to the Present

    A riveting account of private art collectors' passion from Roman times to the present

    Whether it's the discovery of $1.6 billion in Nazi-looted art or the news that Syrian rebels are looting UNESCO archaeological sites to buy arms, art crime commands headlines. Erin Thompson, America's only professor of art crime, explores the dark history of looting, smuggling, and forgery that lies at the heart of many private art collections and many of the world's most renowned museums.

    Enlivened by fascinating personalities and scandalous events, Possession shows how collecting antiquities has been a way of creating identity, informed by a desire to annex the past while providing an illicit thrill along the way. Thompson's accounts of history's most infamous collectors--from the Roman Emperor Tiberius, who stole a life-sized nude Greek statue for his bedroom, to Queen Christina of Sweden, who habitually pilfered small antiquities from her fellow aristocrats, to Sir William Hamilton, who forced his mistress to enact poses from his collection of Greek vases--are as mesmerizing as they are revealing.

  • Tenor - History of a Voice

    From its emergence in the sixteenth century to the phenomenon of the Three Tenors and beyond, the tenor voice has grown in popularity and esteem. This engaging and authoritative book - the first comprehensive history of tenor singing - presents fascinating details about the worlds great performers, styles of singing in different countries, teachers and music schools, the variety of compositions for the tenor voice, and much more. John Potter begins by surveying the prehistory of the tenor in the medieval period, when Gregorian chant and early polyphony had implications for a voice-type, and proceeds to the sixteenth century, when singers were first identified as tenors. He focuses on many of the greatest tenors - those who predated the gramophone as well as those whose recorded voices may still be heard - and considers the ways in which each is historically significant. The names range from legendary early figures like Ludwig Schnoor von Carolsfeld (Wagners first Tristan) to those more familiar like Enrico Caruso, Richard Tauber, Mario Lanza, Roberto Alagna, Ian Bostridge, Andrea Bocelli, Il Divo, and, of course, Pavarotti, Domingo, and Carreras. Admirers of the tenor voice will especially appreciate the books unique reference section, with bibliographical and discographical/video information on several hundred tenors.

  • Sussex: East with Brighton and Hove - The Buildings of England

    The East Sussex volume of The Buildings of England covers an area ranging from the High Weald in the north of the county to the massive ridge of the South Downs and the resort towns and ancient ports of the coast. Its coastal resorts are particularly distinguished, none more so than Brighton and Hove, where John Nash's oriental Pavilion for the Prince Regent sets the tone. Elsewhere castles at Camber, Bodiam and fortified town walls at Rye and Winchelsea attest to its military past and Battle Abbey to its medieval endowments. The towns and villages are especially rich in timber-framed, brick and tile houses for which the county is famous. The twentieth century makes its mark in the exhilarating De La Warr Pavilion at Bexhill, and the uncompromising forms of the 1960s University of Sussex campus.

  • Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America

    From a highly respected thinker on race, gender, and American politics, a new consideration of black women and how distorted stereotypes affect their political beliefs

    Jezebel's sexual lasciviousness, Mammy's devotion, and Sapphire's outspoken anger--these are among the most persistent stereotypes that black women encounter in contemporary American life. Hurtful and dishonest, such representations force African American women to navigate a virtual crooked room that shames them and shapes their experiences as citizens. Many respond by assuming a mantle of strength that may convince others, and even themselves, that they do not need help. But as a result, the unique political issues of black women are often ignored and marginalized.

    In this groundbreaking book, Melissa V. Harris-Perry uses multiple methods of inquiry, including literary analysis, political theory, focus groups, surveys, and experimental research, to understand more deeply black women's political and emotional responses to pervasive negative race and gender images. Not a traditional political science work concerned with office-seeking, voting, or ideology, Sister Citizen instead explores how African American women understand themselves as citizens and what they expect from political organizing. Harris-Perry shows that the shared struggle to preserve an authentic self and secure recognition as a citizen links together black women in America, from the anonymous survivors of Hurricane Katrina to the current First Lady of the United States.

  • Prairie

    Since the 1970s, photographer Robert Adams (b. 1937) has chronicled the changing landscape of the American West, from the growth of cities like Denver to the seemingly unconquerable openness of the Great Plains-the subject of Adams's Prairie. The first edition of Prairie, published in 1978, is now a sought-after collector's item; this expanded volume will include all of those original images, along with new photographs selected and sequenced by Adams himself, many of which are being published for the first time. Informed by a dedication to ecological principles, Adams's photographs offer an unsentimental view of the American wilderness-paying tribute both to its natural beauty and to the infrastructure of life on the land: farmhouses, gravel roads, and furrowed fields. This future collector's item, with 45 tritone reproductions, stands as a monument to Adams's work, and a poignant reminder of the quiet but profound ways in which our habitation of the land alters it.

  • Jean-Luc Moulene - Opus + One

    Since the late 1980s, Jean-Luc Moulene (b. 1955) has developed a body of work informed by a critical investigation of artistic authorship, addressing such issues as autonomy, immanence, and anarchic politics. Although he is best known for his enigmatic and seductive large-format photographs, Moulene has maintained a parallel exploration of materials and objects--manufactured and found, industrial and organic, intimate and imposing--that he has collectively titled Opus. This book, the first critical study of Moulene's work, brings together leading scholars to examine the artist's diverse aesthetic strategies and interests in the relationships between social and political arenas and systems and orders, including geometry, mathematics, social sciences, and human behavior. Featured essays also examine Moulene's theoretical and playful inquiries into the plasticity of materials and the ways we see and understand both still and moving images.

  • Fashioning the Object - Bless, Boudicca and the Sandra Backlund

    The newest volume in the Art Institute of Chicago's successful A+D series, Fashioning the Object invites readers to visit three of the most visionary design studios at work today: Bless, Boudicca, and Sandra Backlund. Fiercely independent and far-reaching in their influences, these young designers from Berlin, London, Paris, and Stockholm are producing fashion objects that straddle the line between traditional craft and cutting-edge technique, both in their use of materials and in the promotion of their brands.

    Zoe Ryan establishes the context for understanding the exciting departures these design houses represent, as the young creators draw inspiration from an array of other disciplines, including architecture, performance, film, and fine art. From Bless's numbered editions, to Boudicca's graffiti-can perfume, to Backlund's ready-to-wear pieces of knitted copper, these designers adapt storied objects to new uses and break old conventions, promulgating their ideas in playful, groundbreaking ways.

  • The Architecture of Alexandria and Egypt 300 B.C - A.D. 700

    The first reconstruction of the architecture of ancient Alexandria and Egypt, long believed lost beyond recovery

    This masterful history of the monumental architecture of Alexandria, as well as of the rest of Egypt, encompasses an entire millennium--from the city's founding by Alexander the Great in 331 B.C. to the years just after the Islamic conquest of A.D. 642. Long considered lost beyond recall, the architecture of ancient Alexandria has until now remained mysterious. But here Judith McKenzie shows that it is indeed possible to reconstruct the city and many of its buildings by means of meticulous exploration of archaeological remains, written sources, and an array of other fragmentary evidence.

    The book approaches its subject at the macro- and the micro-level: from city-planning, building types, and designs to architectural style. It addresses the interaction between the imported Greek and native Egyptian traditions; the relations between the architecture of Alexandria and the other cities and towns of Egypt as well as the wider Mediterranean world; and Alexandria's previously unrecognized role as a major source of architectural innovation and artistic influence. Lavishly illustrated with new plans of the city in the Ptolemaic, Roman, and Byzantine periods; reconstruction drawings; and photographs, the book brings to life the ancient city and uncovers the true extent of its architectural legacy in the Mediterranean world.

  • The Politics of Religion in Early Modern France

    Rich in detail and broad in scope, this majestic book is the first to reveal the interaction of politics and religion in France during the crucial years of the long seventeenth century. Joseph Bergin begins with the Wars of Religion, which proved to be longer and more violent in France than elsewhere in Europe and left a legacy of unresolved tensions between church and state with serious repercussions for each. He then draws together a series of unresolved problems--both practical and ideological--that challenged French leaders thereafter, arriving at an original and comprehensive view of the close interrelations between the political and spiritual spheres of the time.

    The author considers the powerful religious dimension of French royal power even in the seventeenth century, the shift from reluctant toleration of a Protestant minority to increasing aversion, conflicts over the independence of the Catholic church and the power of the pope over secular rulers, and a wealth of other interconnected topics.

  • Nam June Paik - Becoming Robot

    This new, fully illustrated catalogue on the celebrated progenitor of video art, Nam June Paik (1932-2006), brings together a host of scholars, artists and Paik's own collaborators to illuminate the work of this innovative artist. An essay by curator Michelle Yun takes readers through Paik's highly original career, providing insight into his radical and witty experiments with technology, especially in relation to the body, which he viewed as vital platforms for the future of art, science and education. Scholars David Joselit and John Maeda contribute texts examining the artist's interest in new media and popular culture. A roundtable discussion with three of Paik's own artistic collaborators, and contemporary artists' statements shed light on the collaborative process and Paik's enduring influence on a rtistic practice today. Drawing on the newly established Nam June Paik Archive at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, this catalogue also features never-before published primary sources that highlight Paik's prescient attitude towards the integration of increasingly indispensable technologies into modern life.

  • Marisol - Sculptures and Works on Paper, 1955-1998

    A highly-anticipated volume that elucidates Marisol's artistic evolution and reestablishes her as a major figure in postwar American art

    The Paris-born, Venezuelan artist Marisol (b. 1930) burst onto the 1960s New York art scene with large figural sculptures in a wild amalgam of mixed media. Often satirical, Marisol's art is inspired by sources as diverse as Pre-Columbian art, folk art, Cubism, and Surrealism. For the past several decades, however, Marisol has shunned the spotlight and her artwork has been overlooked as a result.

    Accompanying the first retrospective of Marisol's work in more than a decade, this long-awaited and beautifully illustrated volume offers a much-needed corrective, reestablishing her role as a major figure in postwar American art. Essays by leading scholars of Latin American and 20th-century art explore all facets of her work including her influences, the theme of family, American politics and pop culture, Native American rights and poverty, her role as a female artist, and her relationship to Latin America and Latin American art.

  • The Myth of Nouveau Realisme - Art and the Performative in Postwar France

    On October 27, 1960, art critic Pierre Restany named a group of Paris-based artists the "Nouveaux Realistes" (New Realists) in a founding declaration that stated, "The New Realists recognize their collective singularity. New Realism = new perceptual approaches of the real." Besides Restany, this group included Arman, Francois Dufrene, Raymond Hains, Yves Klein, Martial Raysse, Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely, and Jacques Villegle. Their work incorporated consumer objects and new media in response to the postwar period's painterly modes and its burgeoning consumer and industrial society. However, they did not share a common avant-garde strategy.

    The Myth of Nouveau Realisme is a critical reassessment of this important neo-avant-garde movement. Kaira M. Cabanas offers an interdisciplinary account of their work and challenges the ideas of Restany, who mandated a "direct appropriation of the real." Cabanas posits that, for the Nouveaux Realistes, realism engaged performative practices to produce alternative social meanings.

  • Northamptonshire - Buildings of England Series

    Some of England's grandest country houses are to be found in this prosperous rural county. The Elizabethan Renaissance Kirby Hall, the Jacobean mansion at Apethorpe, the late 17th-century French-inspired Boughton, Hawksmoor's stately Baroque Easton Neston, and the interiors of Althorp provide a fascinating survey of changing taste through the centuries. Complementing them are smaller buildings of great character, supreme among them those of Sir Thomas Tresham: the eccentric and ingenious Triangular Lodge at Rushton and the evocative New Beild at Lyveden. Of no less interest are the fine churches, from Anglo-Saxon Brixworth to the noble Gothic of Warmington, Rushden and Finedon and from All Saints, Northampton, one of the grandest 17th-century churches outside London, to Comper's St. Mary's, Wellingborough. Chief among the towns, Northampton has not only distinguished Victorian and Edwardian public, commercial and industrial buildings but also the principal work in England by Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

  • Reynolds - Portraiture in Action

    A deeply researched and elegantly written study on Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792)--Georgian England's most celebrated portraitist and the first president of the British Royal Academy of Arts--this lavishly illustrated volume explores all aspects of Reynolds's portraiture. Mark Hallett provides detailed, compelling readings of Reynolds's most celebrated and striking works, investigating the ways in which they were appreciated and understood in his own lifetime. Recovering the artist's dynamic interaction with his sitters and patrons, and revealing the dramatic impact of his portraits within the burgeoning exhibition culture of late-18th-century London, Hallett also unearths the intimate relationship between Reynolds's paintings and graphic art. Reynolds: Portraiture in Action offers a new understanding of the artist's career within the extremely competitive London art world and takes readers into the engrossing debates and controversies that captivated the city and its artists.

  • In Harmony - The Norma Jean Calderwood Collection of Islamic Art

    A major philanthropist from the Boston area, Norma Jean Calderwood assembled an extensive collection of Islamic art, ranging from austere and powerful epigraphic ceramics of the 9th and 10th centuries to the introspective realism of late-19th-century portraiture. With more than fifty pieces of ceramics, the collection represents every significant period and technique in Persian pottery. It has particular strength in illustrations of the greatest epic poem in the Persian language, the Shahnama (Book of Kings) by Abu'l-Qasim Firdawsi, and also includes beautiful examples of album painting, drawing, and calligraphy.

    Nine essays by diverse experts explore issues of conservation as well as the cultural and historical significance of various objects in this largely unpublished collection. Topics include the influence of calligraphic line and physical gesture on Safavid drawings; figurative imagery on Iranian ceramics; and what cobalt pigment reveals about an object's origins.

  • Leap Before You Look - Black Mountain College, 1933 1957

    A dynamic new look at the legendary college that was a major incubator of the arts in midcentury America

    In 1933, John Rice founded Black Mountain College in North Carolina as an experiment in making artistic experience central to learning. Though it operated for only 24 years, this pioneering school played a significant role in fostering avant-garde art, music, dance, and poetry, and an astonishing number of important artists taught or studied there. Among the instructors were Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Buckminster Fuller, Karen Karnes, M. C. Richards, and Willem de Kooning, and students included Ruth Asawa, Robert Rauschenberg, and Cy Twombly.

    Leap Before You Look is a singular exploration of this legendary school and of the work of the artists who spent time there. Scholars from a variety of fields contribute original essays about diverse aspects of the College--spanning everything from its farm program to the influence of Bauhaus principles--and about the people and ideas that gave it such a lasting impact. In addition, catalogue entries highlight selected works, including writings, musical compositions, visual arts, and crafts. The book's fresh approach and rich illustration program convey the atmosphere of creativity and experimentation that was unique to Black Mountain College, and that served as an inspiration to so many. This timely volume will be essential reading for anyone interested in the College and its enduring legacy.

  • How to Read Oceanic Art

    A literary master's entertaining guide to reading with deeper insight, better understanding, and greater pleasure

    Art from Oceania, the region encompassing the islands of the central and south Pacific, spans hundreds of distinct artistic processes, formats, and mediums. Many people's exposure to Oceanic art comes through its influence on the work of European artists, and therefore Oceanic works themselves often remain difficult for Western viewers to interpret and comprehend. How to Read Oceanic Art, the third book in a series of guides to understanding different artistic genres, helps elucidate this subject through explanation of specific objects.

    The book analyzes the most illustrative Oceanic pieces from the Metropolitan Museum's collection--including lively painted masks, powerful figurines, and intricately carved wooden poles--which together represent the extraordinary diversity of artistic traditions in the region. Attractive photography and clear, engaging texts explain how and why various works were made as well as how they were used. This publication is an invaluable resource for art historical study, and also an important gateway to wider appreciation of Oceanic heritage and visual culture.

  • The King′s Pictures - The Formation and Dispersal of the Collections of Charles I and His Courtiers

    The greatest paintings in today's most famous museums were once part of a fluid exchange determined by volatile political fortunes. In the first half of the 17th century, masterpieces by Titian, Raphael, and Leonardo, among others, were the objects of fervent pursuit by art connoisseurs. Francis Haskell traces the fate of collections extracted from Italy, Spain, and France by King Charles I and his circle, which, after a brief stay in Britain, were largely dispersed after the Civil War to princely galleries across the Continent. From vivid case studies of individual collectors, advisers, and artists, and acute analysis of personality and motive, Haskell challenges ideas about this episode in British cultural life and traces some of the factors that forever changed the artistic map of Europe.


  • Virtual Justice - The New Laws of Online Worlds

    What happens in the virtual world doesn't always stay in the virtual world

    Tens of millions of people today are living part of their life in a virtual world. In places like World of Warcraft, Second Life, and Free Realms, people are making friends, building communities, creating art, and making real money. Business is booming on the virtual frontier, as billions of dollars are paid in exchange for pixels on screens. But sometimes things go wrong. Virtual criminals defraud online communities in pursuit of real-world profits. People feel cheated when their avatars lose virtual property to wrongdoers. Increasingly, they turn to legal systems for solutions. But when your avatar has been robbed, what law is there to assist you?

    In Virtual Justice, Greg Lastowka illustrates the real legal dilemmas posed by virtual worlds. Presenting the most recent lawsuits and controversies, he explains how governments are responding to the chaos on the cyberspace frontier. After an engaging overview of the history and business models of today's virtual worlds, he explores how laws of property, jurisdiction, crime, and copyright are being adapted to pave the path of virtual law.

    Virtual worlds are becoming more important to society with each passing year. This pioneering study will be an invaluable guide to scholars of online communities for years to come.

  • The Network is Your Customer - Five Strategies to Thrive in a Digital World

    There is no shortage of books about digital media, but what has been missing is a strategic take on how business owners can utilize the most powerful asset of the digital age: customer networks. Whether shoppers, business clients, charitable donors, or election voters, todays customers are harnessing digital tools to connect to, communicate with, and contribute to businesses. In The Network Is Your Customer, digital strategy expert David Rogers shows business owners and company leaders how to think strategically about customer networks and harness their power to create new opportunities for any organization. By identifying the five core behaviours of networked customers - accessing, engaging, customizing, connecting, and collaborating - he uncovers five core strategies that any organization can use to create new value. These strategies can be used not just for communications and social networking but to drive sales, enhance innovation, reduce costs, gain customer insight, and build breakthrough products and services that rewrite existing business categories. With clear analysis and practical frameworks, Rogers shows how any organization can apply the five strategies to meet its own key business objectives. He presents a wealth of case studies from numerous business, consumer, and nonprofit categories. And he offers a clear process for planning and implementing a customer network strategy. Whether they sell shoes or news, software or healthcare, any business leaders who want to succeed in our digital age will find the answers they need in The Network Is Your Customer.

  • Galileo - Watcher of the Skies

    A provocative and penetrating new life of Galileo, placing the man, his achievements, and his failures in the broader history of the Scientific Revolution

    Galileo (1564-1642) is one of the most important and controversial figures in the history of science. A hero of modern science and key to its birth, he was also a deeply divided man: a scholar committed to the establishment of scientific truth yet forced to concede the importance of faith, and a brilliant analyst of the elegantly mathematical workings of nature yet bungling and insensitive with his own family.

    Tackling Galileo as astronomer, engineer, and author, David Wootton places him at the center of Renaissance culture. He traces Galileo through his early rebellious years; the beginnings of his scientific career constructing a "new physics"; his move to Florence seeking money, status, and greater freedom to attack intellectual orthodoxies; his trial for heresy and narrow escape from torture; and his house arrest and physical (though not intellectual) decline. Wootton reveals much that is new--from Galileo's premature Copernicanism to a previously unrecognized illegitimate daughter--and, controversially, rejects the long-established orthodoxy which holds that Galileo was a good Catholic.

    Absolutely central to Galileo's significance--and to science more broadly--is the telescope, the potential of which Galileo was the first to grasp. Wootton makes clear that it totally revolutionized and galvanized scientific endeavor to discover new and previously unimagined facts. Drawing extensively on Galileo's voluminous letters, many of which were self-censored and sly, this is an original, arresting, and highly readable biography of a difficult, remarkable Renaissance genius.

  • A Choreographer's Score. Fase, Rosas danst Rosas, Elena's Aria, Bartók / Mikrokosmos (va) (+ 4 DVD) - PROJET ANNULE: Version anglaise

    L'ouvrage se propose de transmettre un message pedagogique a propos des quatre premieres oeuvres de Rosas : Fase, Rosas Danst Rosas, Elenas Aria, Bartok/Mikrokosmos. Chacun des quatre chapitres se compose d'une interview, de notes, de croquis anciens et nouveaux d'Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, d'images de films et de photographies.

    Rosas est le nom de la compagnie de danse et structure de production qui s'est formee autour de la choregraphe et danseuse Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker. Celle-ci a d'emblee conquis la scene internationale de la danse avec son premier spectacle de 1982, Fase, quatre mouvements sur la musique de Steve Reich. La danse de Rosas, c'est tout simplement de l'ecriture en mouvement dans le temps et l'espace.

  • The War for the Seas: A Maritime History of World War II


    A bold and authoritative maritime history of World War II which takes a fully international perspective and challenges our existing understanding.

    The battle for control of the seas was crucial to determining the outcome of the Second World War. But how, facing the supremely effective German war machine, could Britain, the US and their allies successfully block the enemy at sea?

    In this authoritative and richly detailed account of wartime sea power, Evan Mawdsley traces events from the first German U boat operations in September 1939 through to the surrender of the last U boats in May 1945. Covering all the major battles in the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans, War for the Seas surveys the efforts of sea powers both major and minor, including the British Empire, United States, Japan and Germany as well as France, Italy and the Soviet Union. Mawdsley discusses the role of individual leaders, technical competition and change, and logistics and intelligence and provides a host of new insights into the epic struggle to defeat the Axis powers.

  • A Natural History of English Gardening - 1650 1800

    A beautifully illustrated exploration of the quest for order within the garden, and within the natural world

    Inspired by the pioneering naturalist Gilbert White, who viewed natural history as the common study of cultural and natural communities, Mark Laird unearths forgotten historical data to reveal the complex visual cultures of early modern gardening. Ranging from climate studies to the study of a butterfly's life cycle, this original and fascinating book examines the scientific quest for order in nature as an offshoot of ordering the garden and field. Laird follows a broad series of chronological events--from the Little Ice Age winter of 1683 to the drought summer of the volcanic 1783--to probe the nature of gardening and husbandry, the role of amateurs in scientific disciplines, and the contribution of women as gardener-naturalists. Illustrated by a stunning wealth of visual and literary materials--paintings, engravings, poetry, essays, and letters, as well as prosaic household accounts and nursery bills--Laird fundamentally transforms our understanding of the English landscape garden as a powerful cultural expression.

  • Man, Myth and Sensual Pleasures - Jan Gossart′s Renaissance

    Jan Gossart (c. 1472-1532) has long been recognized for his pivotal role in disseminating and transforming the art of antiquity and the Italian Renaissance style in the North. This catalogue raisonne of the Netherlandish painter, draftsman, and printmaker is the first major publication on the artist in more than forty years. His achievement is reevaluated here in light of the many discoveries revealed by recent scholarship and new technical examination of the paintings. Among the topics discussed are the impact of Gossarts trip to Rome; the influence of his patron Philip of Burgundy; his simultaneous work in Gothic and new antique modes; the attribution of all his extant drawings, including a number of newly found sheets; the first serious consideration of his prints; and the evolution of his working methods and painting techniques.

  • Wim Del Voye Introspective

    Wim Delvoye (b. 1965) is known for his inventive and often controversial projects, and his work has been exhibited around the world. One of a generation of Belgian artists who have revolutionized contemporary art, Delvoye explores the body and its functions, producing art that combines the attractive and the repulsive, and addresses themes including religion and politics. One of his most famous works is Cloaca, a digestion machine; another significant project involves tattooed live pigs.

    Coinciding with Delvoye's exhibition as guest of honor at the Louvre, Wim Delvoye Introspective is the culmination of close collaboration between the artist and distinguished scholars and critics. This publication presents a complete overview of works by the artist, demonstrating the range of media, technique, and thought-provoking subjects that defines his art.

  • Building - Inside Studio Gang Architects

    One of the foremost architects working today, Jeanne Gang is widely recognized for her innovative and independent practice. Studio Gang Architects confronts pressing contemporary issues and seeks to answer questions that exist locally but resound globally. The firm's work is exemplified by recent projects such as the Aqua Tower in Chicago, an 82-story high-rise, which critic Paul Goldberger described as "reclaim[ing] the notion that thrilling and beautiful form can still emerge out of the realm of the practical."

    With the studio poised to contribute a new set of buildings to the global skyline, Building examines its most current work, twelve built and unbuilt projects that address four major issues facing contemporary architecture: its relationship to nature, the development of dense urban areas, the integration of the ideas of community members, and architecture and performance. Featuring essays, interviews, sketches, and drawings--many previously unpublished--this beautifully illustrated book provides an insider's look at a cutting-edge architectural practice.

  • DJenne-Jeno - 1000 Years of Terracotta Statuary in Mali

    The so-called Djenne statuary emerged circa A.D. 700 and flourished until 1750. The terracotta statues were manufactured by various groups inhabiting the Inland Niger Delta region of present-day Mali, centered around the ancient urban center of Djenne-Jeno. These terracotta sculptures, more than 300 of which are published in this book for the first time, express a remarkable range of physical conditions and human emotions, providing the largest corpus of ancient sacred gestures of any civilization in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Djenne-Jeno investigates this important and mainly unpublished corpus of terracotta statuary of one of the Mande art styles of West Africa, and traces potential connections between regions in West Africa whose artistic styles were previously thought to have developed independently. Generously illustrated with hundreds of color images, this book represents a significant contribution to the study of an art form virtually unknown until a few decades ago.


  • Antony and Cleopatra

    From the prizewinning author of Caesar and How Rome Fell, a major new account of the charged love affair between Antony and Cleopatra, richly informed by military and political history

    A masterfully told--and deeply human--story of love, politics, and ambition, Adrian Goldsworthy's Antony and Cleopatra delivers a compelling reassessment of a major episode in ancient history.

    In this remarkable dual biography of the two great lovers of the ancient world, Goldsworthy goes beyond myth and romance to create a nuanced and historically acute portrayal of his subjects, set against the political backdrop of their time. A history of lives lived intensely at a time when the world was changing profoundly, the book takes readers on a journey that crosses cultures and boundaries from ancient Greece and ancient Egypt to the Roman Empire.

    Drawing on his prodigious knowledge of the ancient world and his keen sense of the period's military and political history, Goldsworthy creates a singular portrait of the iconic lovers. "Antony and Cleopatra were first and foremost political animals," explains Goldsworthy, who places politics and ideology at the heart of their storied romance. Undertaking a close analysis of ancient sources and archaeological evidence, Goldsworthy bridges the gaps of current scholarship and dispels misconceptions that have entered the popular consciousness. He explains why Cleopatra was consistently portrayed by Hollywood as an Egyptian, even though she was really Greek, and argues that Antony had far less military experience than anyone would suspect from reading Shakespeare and other literature. Goldsworthy makes an important case for understanding Antony as a powerful Roman senator and political force in his own right.

  • The Life and Art of Luca Signorelli

    Definitive in its scholarship and thrilling in its scope, this lavishly illustrated volume offers the first book-length study of Luca Signorelli (1450-1523), sometimes described as the "least-known major artist" of the Renaissance. Twenty years of painstaking archival research have produced this portrait of Signorelli in public and private life--an adventurous painter who believed art was divinely inspired, and an affectionate family man who participated energetically in public life. In his paintings--of which the Last Judgement in Orvieto cathedral is his undisputed masterpiece--Signorelli integrated his observations of daily life with a fresh and sensitive approach to representing religious subjects.

    A student of Piero della Francesca, Signorelli was influential into the early 16th century, though he was ultimately eclipsed by his friends Raphael and Michelangelo. Signorelli's work is represented in museums around the world, and this book now offers new audiences and scholars a complete picture of one of the Renaissance's most significant and intriguing artists.

  • The World of Khubilai Khan: Chinese Art in the Yuan Dynasty

    In 1215, the year Khubilai Khan (1215-1294) was born, the Mongols made their first major incursion into North China and initiated a period of extraordinary creativity in the arts that was encouraged by the confluence of many cultures and ethnic groups. This period lasted approximately 150 years and had its greatest flowering in the Yuan dynasty, founded by Khubilai in 1271 and lasting until 1368. Xanadu to Dadu is a groundbreaking study of the art and culture produced at this time by the Chinese and by the highly skilled craftsmen from Western and Central Asia, who were selected for their abilities and brought together in Northern Chinese workshops, where they exchanged ideas, styles, and art forms. The works they produced created a new art style that would influence the arts of China in all subsequent periods. In the 11 essays included in this volume, art historians discuss the origins of new art forms, daily life in Yuan China, in particular at the imperial court and in the capital cities of Xanadu (Shangdu) and Dadu (Beijing), and the impact on the arts of the religions practised at this time, including Buddhism, Daoism, Christianity, Manichaeism, Hinduism, and Islam. The essays are accompanied by beautifully reproduced colour illustrations of artworks from Chinese and international collections.

  • Liberty′s Refuge - The Forgotten Freedom of Assembly

    This original and provocative book looks at an important constitutional freedom that today is largely forgotten: the right of assembly. While this right lay at the heart of some of the most important social movements in American history - abolitionism, women's suffrage, the labour and civil rights movements - courts now prefer to speak about the freedoms of association and speech. But the right of 'expressive association' undermines protections for groups whose purposes are demonstrable not by speech or expression but through ways of being. John D. Inazu demonstrates that the forgetting of assembly and the embrace of association loses sight of important dimensions of our constitutional tradition.

  • The Golden Ass

    Acclaimed poet and translator Sarah Ruden brilliantly brings Apuleius's comic tale to life

    With accuracy, wit, and intelligence, this remarkable new translation of The Golden Ass breathes new life into Apuleius's classic work. Sarah Ruden, a lyric poet as well as a highly respected translator, skillfully duplicates the verbal high jinks of Apuleius's ever-popular novel. It tells the story of Lucius, a curious and silly young man, who is turned into a donkey when he meddles with witchcraft. Doomed to wander from region to region and mistreated by a series of deplorable owners, Lucius at last is restored to human form with the help of the goddess Isis.

    The Golden Ass, the first Latin novel to survive in its entirety, is related to the Second Sophistic, a movement of learned and inventive literature. In a translation that is both the most faithful and the most entertaining to date, Ruden reveals to modern readers the vivid, farcical ingenuity of Apuleius's style.

  • Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, and the World of Elizabethan Art - Painting and Patronage at the Court of Elizabeth I

    This book is the first comprehensive survey of aristocratic art collecting and patronage in Elizabethan England, as seen through the activities of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (ca. 1532-1588). One of the most fascinating and controversial people of his day, Leicester was also the most important patron of painters at the Elizabethan court. He amassed a substantial art collection, including commissioned works by Nicholas Hilliard, Paolo Veronese, and Federico Zuccaro; helped foster the birth of an English vernacular discourse on the visual arts; and was an early exponent, in England, of the Italian Renaissance view of the painter as the practitioner of a liberal art and, thus, fit company for the educated and well-born. Although Leicester's picture collection and personal papers were widely dispersed after his death, this volume's pioneering research reconstructs his lost world and, with it, a turning point in the history of British art. Some of the paintings featured here are little-known images from private collections, never before reproduced in color.

  • Brilliant Discourse - Pictures and Readers in Early Modern Rome

    Sixteenth-century Roman presses turned out hundreds of technical treatises and learned discourses written in the vernacular. Covering topics as diverse as the cultivation of silkworms, the lives of the saints, and the order of the cosmos, they made esoteric knowledge accessible to a broad spectrum of readers. Many of these books were illustrated with beautiful etchings, engravings, or woodcuts, and some were written in the form of theatrical and engaging dialogues. For writers, publishers, printers, and artists, bringing such books into the world changed the lives of those involved in their production. The process of publication, a risky business in itself, forged lively social networks centered on making and reading these treatises.

    Brilliant Discourse follows the story of the Roman illustrated book from the printed page back out to the Renaissance streets, piazzas, palaces, convents, and bookshops where these expensive publications, carefully shepherded through the press, acted in the real world to create lively communities of readers and viewers.

  • Every Twelve Seconds - Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight

    A political scientist goes undercover in a modern industrial slaughterhouse for this twenty-first-century update of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle

    This is an account of industrialized killing from a participant's point of view. The author, political scientist Timothy Pachirat, was employed undercover for five months in a Great Plains slaughterhouse where 2,500 cattle were killed per day--one every twelve seconds. Working in the cooler as a liver hanger, in the chutes as a cattle driver, and on the kill floor as a food-safety quality-control worker, Pachirat experienced firsthand the realities of the work of killing in modern society. He uses those experiences to explore not only the slaughter industry but also how, as a society, we facilitate violent labor and hide away that which is too repugnant to contemplate.

    Through his vivid narrative and ethnographic approach, Pachirat brings to life massive, routine killing from the perspective of those who take part in it. He shows how surveillance and sequestration operate within the slaughterhouse and in its interactions with the community at large. He also considers how society is organized to distance and hide uncomfortable realities from view. With much to say about issues ranging from the sociology of violence and modern food production to animal rights and welfare, Every Twelve Seconds is an important and disturbing work.

  • New England Wildflower Society′s Flora Novae Angliae - A Manual for the Indentification of Native and Naturalized Vascular Plants of New Engl

    An indispensable, fully updated guide for everyone interested in identifying, studying, or conserving the flora of New England

    This comprehensive manual offers accurate, up-to-date, and clear information for identifying New England's remarkable array of tracheophytes (vascular plants, excluding mosses). With fully researched entries on some 3,500 native and nonnative species, the book is the first in decades to provide a complete and correct botanical reference for the region's noncultivated plants. The volume includes many new species not documented in New England before, while also excluding many species that have erroneously appeared in earlier manuals.

    Focusing on the taxonomy and distribution of New England plants, the manual is largely dedicated to identification keys and to species entries that provide scientific name, origin, regional conservation ranking, common name, synonyms, distribution, ecology, and other miscellaneous items of interest. Nearly one-third of the entries are accompanied by helpful black-and-white line illustrations.

    Additional special features:

    • Precise distribution information, accurate to the state level
    • Details on unusual plant groups not included in other sources
    • Reliable and versatile keys for identification
    • Tips on recognizing hybrid plants in the field
    • A companion interactive teaching Web site (under development)
    • Comprehensive glossary

  • The Cost Disease - Why Computers get Cheaper and Health Care doesn′t

    Why are the costs of health care and higher education rising so dramatically? How can we keep them affordable for lower- and middle-income American families?

    The exploding cost of health care in the United States is a source of widespread alarm. Similarly, the upward spiral of college tuition fees is cause for serious concern. In this concise and illuminating book, the well-known economist William J. Baumol explores the causes of these seemingly intractable problems and offers a surprisingly simple explanation. Baumol identifies the "cost disease" as a major source of rapidly rising costs in service sectors of the economy. Once we understand that disease, he explains, effective responses become apparent.

    Baumol presents his analysis with characteristic clarity, tracing the fast-rising prices of health care and education in the United States and other major industrial nations, then examining the underlying causes, which have to do with the nature of providing labor-intensive services. The news is good, Baumol reassures us, because the nature of the disease is such that society will be able to afford the rising costs.

  • The Glassell Colections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston - Masterworks of Pre-Columbian, Idonesian and African Gold

    One of the world's top hundred art collectors, Alfred Glassell (1913-2008), was fascinated by gold, but not for its monetary value. Glassell valued instead the spiritual significance that gold held in many ancient cultures, particularly those of Africa, South America and Indonesia. Over the years, he acquired an astonishing number of artworks, assembling the largest privately held collection of Pre-Columbian gold. From 1997 to 2004, Glassell donated works of African and Indonesian gold to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Upon his death in 2008, he bequeathed his collection of Pre-Columbian gold to the museum. 'Masterworks of Pre-Columbian, Indonesian, and African Gold' explores two hundred of these dazzling works, many published here for the first time. Spanning from 2000 B.C. to A.D. 1600, these precious objects reflect a variety of cultures, such as the Calima, Quimbaya, Sican, Moche and Cocle, and a range of geographic locations, from Mexico to Argentina and from Africa to Indonesia. The book offers fresh insights into the enduring appeal of gold and its artistic manifestations in diverse cultures.

  • The Red Monastery Church: Beauty and Asceticism in Upper Egypt

    The Red Monastery church is the most important extant early Christian monument in Egypt's Nile Valley, and one of the most significant of its period in the Mediterranean region. A decade-long conservation project has revealed some of the best surviving and most remarkable early Byzantine paintings known to date. The church was painted four times during the 5th and 6th centuries, and significant portions of each iconographic program are preserved. Extensive painted ornament also covers the church's elaborate architectural sculpture, echoing the aesthetics found at San Vitale in Ravenna and the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.

    Distinguished contributors from a wide range of disciplines, including art and architectural history, ancient religion, history, and conservation, discuss the church's importance. Topics include late antique aesthetics, early monastic concepts of beauty and ascetic identity, and connections between the center and the periphery in the early Byzantine world. Beautifully illustrated with more than 300 images, this landmark publication introduces the remarkable history and magnificence of the church and its art to the public for the first time.

  • Roberto Capucci - Art into Fashion

    A stunning survey of the work of renowned Italian fashion designer Roberto Capucci

    Italian couturier Roberto Capucci (b. 1930) is revered by contemporary fashion designers for his innovative silhouettes and masterful use of color and materials. Capucci refers to his creations as "studies in form," and draws inspiration from a multitude of sources, including art, architecture, and nature. This beautifully illustrated book, the companion to the first exhibition of Capucci's work in the United States, examines his career from the 1950s to the present in the context of the rise of Italian fashion.

    Capucci's designs first captured the attention of the international press in 1951, when he presented his collection in Florence. Considered one of Italy's greatest talents, he experimented with construction techniques and unconventional materials such as raffia, wire, and stones. He refused to compromise his artistic vision to commercial concerns, and after withdrawing from the formal fashion world in the early 1980s, he presented one collection a year, each in a different city around the world. Featuring more than 80 extraordinary works, including the iconic "sculpture dresses" with their inventive use of pleating, color, and form, Roberto Capucci is a captivating look at this brilliant designer who transcends the conventional line between fashion and art.

  • Hollywood Westerns and American Myth - The Importance of Howard Hawks and John Ford for Political Philosophy

    In this pathbreaking book one of America's most distinguished philosophers brilliantly explores the status and authority of law and the nature of political allegiance through close readings of three classic Hollywood Westerns: Howard Hawks' Red River and John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and The Searchers.

    Robert Pippin treats these films as sophisticated mythic accounts of a key moment in American history: its "second founding," or the western expansion. His central question concerns how these films explore classical problems in political psychology, especially how the virtues of a commercial republic gained some hold on individuals at a time when the heroic and martial virtues were so important. Westerns, Pippin shows, raise central questions about the difference between private violence and revenge and the state's claim to a legitimate monopoly on violence, and they show how these claims come to be experienced and accepted or rejected.

    Pippin's account of the best Hollywood Westerns brings this genre into the center of the tradition of political thought, and his readings raise questions about political psychology and the political passions that have been neglected in contemporary political thought in favor of a limited concern with the question of legitimacy.

  • The Art of Not Being Governed - An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia

    For two thousand years the disparate groups that now reside in Zomia (a mountainous region the size of Europe that consists of portions of seven Asian countries) have fled the projects of the organized state societies that surround them - slavery, conscription, taxes, corvee labour, epidemics and warfare. This book, essentially an anarchist history, is the first-ever examination of the huge literature on state-making whose author evaluates why people would deliberately and reactively remain stateless. Among the strategies employed by the people of Zomia to remain stateless are physical dispersion in rugged terrain; agricultural practices that enhance mobility; pliable ethnic identities; devotion to prophetic, millenarian leaders; and maintenance of a largely oral culture that allows them to reinvent their histories and genealogies as they move between and around states. In accessible language, James Scott - recognized worldwide as an eminent authority in Southeast Asian, peasant, and agrarian studies - tells the story of the peoples of Zomia and their unlikely odyssey in search of self-determination. He redefines our views on Asian politics, history, demographics, and even our fundamental ideas about what constitutes civilization, and challenges us with a radically different approach to history that presents events from the perspective of stateless peoples and redefines state-making as a form of internal colonialism. This new perspective requires a radical reevaluation of the civilizational narratives of the lowland states. Scotts work on Zomia represents a new way to think of area studies that will be applicable to other runaway, fugitive communities, be they Gypsies, Cossacks, tribes fleeing slave raiders, Marsh Arabs, or San-Bushmen. Chosen as A Best Book of 2009, Jesse Walker, managing editor, Reason.

  • The Gateway Arch - A Biography

    The surprising history of the spectacular Gateway Arch in St. Louis, the competing agendas of its supporters, and the mixed results of their ambitious plan

    Rising to a triumphant height of 630 feet, the Gateway Arch in St. Louis is a revered monument to America's western expansion. Envisioned in 1947 but not completed until the mid-1960s, the arch today attracts millions of tourists annually and is one of the world's most widely recognized structures. By weaving together social, political, and cultural history, historian Tracy Campbell uncovers the complicated and troubling history of the beloved structure. This compelling book explores how a medley of players with widely divergent motivations (civic pride, ambition, greed, among others) brought the Gateway Arch to fruition, but at a price the city continues to pay.

    Campbell dispels long-held myths and casts a provocative new light on the true origins and meaning of the Gateway Arch. He shows that the monument was the scheme of shrewd city leaders who sought to renew downtown St. Louis and were willing to steal an election, destroy historic buildings, and drive out local people and businesses to achieve their goal. Campbell also tells the human story of the architect Eero Saarinen, whose prize-winning design brought him acclaim but also charges of plagiarism, and who never lived to see the completion of his vision. As a national symbol, the Gateway Arch has a singular place in American culture, Campbell concludes, yet it also stands as an instructive example of failed urban planning.

  • Four Honest Outlaws - Sala, Ray, Marioni, Gordon + Free DVD

    In this strongly argued and characteristically original book, Michael Fried considers the work of four contemporary artists--video artist and photographer Anri Sala, sculptor Charles Ray, painter Joseph Marioni, and video artist and intervener in movies Douglas Gordon. He shows how their respective projects are best understood as engaging in a variety of ways with some of the core themes and issues associated with high modernism, and indeed with its prehistory in French painting and art criticism from Diderot on. Four Honest Outlaws thus continues the author's exploration of the critical and philosophical territory opened up by his earlier book, the magisterial Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before. It presents a vision of the most important contemporary art as not only not repudiating modernism in the name of postmodernism in any of the latter's many forms and manifestations, but also actually as committed to dialectically renewing certain crucial qualities and values that modernism and premodernism brought to the fore, above all those of presentness and anti-theatricality.

    Four Honest Outlaws takes its title from a line in a Bob Dylan song, "To live outside the law you must be honest," meaning in this case that each of the four artists has found his own unsanctioned path to extraordinary accomplishment, in part by defying the ordinary norms and expectations of the contemporary art world. Filled with stunning images throughout and accompanied by a DVD illustrating works by Sala and Gordon discussed in its pages, Four Honest Outlaws is sure to provoke controversy even as it makes a dramatic bid to further transform the terms in which the art of the present should be understood.

  • Kings, Queens and Courtiers - Art in Early Renaissance France

    This sumptuous catalogue provides an overview of French art circa 1500, a dynamic, transitional period when the country, resurgent after the dislocations of the Hundred Years' War, invaded Italy and all media flourished. What followed was the emergence of a unique art: the fusion of the Italian Renaissance with northern European Gothic styles. Outstanding examples of exquisite and revolutionary works are featured, including paintings, sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, stained glass, tapestries, and metalwork. Exciting new research brings to life court artists Jean Fouquet, Jean Bourdichon, Michel Colombe, Jean Poyer, and Jean Hey (The Master of Moulins), all of whose creations were used by kings and queens to assert power and prestige. Also detailed are the organization of workshops and the development of the influential art market in Paris and patronage in the Loire Valley.

  • How to Rig an Election

    An engrossing analysis of the pseudo-democratic methods employed by despots around the world to retain control

    Contrary to what is commonly believed, authoritarian leaders who agree to hold elections are generally able to remain in power longer than autocrats who refuse to allow the populace to vote. In this engaging and provocative book, Nic Cheeseman and Brian Klaas expose the limitations of national elections as a means of promoting democratization, and reveal the six essential strategies that dictators use to undermine the electoral process in order to guarantee victory for themselves. Based on their firsthand experiences as election watchers and their hundreds of interviews with presidents, prime ministers, diplomats, election officials, and conspirators, Cheeseman and Klaas document instances of election rigging from Argentina to Zimbabwe, including notable examples from Brazil, India, Nigeria, Russia, and the United States--touching on the 2016 election. This eye-opening study offers a sobering overview of corrupted professional politics, while providing fertile intellectual ground for the development of new solutions for protecting democracy from authoritarian subversion.

  • Salvador Dali - The Late Work

    Salvador Dali (1904-1989) was one of the most famous and controversial artists of the twentieth century. Although he was prolific for more than sixty years - creating 1,200 oil paintings, countless drawings, sculptures, theatre and fashion designs, book illustrations, and numerous writings - the nearly universal current critical judgment is that his work reached its zenith in the early 1930s, when he was affiliated with the Surrealist movement. The forty years of work executed after 1940, the bulk of his oeuvre, is often seen as repetitious, reactionary, and overly commercialized. Such criticisms mainly arose from his 1941 reinvention of himself as a classicist, his embrace of Catholicism, and his support for General Franco - postures that distanced him from notions of modernism and the avant-garde. This handsomely illustrated volume focuses on Dalis work after 1940, presenting it as a multifaceted oeuvre that simultaneously drew inspiration from the Old Masters and the contemporary world. Beginning in the late 1930s with the transition from Dalis well-known Surrealist canvases to the classicism he announced in 1941, the volume traces the artists work in illustration, fashion, and theatre, predating commercial ventures by such celebrity artists as Andy Warhol. Essays evaluate the significance of Dalis nuclear mysticism of the 1950s, his enduring interest in science, optical effects and illusionism, his collaborations with photographer Philippe Halsman (and his brief forays into Hollywood to work with Alfred Hitchcock and Walt Disney), and visit the two major repositories of his work at the Dali Theatre-Museum in Figueres and the Salvador Dali Museum in St. Petersburg.

  • Carrying Coca

    Coca bags, or chuspas, represent one of the most enduring and resilient forms in the rich history of Andean weaving traditions. These small, elaborately decorated bags have been a constant presence in the archaeological, written, and visual record of the Andes for at least 1,500 years. In the details of their design and decoration, chuspa styles are testament to centuries of shifting trends and technologies in Andean textile arts. However, as carriers of coca leaves, chuspas are much more than aesthetically pleasing and technically sophisticated artworks. For millennia coca leaves have occupied an essential and unparalleled place in the daily lives, social customs, and ritual practices of Andean communities, in which chuspas also play central roles owing to their actual and symbolic connection with coca. Worldwide reactions to the plant and legislation of its uses have affected Andean traditions surrounding coca leaves since the Spanish conquest of the Andes in the sixteenth century and continue into the present.

    Focusing on the collection of the American Museum of Natural History and examples from other museum collections around the world, this book examines the multifaceted history of coca bags, investigating their function and reception and the changes in their appearance. The book reveals how their history is a consequence not only of variations in Andean textile traditions, but also of the story of the sacred and contested substance they carry.


  • Twentieth Century

    ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF IRELAND is an authoritative and fully illustrated survey that encompasses the period from the early Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. The five volumes explore all aspects of Irish art from high crosses to installation art, from illuminated manuscripts to Georgian houses and Modernist churches, from tapestries and sculptures to oil paintings, photographs and video art. This monumental project provides new insights into every facet of the strength, depth and variety of Ireland's artistic and architectural heritage. TWENTIETH CENTURY An examination of the works of art created in twentieth-century Ireland and the critical contexts from which they came. Focusing on painting, photography and new media, rather than on sculpture, this volume considers the work of conceptual and digital artists as well as those who have used more traditional approaches. Definitive biographies of many of the key artist of the era are included, and the volume also addresses the main political and social issues that lay behind twentieth century Irish art. Through its many fine illustrations, it recreates the vibrancy of the art world of the period.

  • Curiosity

    Curiosity has been seen through the ages as the impulse that drives our knowledge forward and the temptation that leads us toward dangerous and forbidden waters. The question 'Why?' has appeared under a multiplicity of guises and in vastly different contexts throughout the chapters of human history. Why does evil exist? What is beauty? How does language inform us? What defines our identity? What is our responsibility to the world? In this book, Alberto Manguel's most personal work to date, the author tracks his own life of curiosity through the books that have mapped his way. Manguel chooses as his guides a selection of writers who sparked his imagination in new directions. He dedicates each chapter to a single thinker, scientist, artist, or other figure who demonstrated in a fresh way how to ask 'Why?' Leading us through a full gallery of inquisitives, among them Thomas Aquinas, David Hume, Lewis Carroll, Rachel Carson, Socrates, and, most importantly, Dante, Manguel affirms how deeply connected our curiosity is to the readings that most astonish us, and how essential to the soaring of our own imaginations.

  • Kem Weber, Designer and Architect

    The first major look at the renowned industrial designer and architect, who helped to shape the look of American modernism from the 1920s through the early 1950s

    For German-born Kem Weber (1889-1963), design was not about finding a new expression; it was about responding to "structural, economic, and social requirements . . . characteristic of our daily routine of living." He sought to ensure that each design he produced--whether a piece of furniture or a building or an interior--was an improvement that responded to modern needs and modern life. Weber was a leading figure of modernism on the West Coast from the 1920s through the early 1950s, and his work greatly influenced the California style of the time. His most iconic designs were his Bentlock line, the Air Line chair, the interiors for the Bixby House, and his tubular-steel furniture for Lloyd.

    This book, a result of significant new primary research in the Weber family's archives, represents the first major study of the life and career of this important designer. Christopher Long details the full range of Weber's contributions, focusing particularly on the part he played in the advancement of American modernism, and his role in heralding a new way of making and living.

  • Rituals of Rented Island - Object Theater, Loft Performance and the New Psychodrama - Manhattan, 1970-1980

    This important volume explores three unique performance art practices of the 1970s and early 1980s: 'object theater' (in which artists engage directly with the objects in the world around them); 'loft performance' (where artists performed in lofts, storefronts and the alternative spaces of New York's SoHo); and 'new psychodrama' (in which artists drew on formal performance modes to explore everyday experience). By tracing the paths of such artists as Stuart Sherman, Julia Heyward, Jared Bark and Jill Kroesen, this catalogue makes newly visible a critical period in the development of performance art. 'Rituals of Rented Island' examines the disparate yet related practices of the artists mentioned above alongside those of the notorious Kipper Kids; composer-musician John Zorn; and legendary playwright and filmmaker Jack Smith; among others. With an array of previously unpublished images, including installation photographs, posters and other ephemera, drawn from the artists' own archives, this volume illuminates the eccentric singularities of the performance art of this era and its relevance today.

  • The Brazen Plagiarist - Selected Poems

    Kiki Dimoula's poetry--the most praised and prized in contemporary Greek literature--is a paradox, both mysteriously intricate and widely popular. Her magic lens defamiliarizes all that is familiar, compressing distances between far-flung realms, conflating concrete and abstract, literal and metaphorical, physical and metaphysical. Exacting and oracular at once, Dimoula superimposes absurdity on rationality, caustic irony on dark melancholy.

    This first English translation of a wide selection of poems from across Dimoula's oeuvre brings together some of her most beguiling, arresting, and moving work. The demands on her translators are considerable. Dimoula plays with the Greek language, melds its levels of diction, challenges its grammar and syntax, and bends its words, by twisting their very shape and meaning. Cecile Inglessis Margellos and Rika Lesser, Dimoula's award-winning translators, have re-created her style's uncanny effect of refraction: when plunged into the water of her poetry, all these bent words suddenly and astonishingly appear perfectly straight.

  • Silent Partners - Artist and Mannquin from Function to Fetish

    The articulated human figure made of wax or wood has been a common tool in artistic practice since the 16th century. Its mobile limbs enable the artist to study anatomical proportion, fix a pose at will, and perfect the depiction of drapery and clothing. Over the course of the 19th century, the mannequin gradually emerged from the studio to become the artist's subject, at first humorously, then in more complicated ways, playing on the unnerving psychological presence of a figure that was realistic, yet unreal--lifelike, yet lifeless. Silent Partners locates the artist's mannequin within the context of an expanding universe of effigies, avatars, dolls, and shop window dummies. Generously illustrated, this book features works by such artists as Poussin, Gainsborough, Degas, Courbet, Cezanne, Kokoschka, Dali, Man Ray, and others; the astute, perceptive text examines their range of responses to the uncanny and highly suggestive potential of the mannequin.

  • C.S Lewis′s Lost Aeneid - Arms and the Exile

    C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) is best remembered as a literary critic, essayist, theologian, and novelist, and his famed tales The Chronicles of Narnia and The Screwtape Letters have been read by millions. Now, A. T. Reyes reveals a different side of this diverse man of letters: translator.

    Reyes introduces the surviving fragments of Lewis's translation of Virgil's epic poem, which were rescued from a bonfire. They are presented in parallel with the Latin text, and are accompanied by synopses of missing sections, and an informative glossary, making them accessible to the general reader. Writes Lewis in A Preface to Paradise Lost, "Virgil uses something more subtle than mere length of time.... It is this which gives the reader of the Aeneid the sense of having lived through so much. No man who has read it with full perception remains an adolescent." Lewis's admiration for the Aeneid, written in the 1st century BC and unfolding the adventures of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of the Romans, is evident in his remarkably lyrical translation.

    C. S. Lewis's Lost Aeneid is part detective story, as Reyes recounts the dramatic rescue of the fragments and his efforts to collect and organize them, and part illuminating look at a lesser-known and intriguing aspect of Lewis's work.

  • Law and the Unconscious: A Psychoanalytic Perspective

    How do we bring the law into line with people's psychological experience?

    How can psychoanalysis help us understand irrational actions and bad choices? Our legal system relies on the idea that people act reasonably and of their own free will, yet some still commit crimes with a high likelihood of being caught, sign obviously one-sided contracts, or violate their own moral codes--behavior many would call fundamentally irrational.

    Anne Dailey shows that a psychoanalytic perspective grounded in solid clinical work can bring the law into line with the reality of psychological experience. Approaching contemporary legal debates with fresh insights, this original and powerful critique sheds new light on issues of overriding social importance, including false confessions, sexual consent, threats of violence, and criminal responsibility. By challenging basic legal assumptions with a nuanced and humane perspective, Dailey shows how psychoanalysis can further our legal system's highest ideals of individual fairness and systemic justice.

  • Winslow Homer - The Clark Collection

    Winslow Homer (1836-1910) is one of the core figures of 19th-century American art. While most well-known for his oil paintings of Civil War scenes and the windswept Atlantic coastline, Homer's oeuvre encompasses a variety of themes, ranging from childhood games through the life-and-death struggles of man and nature. The Clark Art Institute holds one of the greatest collections of Homer's work across all media, including wood engravings, etchings, watercolors, drawings, and paintings from nearly all phases of his career. The collection was assembled predominately by Robert Sterling Clark (1877-1956), who purchased his first Winslow Homer painting in 1915, followed by Two Guides in 1916 and maintained a passion for the artist throughout the rest of his collecting career, acquiring the small oil Playing a Fish in 1955.

    This book examines Robert Sterling Clark as a collector of Homer and the Clark's extensive holdings of the artist. Over thirty entries discuss the role of individual works in Homer's oeuvre and their larger significance to the art world. An illustrated checklist provides information on titles, dates, and media for the entire collection.

  • Owning The Past - Why the English Collected Antique Scultpure, 1640-1840

    In a lively re-examination of the British collectors who bankrupted themselves to possess antique marble statues, Owning the Past chronicles a story of pride, rivalry, snobbery, and myopic obsession with posterity and possession. Analyzing the motives that drove "Marble Mania" in England from the 17th through the early 19th century, Ruth Guilding examines how the trend of collecting antique sculpture entrenches the ideals of connoisseurship and taste, exacerbates socioeconomic inequities, and serves nationalist propaganda. Even today, for the individuals or regimes that possess them, classical statuary performs as a symbol of authority or as the trophies of a "civilized" power. From Adolf Hitler posing for the press beside an ancient copy of Myron's Discobolus to the 2002 sale of the Newby Venus for a record price of about $13 million to the Emir of Qatar, marble mania remains unabated. With insider access to private collections, Guilding writes with verve and searing insight into this absorbing fixation.

  • Between Action and the Unknown - The Art of Kazuo Shiraga and Sadamasa Motonaga

    This comprehensive book is the first in English to examine two of the most successful and important postwar Japanese artists, Kazuo Shiraga (1924-2008) and Sadamasa Motonaga (1922-2011). During an 18-year engagement with the Gutai Art Association, both artists experimented with unorthodox techniques, such as Motonaga's use of smoke and water, or Shiraga's method of painting with his feet. Relatively little, however, is known in the West about Shiraga and Motonaga beyond their involvement with Gutai. Essays aim to assert the importance of Shiraga's and Motonaga's post-Gutai careers--when they pursued exciting new styles and themes in their work--as well as to evaluate the legacy of Japan's postwar avant-garde. Never-before-translated interviews with the artists, incisive essays by experts in the field, and a beautiful color plate section featuring many works never before seen outside of Japan complete this impressive catalogue.

  • Fractal Worlds: Grown, Built, and Imagined

    Fractal geometry is a uniquely fascinating area of mathematics, exhibited in a range of shapes that exist in the natural world, from a simple broccoli floret to a majestic mountain range. In this essential primer, mathematician Michael Frame--a close collaborator with Benoit Mandelbrot, the founder of fractal geometry--and poet Amelia Urry explore the amazing world of fractals as they appear in nature, art, medicine, and technology. Frame and Urry offer new insights into such familiar topics as measuring fractal complexity by dimension and the life and work of Mandelbrot. In addition, they delve into less-known areas: fractals with memory, the Mandelbrot set in four dimensions, fractals in literature, and more. An inviting introduction to an enthralling subject, this comprehensive volume is ideal for learning and teaching.

  • Caravaggio′s Cardsharps - Trickery and Illusion

    The Cardsharps, one of the paintings that launched Caravaggio's spectacular career in Rome, captured the turbulent social reality of the city in the 1590s. This early masterpiece not only documented one of the everyday activities of Rome's citizens, but its vivid, lifelike style also opened the door to a revolutionary naturalism that would spread throughout Europe.

    Helen Langdon, the scholar whose illuminating Caravaggio: A Life became a best-seller, returns to her subject and his milieu in this new, richly illustrated volume. She sets Caravaggio's Cardsharps within the context of contemporaneous literature, art theory, and theater and incorporates new archival research to enliven our understanding of the painter's time, place, and contemporaries. By fully analyzing one of Caravaggio's most daringly novel works, Langdon demonstrates the significant influence he had on the future of European art.

  • Petah Coyne - Everything That Rises Must Converge

    Unlike many contemporary artists who focus on social or media-related issues, Petah Coyne (b. 1953) imbues her work with a magical quality to evoke intensely personal associations. Her sculptures convey an inherent tension between vulnerability and aggression, innocence and seduction, beauty and decadence, and, ultimately, life and death. In her darkly beautiful sculptural installations, often described as lush and dreamlike, she uses unusual and eclectic materials like hay, black sand, wax, satin ribbons, artificial flowers, white powder, and taxidermy animals. Petah Coyne: Everything that Rises Must Converge features works spanning the past decade, among them pieces that incorporate literary themes from sources as diverse as Southern writer Flannery OConnor (who inspired the current books title), Japanese novelist Yasunari Kawabata, and medieval poet Dante. Additional works take their inspiration from filmmakers such as Yasuhiro Ozu and Michelangelo Antonioni. Also presented are a series of ghostly photographs featuring blurred figures of children and Buddhist monks. The book includes an interview between Petah Coyne and Rebecca Solnit and an original short story by A. M. Homes that responds to the themes and narratives in Coynes work.

  • Plumes - Ostrich Feathers, Jews and a Lost World of Global Commerce

    The thirst for exotic ornament among fashionable women in the metropoles of Europe and America prompted a bustling global trade in ostrich feathers that flourished from the 1880s until the First World War. When feathers fell out of fashion with consumers, the result was an economic catastrophe for many, a worldwide feather bust. In this remarkable book, Sarah Stein draws on rich archival materials to bring to light the prominent and varied roles of Jews in the feather trade. She discovers that Jews fostered and nurtured the trade across the global commodity chain and throughout the far-flung territories where ostriches were reared and plucked, and their feathers were sorted, exported, imported, auctioned, wholesaled, and finally manufactured for sale. From Yiddish-speaking Russian-Lithuanian feather handlers in South Africa to London manufacturers and wholesalers, from rival Sephardic families whose feathers were imported from the Sahara and traded across the Mediterranean, from New Yorks Lower East Side to entrepreneurial farms in the American West, Stein explores the details of a remarkably vibrant yet ephemeral culture. This is a singular story of global commerce, colonial economic practices, and the rise and fall of a glamorous luxury item.

  • Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Detroit

    A landmark publication focusing on both Rivera and Kahlo during a critical year in each of their careers

    From April 1932 through March 1933, Diego Rivera (1886-1957) and Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) spent a dramatic and pivotal sojourn in Detroit. Against the backdrop of the Great Depression and amid labor protests in the city, Rivera created his Detroit Industry murals, one of the most important and accomplished works of art made in the United States in the 20th century, for the Detroit Institute of Arts. Kahlo, meanwhile, developed her own artistic identity almost unnoticed, emerging with an oeuvre of extraordinarily expressive work.

    For this beautifully illustrated catalogue, Mark Rosenthal and a team of scholars have written essays that examine the artists, the city of Detroit in this period, and the commissioning of the murals by Edsel Ford, the patron, and William Valentiner, then director of the museum. Rivera's cartoons for the murals are highlighted along with new archival research conducted by Rivera's grandson, Juan Rafael Coronel Rivera. Featuring more than 100 color illustrations of works by both artists, this book presents Detroit as a profoundly important place for the artistic development of Rivera and Kahlo.

  • The Origins of Classical Architecture - Temples, Orders and Gifts to the Gods in Ancient Greece

    Greek temples captivate anyone with an interest in antiquity, and the Doric, Ionic and Corinthian columnar orders that clad them launched the classical architectural tradition down to modern times. The Origins of Classical Architecture proposes groundbreaking new theories in both areas as it elucidates the nature and function of Greek architecture. While contextualizing past debate and prevailing, frequently evolutionary assumptions, Mark Wilson Jones explains how the orders emerged over a relatively short period in response to cultural developments, human agency, and artistic inspiration. Temples were houses for the gods while also considered as offerings to them, and thus made appropriately from enduring materials and grandly scaled. These structures, furthermore, sheltered votive offerings of great artistic quality, the design of which influenced that of the temples and the creation of the new architectural forms. Temples and their orders thereby symbolized the dedication of effort and artistry to the cause of religious expression and collective identity.

  • Fine Lines: Vladimir Nabokov's Scientific Art

    The first comprehensive, interdisciplinary accounting of Nabokov's scientific work, its significance in his artistry, and his contribution to evolutionary theory

    This landmark book is the first full appraisal of Vladimir Nabokov's long-neglected contributions as a scientist. Although his literary achievements are renowned, until recently his scientific discoveries were ignored or dismissed by many. Nabokov created well over 1,000 technical illustrations of the anatomical structures of butterflies, seeking to understand the evolutionary diversity of small butterflies called Blues. But only lately have scientists confirmed his meticulous research and vindicated his surprising hypotheses.

    This volume reproduces 154 of Nabokov's drawings, few of which have ever been seen in public, and presents essays by ten leading scientists and Nabokov specialists. The contributors underscore the significance of Nabokov's drawings as scientific documents, evaluate his visionary contributions to evolutionary biology and systematics, and offer insights into his unique artistic perception and creativity.

  • Hitler′s Hangman - The Life of Heydrich

    Reinhard Heydrich is widely recognized as one of the great iconic villains of the twentieth century, an appalling figure even within the context of the Nazi leadership. Chief of the Nazi Criminal Police, the SS Security Service, and the Gestapo, ruthless overlord of Nazi-occupied Bohemia and Moravia, and leading planner of the 'Final Solution', Heydrich played a central role in Hitler's Germany. He shouldered a major share of responsibility for some of the worst Nazi atrocities, and up to his assassination in Prague in 1942, he was widely seen as one of the most dangerous men in Nazi Germany. Yet Heydrich has received remarkably modest attention in the extensive literature of the Third Reich. Robert Gerwarth weaves together little-known stories of Heydrich's private life with his deeds as head of the Nazi Reich Security Main Office. Fully exploring Heydrich's progression from a privileged middle-class youth to a rapacious mass murderer, Gerwarth sheds new light on the complexity of Heydrich's adult character, his motivations, the incremental steps that led to unimaginable atrocities, and the consequences of his murderous efforts toward recreating the entire ethnic makeup of Europe.

  • Legacy - The Emily Fisher Landau Collection

    In May 2010, New York philanthropist Emily Fisher Landau promised 370 works by more than 85 artists to the Whitney Museum of American Art. This handsome volume highlights each of the artists in the gift, including Carl Andre, Jasper Johns, Willem de Kooning, Ed Ruscha, Lorna Simpson, Kiki Smith, Andy Warhol, and other seminal figures.
    Much more than simply a record of the pledge, Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection showcases the best of the art made in the United States during the past five decades. Informative entries, written by the museum's curators and other scholars, cover all works in the gift and are accompanied by 125 stunning color plates. Also included are an essay on the nature of collecting by Donna De Salvo and a full-color checklist of the entire gift.

  • J.B. Fischer Von Erlach - Architecture as Theater in the Baroque Era

    Though little known in the English-speaking world, Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach (1656-1723) was one of the most important and influential European baroque architects. The buildings that he designed for the emperor of Austria and his courtiers reveal an element of theatricality--an element that author Esther Gordon Dotson probes in this attractive volume.

    In his architectural designs, Fischer incorporated devices from ceremonial pageantry and scene design, controlled lighting effects, and a sense of dramatic progression in approaching and moving through a building. Dotson identifies these various elements in her close reading of Fischer's structures, and splendid new photographs, taken by Mark Richard Ashton, bring them to life on the printed page. The author also delves into Fischer's past and his writings to explain the impact his awareness of architectural history, his early employment by designers of street-festival pageants and his relationships with others involved in such staged productions had upon his architectural designs. Dotson guides readers in discovering the theatrical qualities in Fischer's buildings, illuminating their conceptual liveliness, variety, drama, and enduring beauty.

  • Heretics and Believers: A History of the English Reformation

    Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall's sweeping new history-the first major overview for general readers in a generation-argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of "reform" in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora's Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life. With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of "religion" itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.

  • Jeff Koons - A Retrospective

    Examining the breadth and depth of thirty-five years of work by Jeff Koons (b. 1955), one of the most influential and controversial artists of the 20th century, this highly anticipated volume features all of his most famous pieces. In an engaging overview essay, Scott Rothkopf carefully examines the evolution of Koons' work and his development over the past thirty-five years, offering a fresh scholarly perspective on the artist's multi-faceted career. In addition, short essays by a wide range of interdisciplinary contributors - from academics to novelists - probe provocative topics such as celebrity and media, markets and money, and technology and fabrication. Also included are preparatory sketches and plans for sculptures and paintings as well as installation photographs that shed light on Koons' artistic process and trace the development of his work throughout his landmark career. Koons has risen to international fame making art that reimagines and recontextualizes images and objects from popular culture such as vacuum cleaners, basketballs, and balloon animals. Created with painstaking attention to detail by a team of fabricators, these objects raise questions about taste and popular culture, and position Koons as one of the most lauded and criticized artists working today.

  • Munch : Van Gogh

    A beautiful and insightful examination of the parallels between two of the 19th century's most famous artists

    The affinities between Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) and Edvard Munch (1863-1944) have long been noted, yet a formal comparative study of the two artists has never been made. Known for emotionally charged paintings, deeply personal and innovative styles, and dramatic lives of hardship, both Van Gogh and Munch fundamentally shaped the modern art movement in late-19th-century Europe. Munch: Van Gogh is the first publication to compare these two infamous and influential artists side by side, offering a groundbreaking critical examination of the parallels between their oeuvres and artistic ambitions. Gorgeously illustrated, the book offers a close consideration of the artists' uses of color, stylization, brushwork, and unconventional compositions in both paintings and drawings. The authors also draw connections between Van Gogh's and Munch's evocative and poignant correspondence with family and friends, allowing readers to understand more profoundly the essence of their art.

  • New Treatise on the Uniqueness of Consciousness

    This book, the first English translation of what many consider to be the most original work of Chinese philosophy produced in the twentieth century, draws from Buddhist and Confucian philosophy to develop a critical inquiry into the relation between the ontological and the phenomenal. This annotated edition examines Xiong Shili's complex engagement with Buddhist thought and the legacy of Xiong's thought in New Confucian philosophy. It will be an indispensable resource for students of Eastern philosophy and Chinese intellectual history, as well as for philosophers who may not be familiar with the Chinese tradition.

  • The Death of the Shtetl

    In this book Yehuda Bauer, an internationally-acclaimed Holocaust historian, recounts the destruction of the shtetls, small Jewish towns in Poland and Russia, at the hands of the Nazis in 1941-1942. Bauer brings together all available documents, testimonies, and scholarship, including previously unpublished material from the Yad Vashem archives, pertaining to nine representative shtetls. In line with his belief that history is the story of real people in real situations, Bauer tells the moving stories of individual people and communities. Over a million people, approximately a quarter of all victims of the Holocaust came from the shtetls. Bauer writes of the relations between Jews and non-Jews throughout the period (including the actions of rescuers); he describes attempts to create underground resistance groups, escapes to the forests, and Jewish participation in the Soviet partisan movement. Bauers book is a definitive examination of the demise of the shtetls, a topic of vast importance to the history of the Holocaust.

  • Olmec - Colossal Masterworks of Ancient Mexico

    Considered the mother culture of Mesoamerica, the Olmec developed an iconic and sophisticated artistic style as early as the second millennium B.C.. This pre-Columbian civilization, which flourished in the Mexican states of Veracruz and Tabasco between 1400 and 400 B.C., is best known for the creation of colossal stone portrait heads of its rulers, some weighing up to 24 tons, the monumental heads are among ancient Americas most inspiring and beautiful masterpieces. In the fifteen years since the last major study of the Olmec, archaeologists have made significant finds at key sites in Mexico. This sweeping project brings together the most recent scholarship, along with a diverse selection of more than 100 monuments, sculptures, adornments, masks, and vessels, many of which have never travelled beyond Mexicos borders, that paint a rich portrait of life in the most important Olmec centers, including San Lorenzo, La Venta, and Tres Zapotes. Particular attention is paid to the emergence of the culture, distinctive variations in the art of different city sites, and the chronology and reach of the society during its apex. Centering on the concept of discovery, this wide-ranging volume presents a fresh look at Olmec civilization, recapturing the excitement that greeted the unearthing of the first colossal stone head in 1862.

  • Painters and Paintings in the Early American South

    This beautifully illustrated volume presents the complex ways in which the lives of artists, clients, and sitters were interconnected in the early American South. During this period, paintings included not only portraits, but also seascapes, landscapes, and pictures made by explorers and naturalists.

    The first comprehensive study of this subject, Painters and Paintings in the Early American South draws upon materials including diaries, correspondence, and newspapers in order to explore the stylistic trends of the period and the lives of the sitters, as gentility spread from the wealthiest southerners to the middle class. Featuring works by John Singleton Copley, Charles Willson Peale, and Benjamin West, among many others, this important book examines the training and status of painters, the distinction between fine art and the mechanical arts, the popularity of portraiture, and the nature of clientele between 1540 and 1790, providing a new, critical understanding of the history of art in the American South.

  • William Henry Fox Talbot - Beyond Photography

    William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877) was a British pioneer in photography, yet he also embraced the wider preoccupations of the Victorian Age--a time that saw many political, social, intellectual, technical, and industrial changes. His manuscripts, now in the archive of the British Library, reveal the connections and contrasts between his photographic innovations and his investigations into optics, mathematics, botany, archaeology, and classical studies.

    Drawing on Talbot's fascinating letters, diaries, research notebooks, botanical specimens, and photographic prints, distinguished scholars from a range of disciplines, including historians of science, art, and photography, broaden our understanding of Talbot as a Victorian intellectual and a man of science.

  • Suspended Sentences - Three Novellas

    A trio of intertwined novellas from the 2014 Nobel laureate for literature

    In this essential trilogy of novellas by the winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature, French author Patrick Modiano reaches back in time, opening the corridors of memory and exploring the mysteries to be encountered there. Each novella in the volume--Afterimage, Suspended Sentences, and Flowers of Ruin--represents a sterling example of the author's originality and appeal, while Mark Polizzotti's superb English-language translations capture not only Modiano's distinctive narrative voice but also the matchless grace and spare beauty of his prose.

    Although originally published separately, Modiano's three novellas form a single, compelling whole, haunted by the same gauzy sense of place and characters. Modiano draws on his own experiences, blended with the real or invented stories of others, to present a dreamlike autobiography that is also the biography of a place. Orphaned children, mysterious parents, forgotten friends, enigmatic strangers--each appears in this three-part love song to a Paris that no longer exists.

    Shadowed by the dark period of the Nazi Occupation, these novellas reveal Modiano's fascination with the lost, obscure, or mysterious: a young person's confusion over adult behavior; the repercussions of a chance encounter; the search for a missing father; the aftershock of a fatal affair. To read Modiano's trilogy is to enter his world of uncertainties and the almost accidental way in which people find their fates.

  • Dawn of Egyptian Art

    The cultural icons of Pharaonic Egypt, from the Great Sphinx at Giza to the famous burial of Tutankhamun, are among the world's most renowned works of art. Less well known, but equally impressive, are the rare and ancient images of people, animals, and landscapes made by the Egyptians who lived prior to the age of the pharaohs, when the formal conventions of Egyptian art had not yet fully evolved. With illustrations of more than 180 objects created from about 4000 to 2650 BC, Dawn of Egyptian Art presents the art forms and iconography in which the early Egyptians recorded their beliefs about the land where they lived, the yearly events that took place there, and what they thought was important to the eternal survival of their world. Comprehensive texts explore the origins and early development of the culture of ancient Egypt while discussing the relationship between image and writing as well as the representation of the self and the universe.

  • Francis Picabia Catalogue Raisonne V 1

    This publication is the first of four volumes in the catalogue raisonne of Francis Picabia (1879-1953), one of the most significant, challenging artists of the 20th century. The works in Volume I range from Picabia's early pieces as an Impressionist in the 1890s to his Cubist and abstract paintings of 1912-14, which constitute landmarks in the history of modern art. This volume allows for new critical and scientific readings of his work and piques interest in his lesser-known pieces. Along with illustrations of each featured work, the book includes an introduction, chronology, bibliography, list of exhibitions, and indices.


  • Learn to Read Latin - Workbooks - Part 1

    Learn to Read Latin helps students acquire an ability to read and appreciate the great works of Latin literature as quickly as possible. It not only presents basic Latin morphology and syntax with clear explanations and examples but also offers direct access to unabridged passages drawn from a wide variety of Latin texts. As beginning students learn basic forms and grammar, they also gain familiarity with patterns of Latin word order and other features of style.

    Learn to Read Latin

    • is designed to be comprehensive and requires no supplementary materials
    • explains English grammar points and provides drills especially for today's students
    • offers sections on Latin metrics
    • includes numerous unaltered examples of ancient Latin prose and poetry
    • incorporates selections by authors such as Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, Catullus, Vergil, and Ovid, presented chronologically with introductions to each author and work
    • offers a comprehensive workbook that provides drills and homework assignments.
    This enlarged second edition improves upon an already strong foundation by streamlining grammatical explanations, increasing the number of syntax and morphology drills, and offering additional short and longer readings in Latin prose and poetry.

  • The Geonim of Babylonia and the Shaping of Medieval Jewish Culture

    The Geonic period from about the late sixth to mid-eleventh centuries is of crucial importance in the history of Judaism. The Geonim, for whom this era is named, were the heads of the ancient talmudic academies of Babylonia. They gained ascendancy over the older Palestinian center of Judaism and were recognized as the leading religious and spiritual authorities by most of the world's Jewish population. The Geonim and their circles enshrined the Babylonian Talmud as the central canonical work of rabbinic literature and the leading guide to religious practice, and it was a predominantly Babylonian version of Judaism that was transplanted to newer centers of Judaism in North Africa and Europe. Robert Brody's book--the first survey in English of the Geonic period in almost a century--focuses on the cultural milieu of the Geonim and on their intellectual and literary creativity.

    Brody describes the cultural spheres in which the Geonim were active and the historical and cultural settings within which they functioned. He emphasizes the challenges presented by other Jewish institutions and individuals, ranging from those within the Babylonian Jewish setting--especially the political leadership represented by the Exilarch--to the competing Palestinian Jewish center and to sectarian movements and freethinkers who rejected rabbinic authority altogether. He also describes the variety of ways in which the development of Geonic tradition was affected by the surrounding non-Jewish cultures, both Muslim and Christian.

  • Man Ray Portraits

    A masterful survey of the finest portraits by one of the most inventive photographic artists of the 20th century

    The artist May Ray (1890-1976) initially taught himself photography in order to reproduce his own works of art, but it became one of his preferred mediums. As a contributor to the Dada and Surrealist movements in Paris during the 1920s, Man Ray was perfectly placed to make defining images of his avant-garde contemporaries, including Jean Cocteau, Peggy Guggenheim, and Gertrude Stein. Man Ray also photographed his friends and lovers, among them Kiki de Montparnasse (Alice Prin), Lee Miller, who helped him discover the solarization printing process, and Ady Fidelin. Man Ray continued to take portrait photographs throughout his career, including little-known images from 1940s Hollywood, and of stars such as Ava Gardner and Catherine Deneuve taken during the 1950s and 1960s.

    An essential reference on Man Ray's life and work, this book includes an introduction by Terence Pepper and essay by Marina Warner exploring the artist's creativity and appetite for innovation and experimentation. Complete with first-hand testimonies from the artist's sitters and over 200 beautifully reproduced images, this handsome volume provides a survey of the finest portraits from one of the most inventive photographic artists of the 20th century.

  • A Little History of Science

    A spirited volume on the great adventures of science throughout history, for curious readers of all ages

    Science is fantastic. It tells us about the infinite reaches of space, the tiniest living organism, the human body, the history of Earth. People have always been doing science because they have always wanted to make sense of the world and harness its power. From ancient Greek philosophers through Einstein and Watson and Crick to the computer-assisted scientists of today, men and women have wondered, examined, experimented, calculated, and sometimes made discoveries so earthshaking that people understood the world--or themselves--in an entirely new way.

    This inviting book tells a great adventure story: the history of science. It takes readers to the stars through the telescope, as the sun replaces the earth at the center of our universe. It delves beneath the surface of the planet, charts the evolution of chemistry's periodic table, introduces the physics that explain electricity, gravity, and the structure of atoms. It recounts the scientific quest that revealed the DNA molecule and opened unimagined new vistas for exploration.

    Emphasizing surprising and personal stories of scientists both famous and unsung, A Little History of Science traces the march of science through the centuries. The book opens a window on the exciting and unpredictable nature of scientific activity and describes the uproar that may ensue when scientific findings challenge established ideas. With delightful illustrations and a warm, accessible style, this is a volume for young and old to treasure together.

  • The Rothko Chapel - Writings on Art and the Threshold of the Devine

    This elegant collection commemorates the timeless words and inspired thoughts of Dominique de Menil, a woman whose lifes task was to inspire a better world. With her husband John, Dominique founded the inter-religious Rothko Chapel in Houston in 1971. The de Menils dream was for the Chapel to promote interfaith dialogue, human rights, and the arts. They famously commissioned the artist Mark Rothko to create a suite of paintings specifically for the Chapel. Gathered here is a selection of de Menils thought-provoking speeches, interviews, letters, and other commentaries, beginning with her inaugural address for the Rothko Chapel and concluding with remarks she offered at a human rights award ceremony in 1997. The writings testify to de Menils profound belief in the transcendent dimension of life and in the motivating power of the principles of truth and justice. More relevant today than ever, her visionary ideas seem both prescient and deeply important in the strife-ridden world of the 21st century.

  • Warner Bros: The Making of an American Movie Studio

    From the prizewinning Jewish Lives series, behind the scenes at the legendary Warner Brothers film studio, where four immigrant brothers transformed themselves into the moguls and masters of American fantasy

    Warner Bros charts the rise of an unpromising film studio from its shaky beginnings in the early twentieth century through its ascent to the pinnacle of Hollywood influence and popularity. The Warner Brothers--Harry, Albert, Sam, and Jack--arrived in America as unschooled Jewish immigrants, yet they founded a studio that became the smartest, toughest, and most radical in all of Hollywood.

    David Thomson provides fascinating and original interpretations of Warner Brothers pictures from the pioneering talkie The Jazz Singer through black-and-white musicals, gangster movies, and such dramatic romances as Casablanca, East of Eden, and Bonnie and Clyde. He recounts the storied exploits of the studio's larger-than-life stars, among them Al Jolson, James Cagney, Bette Davis, Errol Flynn, Humphrey Bogart, James Dean, Doris Day, and Bugs Bunny. The Warner brothers' cultural impact was so profound, Thomson writes, that their studio became "one of the enterprises that helped us see there might be an American dream out there."

    About Jewish Lives:

    Jewish Lives is a prizewinning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity. Individual volumes illuminate the imprint of Jewish figures upon literature, religion, philosophy, politics, cultural and economic life, and the arts and sciences. Subjects are paired with authors to elicit lively, deeply informed books that explore the range and depth of the Jewish experience from antiquity to the present.

    In 2014, the Jewish Book Council named Jewish Lives the winner of its Jewish Book of the Year Award, the first series ever to receive this award.

    More praise for Jewish Lives:

    "Excellent." -New York Times

    "Exemplary." -Wall Street Journal

    "Distinguished." -New Yorker

    "Superb." -The Guardian

  • Matisse′s Sculpture - The Pinup and the Primitive

    Long perceived as a side pursuit to his celebrated painting career, Henri Matisse's sculpture receives an overdue critical examination in this book. Beginning in 1906, soon after the artist acquired his first African sculpture, Matisse found inspiration in erotic and ethnographic photography, which had become inexpensively mass-produced thanks to advances in halftone technology. Working with these two radically different depictions of the body - one hand carved, the other mechanically made - was a foundational method for Matisse and crucial to the development of his pre-World War I abstraction. Far from a simple narrative of the artist 'discovering' Africa, the highly original readings of 'Matisse's Sculpture' plot new coordinates of study for early twentieth-century primitivism. The book examines the larger constructs of thought at the time, with a penetrating analysis of anthropology, popular erotica, and the visual culture of French colonialism. In addition, it repositions Matisse's sculptural practice, particularly in regard to its investigations of race and sexuality, as a cornerstone of his prolific career.

  • Against the Grain : A Deep History of the Earliest States

    An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available that contradicts the standard narrative for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations

    Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today's states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family--all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction.

    Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the "barbarians" who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.

  • Unfamiliar Streets

    City scenes have been chronicled in photographs since the early 1800s, but street photography as traditionally defined has captured a relatively narrow field of these images. Revolutionizing the history of street photography, Unfamiliar Streets explores the work of Richard Avedon (1923-2004), Charles Moore (1931-2010), Martha Rosler (b. 1943), and Philip-Lorca diCorcia (b. 1951), four American photographers whose careers in fashion, photojournalism, conceptual art, and contemporary art are not usually associated with the genre.

    Bussard's lively and engaging text, a timely response to a growing interest in urban photography, challenges the traditional understanding of street photography and makes original and important connections among urban culture, social history, and the visual arts, constructing a new historical model for understanding street photography. Illustrated with more than one hundred images, this book provides an interpretation of a compelling genre that is as fresh as its consideration of the city streets themselves, sites of commerce, dispossession, desire, demonstration, power, and spectacle.

  • The Leonard Bernstein Letters

    Leonard Bernstein was a charismatic and versatile musician - a brilliant conductor who attained international super-star status, and a gifted composer of Broadway musicals (West Side Story), symphonies (Age of Anxiety), choral works (Chichester Psalms), film scores (On the Waterfront), and much more. Bernstein was also an enthusiastic letter writer, and this book is the first to present a wide-ranging selection of his correspondence. The letters have been chosen for the insights they offer into the passions of his life - musical and personal - and the extravagant scope of his musical and extra-musical activities. Bernstein's letters tell much about this complex man, his collaborators, his mentors, and others close to him. His galaxy of correspondents encompassed, among others, Aaron Copland, Stephen Sondheim, Jerome Robbins, Thornton Wilder, Boris Pasternak, Bette Davis, Adolph Green, Jacqueline Kennedy-Onassis, and family members including his wife Felicia and his sister Shirley. The majority of these letters have never been published before. They have been carefully chosen to demonstrate the breadth of Bernstein's musical interests, his constant struggle to find the time to compose, his turbulent and complex sexuality, his political activities, and his endless capacity for hard work. Beyond all this, these writings provide a glimpse of the man behind the legends: his humanity, warmth, volatility, intellectual brilliance, wonderful eye for descriptive detail, and humour.

  • The Master and His Emissary - The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World 2e

    Now available in a larger format, a fascinating exploration of the differences between the brain's right and left hemispheres and their effects on society, history and culture. Why is the brain divided? The difference between right and left hemispheres has been puzzled over for centuries. In a book of unprecedented scope, Iain McGilchrist draws on a vast body of recent brain research, illustrated with case histories, to reveal that the difference is profound - not just this or that function, but two whole, coherent, but incompatible ways of experiencing the world. The left hemisphere is detail-oriented, prefers mechanisms to living things, and is inclined to self-interest, where the right hemisphere has greater breadth, flexibility and generosity. This division helps explain the origins of music and language, and casts new light on the history of philosophy, as well as on some mental illnesses. In the second part of the book, he takes the reader on a journey through the history of Western culture, illustrating the tension between these two worlds as revealed in the thought and belief of thinkers and artists, from Aeschylus to Magritte. He argues that, despite its inferior grasp of reality, the left hemisphere is increasingly taking precedence in the modern world, with potentially disastrous consequences. This is truly a tour de force that should excite interest in a wide readership.

  • Strindberg - A Life

    A mesmerizing account of the chaotic life and brilliant work of a playwright whose influence is undiminished 100 years after his death

    Novelist, satirist, poet, photographer, painter, alchemist, and hellraiser--August Strindberg was all these, and yet he is principally known, in Arthur Miller's words, as "the mad inventor of modern theater" who led playwriting out of the polite drawing room into the snakepit of psychological warfare. This biography, supported by extensive new research, describes the eventful and complicated life of one of the great literary figures in world literature. Sue Prideaux organizes Strindberg's story into a gripping and highly readable narrative that both illuminates his work and restores humor and humanity to a man often shrugged off as too difficult.

    Best known for his play Miss Julie, Strindberg wrote sixty other plays, three books of poetry, eighteen novels, and nine autobiographies. Even more than most, Strindberg is a writer whose life sheds invaluable light on his work. Prideaux explores Strindberg's many art-life connections, revealing for the first time the originals who inspired the characters of Miss Julie and her servant Jean, the bizarre circumstances in which the play was written, and the real suicide that inspired the shattering ending of the play. Recounting the playwright's journey through the "real" world as well as the world of belief and ideas, Prideaux marks the centenary of Strindberg's death in 1912 with a biography worthy of the man who laid the foundation for Western drama through the twentieth century and even into the twenty-first.

  • Daphne Guinness

    'She is one of the - if not the - most stylish women living', says designer and film director Tom Ford, speaking of Daphne Guinness, the subject and co-author of this extraordinary book. From her platinum-and-black striped hair to her towering 10-inch heels, her to-die-for couture collection and amazing diamond jewellery, Daphne Guinness embodies the rarified, personal style of a true fashion icon. A designer, editor, model, muse and stylist, Ms. Guinness is renowned for the way she uses fashion to transform herself. As her friend, the art historian John Richardson puts it: 'She is the object of her own creativity. Her persona is her own masterpiece'. Karl Lagerfeld of Chanel, Valentino, Azzedine Alaia and the late Alexander McQueen are among the many great fashion designers whose spectacular garments form part of Daphne Guinness' personal collection of haute couture. But Ms. Guinness is far more than a great couture client, she is also an inspiration to designers because of her fearless personal style. In an extended interview with the curator and fashion historian Valerie Steele, 'Daphne Guinness' explains the origins and characteristics of her style. She also discusses her friendships and collaborations with other creative fashion personalities from the late Isabella Blow to the photographer Steven Klein and the jeweller Shaun Leane. Sumptuously illustrated with both high-fashion photographs and paparazzi shots, the book is a spectacular showcase for the world of Daphne Guinness.

  • This Is a Portrait If I Say So: Identity in American Art, 1912 to Today

    The first in-depth exploration of the rise and evolution of abstract, symbolic, and conceptual portraiture in American art

    This groundbreaking book traces the history of portraiture as a site of radical artistic experimentation, as it shifted from a genre based on mimesis to one stressing instead conceptual and symbolic associations between artist and subject. Featuring over 100 color illustrations of works by artists from Charles Demuth, Marcel Duchamp, Marsden Hartley, and Georgia O'Keeffe to Janine Antoni, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Roni Horn, Jasper Johns, and Glenn Ligon, this timely publication probes the ways we think about and picture the self and others. With particular focus on three periods during which non-mimetic portraiture flourished--1912-25, 1961-70, and 1990-the present--the authors investigate issues related to technology, sexuality, artist networks, identity politics, and social media, and explore the emergence of new models for the visual representation of identity.

    Taking its title from a 1961 work by Robert Rauschenberg--a telegram that stated, "This is a portrait of Iris Clert if I say so"--this book unites paintings, sculpture, photography, and text portraits that challenge the genre in significant, often playful ways and question the convention, as well as the limits, of traditional portrayal.

  • Bertrand Goldberg - Architecture of Invention

    Bertrand Goldberg (1913-1997) was a visionary Chicago architect whose designs for housing, urban planning, and industrial design made a distinctive mark in the modern era. This handsome publication, the first to focus in-depth on the entirety of Goldberg's life and work, traces his development from his early Bauhaus training to his notable architectural achievements. Featuring previously unpublished material, it also includes Goldberg's plans for unrealized projects as well as his collaborations with other prominent modern architects, such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Buckminster Fuller.

    Goldberg's interest in the social dimension of architecture was reflected in many of his cutting-edge designs. In 1959, he conceived the plan for his most iconic structure, the sixty-story Marina City residential towers, in the heart of downtown Chicago. He created a number of hospitals that offered a new paradigm for how patients and staff interacted within the space. Goldberg's progressive designs also extended to schools, prefabricated structures, and furniture.

  • French in Action - A Beginning Course in Language and Culture: The Capretz Method, Third Edition, Part 1 Textbook

    Since it was first published, French in Action: A Beginning Course in Language and Culture--The Capretz Method has been widely recognized in the field as a model for video-based foreign-language instructional materials. The third edition has been revised by Pierre Capretz and Barry Lydgate and includes new, contemporary illustrations throughout and more-relevant information for today's students in the Documents sections of each lesson. A completely new feature is a journal by the popular character Marie-Laure, who observes and humorously comments on the political, cultural, and technological changes in the world between 1985 and today. The new edition also incorporates more content about the entire Francophone world. In use by hundreds of colleges, universities, and high schools, French in Action remains a powerful educational resource, and the third edition updates the course for a new generation of learners.

  • Ravel

    This new biography of Maurice Ravel (1875-1937), by one of the leading scholars of nineteenth- and twentieth-century French music, is based on a wealth of written and oral evidence, some newly translated and some derived from interviews with the composer's friends and associates. As well as describing the circumstances in which Ravel composed, the book explores new evidence to present radical views of the composer's background and upbringing, his notorious failure in the Prix de Rome, his incisive and often combative character, his sexual preferences, and his long final illness. It also contains the most detailed account so far published of his hugely successful American tour of 1928. The world of Maurice Ravel--including friendships (and some fallings-out) with Debussy, Faure, Diaghilev, Gershwin, and Toscanini--is deftly uncovered in this sensitive portrait.

  • William Burton Conyngham and His Irish Circle of Antiquarian Artists

    In the midst of a resurgence of pride in Ireland's history during the 18th century, William Burton, later Conyngham (1733-1796), strove to emulate his British counterparts in producing albums of engravings illustrating the beauties of the country's heritage. To further his aims, he formed the Hibernian Antiquarian Society, which lasted only four years due to internal strife. Nevertheless, Burton Conyngham began acquiring drawings of antiquities, and then commissioned Gabriel Beranger and his fellow artists Angelo Bigari and John James Barralet to make sketches of dolmens, churches, abbeys, and castles in areas which were not represented in existing works.

    In its day, Burton Conyngham's was regarded as the most significant collection of such drawings in Ireland. This volume reconstructs that collection, cataloguing more than 600 drawings, which he was known to have secured by about 1780. Also presented in this monograph is the considerable number of copies that were made of the original works as security against damage to the collective whole or the death of its owner.

  • Family in the Picture, 1958-2013

    Designed and conceived to complement In the Picture, his 2011 volume of self-portraits, Lee Friedlander's Family in the Picture is the family album of one of the most restless and inventive figures in the history of photography. The sequence of over 350 pictures begins with images of Friedlander's wife, Maria, at the beginning of their marriage, and interweaves major life events such as births, weddings, and funerals with moments that are less outwardly momentous yet equally moving. Although some of the pictures are well known, the majority of images have only recently been unearthed from Friedlander's personal archive. This compendium of pictures, spanning over a half-century, chronicles the photographer's family with arresting frankness, poignancy, and a moral: that life goes on.

  • The Souls of Black Folk

    This collection of essays by scholar-activist W. E. B. Du Bois is a masterpiece in the African American canon. Du Bois, arguably the most influential African American leader of the early twentieth century, offers insightful commentary on black history, racism, and the struggles of black Americans following emancipation. In his groundbreaking work, the author presciently writes that the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line, and offers powerful arguments for the absolute necessity of moral, social, political, and economic equality. These essays on the black experience in America range from sociological studies of the African American community to illuminating discourses on religion and Negro music, and remain essential reading in our so-called post-racial age. A new introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway explores Du Bois s signature accomplishments while helping readers to better understand his writings in the context of his time as well as ours."

  • Made in the U.S.A. - American Masterworks from the Phillips Collection

    A comprehensive survey of The Phillips Collection's spectacular holdings in American art

    American art has been essential to The Phillips Collection since its founding by Duncan Phillips in 1921. Phillips's collecting interests were decidedly against the grain: he acquired the work of living American artists, especially those outside the mainstream, when it was unpopular to do so and promoted diversity, as seen in works by self-taught artists, artists of color, and naturalized Americans, resulting in a rich assembly of independent-minded artists, including Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, and Georgia O'Keeffe. The Phillips Collection's superb collection of American art, acquired over half a century, is presented here for the first time in a comprehensive overview, featuring 160 works from heroes of the late 19th century--such as William Merritt Chase, Thomas Eakins, and Winslow Homer, who set the course for modern art in America--to abstract expressionists Willem de Kooning, Richard Diebenkorn, Adolph Gottlieb, and Mark Rothko, whose efforts to create a new visual language following World War II brought a new global significance to American art. A perennial guide to this important collection, the book includes scholarly essays on Phillips and on the Rothko Room, introductions to key groups of works in the collection, more than one hundred biographies of the most influential artists represented, and a chronology of Phillip's acquisitions and interactions with American artists.

  • John Sloan - Drawing on Illustration

    The American realist artist John Sloan (1871-1951) is best known for his portrayals of daily life in early 20th-century New York and as a member of The Eight and the Ashcan School, alongside peers like Robert Henri, Everett Shinn, and George Luks. Sloan's artistic approach was shaped by his experience as a commercial illustrator, a type of work that inaugurated his professional career--at newspapers like the Philadelphia Press and later for mass-market magazines--and which he pursued even after he turned his focus to painting. In John Sloan: Drawing on Illustration, Michael Lobel explores the impact of Sloan's illustrating on his wider output, including his paintings, his drawings for the radical journal The Masses, and his response to the watershed 1913 Armory Show. Illuminating the interaction between art and popular culture, this book provides an important new framework for understanding the modern genre of illustration, and in so doing touches on major 20th-century currents, including the rise and expansion of the mass media and the visual legacy of European modernism.

  • Bereavement and Consolation - Testimonies from Tokugawa Japan

    Death came early and often to the people of Tokugawa Japan, as it did to the rest of the pre-modern world. Yet the Japanese reaction to death struck foreign observers and later scholars as particularly subdued. In this pioneering study, Harold Bolitho translates and analyzes some extraordinary accounts written by three Japanese men of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries about the death of a loved one-testimonies that challenge the impression that the Japanese accepted their bereavements with nonchalance. The three accounts were written by a young Buddhist priest mourning the death of his child, by the poet Issa, who recorded his father's final illness, and by a scholar and teacher who described his wife's losing struggle with diabetes. Placing their journals in the context of contemporary religious beliefs, customs and literary traditions, Bolitho offers provocative insights into a previously hidden world of Japanese grief.

  • My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness - A Poet′s Life in the Palestinian Century

    Beautifully written, and composed with a novelist's eye for detail, this book tells the story of an exceptional man and the culture from which he emerged. Taha Muhammad Ali was born in 1931 in the Galilee village of Saffuriyya and was forced to flee during the war in 1948. He travelled on foot to Lebanon and returned a year later to find his village destroyed. An autodidact, he has since run a souvenir shop in Nazareth, at the same time evolving into what one leading American critic has dubbed 'perhaps the most accessible and delightful poet alive today'. As it places Muhammad Ali's life in the context of the lives of his predecessors and peers, 'My Happiness' offers a sweeping depiction of a charged and fateful epoch. It is a work that Arabic scholar Michael Sells describes as 'among the five 'must read' books on the Israel-Palestine tragedy'. In an era when talk of the 'Clash of Civilizations' dominates, this biography offers something else entirely: a view of the people and culture of the Middle East that is rich, nuanced, and above all else, deeply human.

  • Iphigenia in Forest Hills - Anatomy of a Murder Trial

    "Astringent and absorbing. . . . Iphigenia in Forest Hills casts, from its first pages, a genuine spell -- the kind of spell to which Ms. Malcolm's admirers (and I am one) have become addicted."--Dwight Garner, New York Times

    "She couldn't have done it and she must have done it." This is the enigma at the heart of Janet Malcolm's riveting new book about a murder trial in the insular Bukharan-Jewish community of Forest Hills, Queens, that captured national attention. The defendant, Mazoltuv Borukhova, a beautiful young physician, is accused of hiring an assassin to kill her estranged husband, Daniel Malakov, a respected orthodontist, in the presence of their four-year old child. The prosecutor calls it an act of vengeance: just weeks before Malakov was killed in cold blood, he was given custody of Michelle for inexplicable reasons. It is the "Dickensian ordeal" of Borukhova's innocent child that drives Malcolm's inquiry.

    With the intellectual and emotional precision for which she is known, Malcolm looks at the trial--"a contest between competing narratives"--from every conceivable angle. It is the chasm between our ideals of justice and the human factors that influence every trial--from divergent lawyering abilities to the nature of jury selection, the malleability of evidence, and the disposition of the judge--that is perhaps most striking.

    Surely one of the most keenly observed trial books ever written, Iphigenia in Forest Hills is ultimately about character and "reasonable doubt." As Jeffrey Rosen writes, it is "as suspenseful and exciting as a detective story, with all the moral and intellectual interest of a great novel."

    "Iphigenia in Forest Hills is another dazzling triumph from Janet Malcolm. Here, as always, Malcolm's work inspires the best kind of disquiet in a reader--the obligation to think." --Jeffrey Toobin, author of The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court

    "A remarkable achievement that ranks with Malcolm's greatest books. Her scrupulous reporting and interviews with protagonists on both sides of the trial make her own narrative as suspenseful and exciting as a detective story, with all the moral and intellectual interest of a great novel." --Jeffrey Rosen, author of The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America

  • Columbus′s Outpost Among the Tainos - Spain and America at La Isabela 1493-1498

    In 1493 Christopher Columbus led a fleet of seventeen ships and more than twelve hundred men to found a royal trading colony in America. Columbus had high hopes for his settlement, which he named La Isabela after the queen of Spain, but just five years later it was in ruins. It remains important, however, as the first site of European settlement in America and the first place of sustained interaction between Europeans and the indigenous Tainos.

    Kathleen Deagan and Jose Maria Cruxent now tell the story of this historic enterprise. Drawing on their ten-year archaeological investigation of the site of La Isabela, along with research into Columbus-era documents, they contrast Spanish expectations of America with the actual events and living conditions at America's first European town. Deagan and Cruxent argue that La Isabela failed not because Columbus was a poor planner but because his vision of America was grounded in European experience and could not be sustained in the face of the realities of American life. Explaining that the original Spanish economic and social frameworks for colonization had to be altered in America in response to the American landscape and the non-elite Spanish and Taino people who occupied it, they shed light on larger questions of American colonialism and the development of Euro-American cultural identity.

  • Interviews with Artists, 1966-2012

    A renowned curator and respected insider of the international art scene since the mid-1960s, Michael Peppiatt has spent his professional life with many of the greatest artists of the 20th century. His close friendships and frequent studio visits with Dubuffet, Sonia Delaunay, Francis Bacon, Henry Moore, Balthus, Oldenburg, Brassai, and Cartier-Bresson, among many others, have produced an incredible archive of interviews, from formal question-and-answer sessions to off-the-cuff conversations. These interviews combine to give a unique perspective on art from World War II to the present day.

    Peppiatt has selected forty-five of the most noteworthy and fascinating of his conversations with artists, from the world-famous to the under-recognized. The author approaches his subjects with a characteristic mix of passion, insight, and humor in a book that is consistently entertaining and informative, as the artists open up in unexpected ways about their work and their lives.

  • France 1940 - Defending the Republic

    A new perspective on the calamitous fall of France in 1940 and why blame has been misplaced ever since

    In this revisionist account of France's crushing defeat in 1940, a world authority on French history argues that the nation's downfall has long been misunderstood. Philip Nord assesses France's diplomatic and military preparations for war with Germany, its conduct of the war once the fighting began, and the political consequences of defeat on the battlefield. He also tracks attitudes among French leaders once defeat seemed a likelihood, identifying who among them took advantage of the nation's misfortunes to sabotage democratic institutions and plot an authoritarian way forward. Nord finds that the longstanding view that France's collapse was due to military unpreparedeness and a decadent national character is unsupported by fact.

    Instead, he reveals that the Third Republic was no worse prepared and its military failings no less dramatic than those of the United States and other Allies in the early years of the war. What was unique in France was the betrayal by military and political elites who abandoned the Republic and supported the reprehensible Vichy takeover. Why then have historians and politicians ever since interpreted the defeat as a judgment on the nation as a whole? Why has the focus been on the failings of the Third Republic and not on elite betrayal? The author examines these questions in a fascinating conclusion.

  • Shoe Obsession

    An astute exploration of the most outrageous shoe designs of the 21st century

    This fabulously illustrated book explores western culture's fascination with extravagant and fashionable shoes. Over the past decade, shoe design has become increasingly central to fashion, with fashion companies paying ever more attention to shoes and other accessories. High-heeled shoes, in particular, have become the fashion accessory of the 21st century.

    Co-written by one of the world's leading historians of fashion and an authority on fashion accessories, the book features approximately 150 pairs of the most extreme and ultra-fashionable styles of the past 12 years, including work by such prominent designers as Manolo Blahnik, Pierre Hardy, Christian Louboutin and Bruno Frisoni for Roger Vivier, as well as shoes by influential design houses such as Azzedine Alaia, Balenciaga, Alexander McQueen, and Prada. Avant-garde styles by up-and-coming designers such as Japan's Kei Kagami and Noritaka Tatehana are also highlighted.

    Shoe Obsession examines recent extreme and fantastical shoe styles in relation to the history of high heels, the role of shoes as a reflection of their wearers' personality traits, and the importance of shoes in art and exhibitions. The book is lavishly illustrated with full-color photographs of spectacular contemporary shoe designs.

  • Berenice Abbott

    An exemplary study of the career of photographer Berenice Abbott that reveals the astonishing range of her artistic, documentary, and scientific production

    The American photographer Berenice Abbott (1898-1991) is known best for her documentation of New York in the 1930s and for her efforts to gain recognition for the work of Eugene Atget in both Europe and the United States. This attractive book features 120 photographs and a series of rarely seen documents (including letters, book layouts, and periodicals), illuminating the three major periods of Abbott's career: her early work in the United States and Paris during the 1920s; her project Changing New York (1935-39), created for the Federal Art Project; and her scientific pictures made between 1939 and 1961. By detailing Abbott's influences and production both home and abroad, Berenice Abbott underscores the photographer's role as one of the 20th century's most remarkable artists.

    Abbott left the United States in 1921 to study sculpture in Paris, where she was hired by Man Ray in 1923 to be his assistant. She took to photography immediately and by 1926 had set up her own studio. She became famous for her photographs showing bohemian artistic and intellectual life in the city, but in 1929 she returned to the United States and set up a new studio. Her best-known and most influential work, Changing New York, represented both a vast exercise in recording the architecture and urban life of New York and an intensely personal artistic project. Her straightforward method of photography led to her being employed full-time in the 1950s by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston to produce pictures illustrating the laws of physics.

  • Forrest Bess - Seeing things Invisible

    The eccentric visionary artist Forrest Bess (1911-1977) spent most of his life on the Texas coast working as a commercial fisherman. In his spare time, however, he painted prolifically, creating an extraordinary body of work rich with enigmatic symbolism. Bess experienced hallucinations that both frightened and intrigued him, and he incorporated images from these visions into small-scale abstract paintings starting in the mid-1940s.

    His canvases attracted an underground following, and between 1949 and 1967, Betty Parsons organized six solo exhibitions of Bess's work at her prominent New York City gallery. Since then, the art world has periodically rediscovered his work, most recently through a 2012 Whitney Biennial installation by American sculptor Robert Gober, which further exposed Bess's psychological, medical, and religious theories. Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible is the artist's first museum retrospective with catalogue in the United States and offers a fresh look at Bess's work and a better understanding of this curious and complicated artist.

  • The Age of French Impressionism - Masterpieces from the Art Institute of Chicago

    The Art Institute of Chicago houses one of the worlds greatest collections of late-19th-century French art. This stunning book highlights more than 100 of the museums masterpieces, from the bold works of Edouard Manet, an important figure in the transition from Realism to Impressionism, to Claude Monets light-filled paintings - the hallmarks of the period - and Paul Cezannes influential Post-Impressionist canvases. Each beautifully reproduced work is situated in terms of the memorable era in which it was created, and collectively they exemplify the diversity of ideas and extraordinary wealth of talent at work during the remarkable Impressionist period. The publication also features a chronology - illustrated with colour reproductions, archival photographs, and exhibition shots - that documents the history and formation of the Art Institute of Chicagos renowned collection. The Age of French Impressionism offers art enthusiasts a fascinating overview of the Impressionist movement and its legacy.

  • Rene Lalique - Enchanted by Glass

    A visually stunning and informative survey of Lalique's glasswork that includes hundreds of exquisite pieces and related archival material

    Rene Lalique, a master artist and designer of early 20th-century France, initially achieved fame for his jewelry creations that were widely admired and collected. He began experimenting with glass in the 1890s, and was so captivated by the material that he spent the rest of his career working with it exclusively. The glass objects that he designed, such as vases, ashtrays, tableware, and other household accessories, are now considered iconic representations of the Art Nouveau and Art Deco movements.

    This publication traces Lalique's distinguished career, including his early experimentation with glass in jewelry-making; his production of innovative perfume bottles, some of the first pieces he made entirely of glass; and the peak of his glassmaking career at the 1925 International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts in Paris. Hundreds of color photographs--including many dramatic, full-page images--spotlight individual pieces of glass and original wax and plaster models selected from the extensive collection of The Corning Museum of Glass. The book also draws on the Museum's wealth of archival material on Lalique, including design drawings and photographs. This strikingly beautiful and informative volume is a testament to the singular allure of his enchanting glass.

  • Samuel Palmer - Shadows on the Wall

    Samuel Palmer (1805-1881) was one of the leading British landscape painters of the 19th century. Inspired by his mentor, the artist and poet William Blake, Palmer brought a new spiritual intensity to his interpretation of nature, producing works of unprecedented boldness and fervency. Pre-eminent scholar William Vaughan--who organized the Palmer retrospective at the British Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2005--draws on unpublished diaries and letters, offering a fresh interpretation of one of the most attractive and sympathetic, yet idiosyncratic, figures of the 19th century. Far from being a recluse, as he is often presented, Palmer was actively engaged in Victorian cultural life and sought to exert a moral power through his artwork. Beautifully illustrated with Palmer's visionary and enchanted landscapes, the book contains rich studies of his work, influences, and resources. Vaughan also shows how later, enthralled by the Pre-Raphaelite movement, Palmer manipulated his own artistic image to harmonize with it. Little appreciated in his lifetime, Palmer is now hailed as a precursor of modernism in the 20th century.

  • Water 4.0 - The Past, Present, and Future of the World`s Most Vital Resource

    The little-known story of the systems that bring us our drinking water, how they were developed, the problems they are facing, and how they will be reinvented in the near future

    Turn on the faucet, and water pours out. Pull out the drain plug, and the dirty water disappears. Most of us give little thought to the hidden systems that bring us water and take it away when we're done with it. But these underappreciated marvels of engineering face an array of challenges that cannot be solved without a fundamental change to our relationship with water, David Sedlak explains in this enlightening book. To make informed decisions about the future, we need to understand the three revolutions in urban water systems that have occurred over the past 2,500 years and the technologies that will remake the system. The author starts by describing Water 1.0, the early Roman aqueducts, fountains, and sewers that made dense urban living feasible. He then details the development of drinking water and sewage treatment systems--the second and third revolutions in urban water. He offers an insider's look at current systems that rely on reservoirs, underground pipe networks, treatment plants, and storm sewers to provide water that is safe to drink, before addressing how these water systems will have to be reinvented. For everyone who cares about reliable, clean, abundant water, this book is essential reading.

  • Alexander Gardner - The Western Photographs, 1867-1868

    A glimpse into the development of the American West through startling photographs of the frontier landscape and the rich culture of American Indian tribes

    Best known for his Civil War photographs, Alexander Gardner (1821-1882) also created two extraordinary bodies of work depicting the transformation of the American West: Across the Continent on the Kansas Pacific Railway and Scenes in the Indian County. In 1867, after joining the survey team for what became the Kansas Pacific Railroad, Gardner photographed the path of the proposed extension, emphasizing the ease of future railroad construction and economic development, while including studies of American Indians and settlements along the way. The following year, Gardner recorded peace talks with Indian tribes at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. Distinctly sympathetic to the plight of the American Indian, Gardner made candid documentation of individual chiefs, their encampments and daily life, burial trees, and the peace proceedings themselves. With a full catalogue raisonne of these two rare series, Alexander Gardner offers a complete visual index of these remarkable photographs, made at a critical moment in the history of the American West.

  • Byzantium - From Antiquity to the Renaissance

    With images culled from eleven hundred years of history, this comprehensive survey explores the Byzantine empire's vast range of artistic splendors that indelibly informed the art of modern Europe. Renowned scholar Thomas Mathews emphasizes that the Byzantines' interest in humanism and painting the human figure became the essential bridge between classical and renaissance Europe. Starting with a brief history of Byzantium as a basis for understanding Byzantine theology and art, he places the empire's artistic development within a broad cultural and historical context. Featuring more than one hundred color plates of mosaics, metalwork, architecture, frescoes and religious artifacts, as well as maps, diagrams, and a timeline, this definitive work provides a complete yet succinct introduction to the full range of Byzantine art and iconography.

  • Men From The Ministry - Ho Britain Saved Its Heritage

    Between 1900 and 1950 the British state amassed a huge collection of over 800 historic buildings, monuments and historic sites and opened them to the public. Nothing like it had ever been seen before. Of course, collections of paintings, sculptures and books had been made by governments, but the British created an outdoor museum of national history. This book explains why the extraordinary collecting frenzy took place. It locates it in the fragile and nostalgic atmosphere of the interwar years, dominated by neo-romanticism and cultural protectionism. It dissects a government programme that established a modern state on deep historical and rural roots; in the words of the Prime Minister, Stanley Baldwin, heritage was the rock out of which the nation's children would be hewn. The book sets all this activity, for the first time, in its political, economic and cultural contexts, painting a picture of a country traumatized by war, fearful of losing what was left of its history, and a government that actively set out to protect them. In the last chapter it brings the story up to date.

  • The Cy Twombly Gallery: The Menil Collection, Houston

    A visual celebration of one of the most renowned artists of our time, along with the extraordinary Gallery he helped to create to showcase his work

    American artist Cy Twombly (1928-2011) created paintings and sculptures that defied conventional classification. In his works, Twombly incorporated a wide variety of elements, from scrawls and calligraphic marks to text from poetry and mythology. Opening in 1995, the Cy Twombly Gallery at the Menil Collection was designed by Renzo Piano and has become a pilgrimage destination for the artist's avid admirers. The product of close collaboration between the Menil, Twombly, and the Dia Center for the Arts, the Gallery is one of the most extraordinary representations of any single 20th-century artist. Twombly chose the art that would be featured and worked closely with the builders to create the most appropriate venue for its presentation.

    This sumptuous volume showcases thirty-three paintings and eleven sculptures, including an immense 13 x 52-foot painting. Featuring large-scale, close-up details of many of the works, the book looks at paint, plaster, paintings, sculptures, and the "cues" that Twombly gave in his art about this special collection.

  • American Adversaries - West and Copley in a Transatlantic World

    American artists and innovators Benjamin West (1738-1820) and John Singleton Copley (1738-1815) changed the way history was recorded in the 18th century and became America's first transatlantic art superstars. Initially friends but eventually bitter rivals, the artists painted contemporary events as they happened, illustrating the transformation of imperial power through diplomacy between British Americans and the Iroquois, and through transatlantic trade, exploration, and the natural history of the West Indies.

    Focusing on two iconic works, West's The Death of General Wolfe (1770) and Copley's Watson and the Shark (1778), American Adversaries charts the rise of contemporary history painting, and offers a compelling examination of American history and New World exploration. Featuring more than two hundred color reproductions of paintings, works on paper, and objects that informed the artists, this handsome volume also includes essays that shed new light on, among other subjects, West and Copley within the context of the Royal Academy and the use of Western and Native American objects in cultural diplomacy.


  • Raw Painting - "The Butcher′s Shop" by Annibale Carracci

    Born in Bologna, Annibale Carracci (15641609) was one of the most revolutionary artists of the late Renaissance. Even before turning twenty, he rebelled against convention by investing his art with a sense of naturalism uncommon to paintings of the period. His early painting The Butchers Shop, a cherished work in the Kimbell Art Museums collection, marks the beginning of Carraccis artistic journey and remains one of his most powerfully naturalistic works. This fascinating study explores the origins and significance of The Butchers Shop, placing it within the artists own career as well as the broader context of Italian painting. Detailing the uniqueness and vitality of Carraccis style, Dickerson emphasizes the remarkable plein-air quality of the painting and explains how Carracci may have achieved this utterly novel effect, though in fact executing the work indoors in his studio. He also sets Carraccis work in the tradition of butchers shop paintings in Renaissance Italy, analyzes the painting in relation to the reality of the occupation at the time, and investigates where in Bologna such a butchers shop might have stood.

  • The Qur'an and the Bible: Text and Commentary

    A groundbreaking comparative study that illuminates the connections between the Qur'ān and the Bible

    While the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament are understood to be related texts, the sacred scripture of Islam, the third Abrahamic faith, has generally been considered separately. Noted religious scholar Gabriel Said Reynolds draws on centuries of Qur'ānic and Biblical studies to offer rigorous and revelatory commentary on how these holy books are intrinsically connected.

    Reynolds demonstrates how Jewish and Christian characters, imagery, and literary devices feature prominently in the Qur'ān, including stories of angels bowing before Adam and of Jesus speaking as an infant. This important contribution to religious studies features a full translation of the Qur'ān along with excerpts from the Jewish and Christian texts. It offers a clear analysis of the debates within the communities of religious scholars concerning the relationship of these scriptures, providing a new lens through which to view the powerful links that bond these three major religions.

  • Fragile Empire - How Russia Fell in and out of Love with Vladimir Putin

    A lively, inside account of Putin's years of rule and the impending crisis that threatens his tsar-like regime

    From Kaliningrad on the Baltic to the Russian Far East, journalist Ben Judah has travelled throughout Russia and the former Soviet republics, conducting extensive interviews with President Vladimir Putin's friends, foes, and colleagues, government officials, business tycoons, mobsters, and ordinary Russian citizens. Fragile Empire is the fruit of Judah's thorough research: a probing assessment of Putin's rise to power and what it has meant for Russia and her people. Despite a propaganda program intent on maintaining the cliche of stability, Putin's regime was suddenly confronted in December 2011 by a highly public protest movement that told a different side of the story. Judah argues that Putinism has brought economic growth to Russia but also weaker institutions, and this contradiction leads to instability. The author explores both Putin's successes and his failed promises, taking into account the impact of a new middle class and a new generation, the Internet, social activism, and globalization on the president's impending leadership crisis. Can Russia avoid the crisis of Putinism? Judah offers original and up-to-the-minute answers.

  • Beyond Craft - Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection

    Since the 1960s, Leatrice and Melvin Eagle have acquired decorative arts of the highest quality, beginning with contemporary ceramics and then expanding to works in other mediums produced from the 1940s to the present. Although primarily American in scope, their collection also encompasses significant pieces by acclaimed international artists. This book presents, for the first time, key highlights from the Eagle collection, which was acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in 2010. At the core of the collection are stunning examples of ceramics by groundbreaking California-based artists, such as Robert Arneson, Ralph Bacerra, Viola Frey, David Gilhooly, Ron Nagle, Ken Price, Adrian Saxe, and Peter Voulkos. Also included is furniture by Wendell Castle and Sam Maloof; textile and fiber art by Olga de Amaral, John Garrett, John McQueen, and Cynthia Schira; and jewelry and metalwork by William Harper, Albert Paley, Earl Pardon, and Joyce J. Scott. This catalogue features works by about 40 key artists and an illustrated checklist of about 170 objects in the collection.

  • Caribbean - Art at the Crossroads of the World

    The first book to explore the entire range of modern and contemporary art of the Caribbean

    Unprecedented in scope, this beautiful book offers an authoritative examination of the modern history of the Caribbean through its artistic culture. Featuring 500 color illustrations of artworks from the late 18th through the 21st century, the book explores modern and contemporary art, ranging from the Haitian revolution to the present.

    Acknowledging both the individuality of each island, the richness of the coastal regions, and the reach of the Diaspora, Caribbean looks at the vital visual and cultural links that exist among these diverse constituencies. The authors examine how the Caribbean has been imagined and pictured, and the role of art in the development of national identity. Essays by leading scholars cover such topics as the interconnections between Caribbean artistic production to its colonial contexts; between various generations of artists; and between the so-called high and low arts and religion, music, and carnival celebrations. Primary source documents crucial to understanding the region provide an important complement.

    Edited by Deborah Cullen and Elvis Fuentes, and featuring essays by Katherine Manthorne, Mari Carmen Ramirez, Lowery Stokes Sims, and Edward J. Sullivan, among many others, this book will serve as the definitive volume on Caribbean visual culture for many decades to come.

  • Timothy H. O′Sullivan - The King Survey Photographs

    Clarence King's Survey, undertaken between 1867 and 1872, covered a vast swath of terrain, from the border of California eastward to the edge of the Great Plains. It was the first survey to include a full-time photographer--Timothy O'Sullivan--who produced about 450 finished photographs in large-format and smaller-format stereographs. O'Sullivan's images convey a distinct individual quality of perception, at once direct and laconic, as well as a perfect union of objective fact and personal interpretation. As such, O'Sullivan remains the most admired, studied, and debated photographer who worked on the great western surveys of the 19th century.

    This handsome and enlightening book aims to enrich and enlarge our understanding of O'Sullivan's pivotal body of western photographs by emphasizing the idea of context. This ambition encompasses several frames of reference: O'Sullivan's best-known images in relation to his larger body of survey work; the function his photographs served in relation to the survey's overall goals and methodologies; and the King Survey itself as a logical part of a complex and prolonged expeditionary endeavor. The volume also includes an essential catalogue raisonne of O'Sullivan's King Survey work.

  • Contemporary British Studio Ceramics

    In Britain today the output of excellent ceramics seems more eclectic than elsewhere. This stylish and wide-ranging survey comprises examples of clay art by one hundred major artists, covering the period from the late 1980s through 2009. Drawn from the Diane and Marc Grainer Collection, it includes works by Allison Britton, Edmund de Waal, Kate Malone, Grayson Perry, Julian Stair, Steve Dixon, and Nick Arroyave-Portela, among others. The selection balances functional objects and sculpture; hand-built, thrown, and moulded techniques; varieties of scale and colour; and cerebral and emotional content. All the ceramics here are rooted in the materiality of clay. The properties of the raw material, from its soft, malleable texture to the alchemy of slips and glazes, are at the core of the artists passion. And, as the text reveals, the younger generation is moving into new directions of art practice. Published in conjunction with the inaugural exhibition at the Mint Museum Uptown, Charlotte, NC.

  • Barley, Gold, or Fiat - Towards a Pure Theory of Money

    Using simple but rigorously defined mathematical models, Thomas Quint and Martin Shubik explore monetary control in a simple exchange economy. Examining how money enters, circulates, and exits an economy, they consider the nature of trading systems and the role of government authority in the exchange of consumer goods for storable money; exchanges made with durable currency, such as gold; fiat currency, which is flexible but has no consumption value; conditions under which borrowers can declare bankruptcy; and the distinctions between individuals who lend their own money, and financiers, who lend others'.

  • Cartooning - Philosophy and Practice

    From the editor of Yale's Anthology of Graphic Fiction, Cartoons, and True Stories, a smart and charming guide to the art of cartooning

    The best cartooning is efficient visual storytelling--it is as much a matter of writing as it is of drawing. In this book, noted cartoonist and illustrator Ivan Brunetti presents fifteen distinct lessons on the art of cartooning, guiding his readers through wittily written passages on cartooning terminology, techniques, tools, and theory. Supplemented by Brunetti's own illustrations, prepared specially for this book, these lessons move the reader from spontaneous drawings to single-panel strips and complicated multipage stories.

    Through simple, creative exercises and assignments, Brunetti offers an unintimidating approach to a complex art form. He looks at the rhythms of storytelling, the challenges of character design, and the formal elements of comics while composing pages in his own iconic style and experimenting with a variety of tools, media, and approaches. By following the author's sophisticated and engaging perspective on the art of cartooning, aspiring cartoonists of all ages will hone their craft, create their personal style, and discover their own visual language.

  • Slow Lightning - Yale Series of Younger Poets

    Eduardo C. Corral is the 2011 recipient of the Yale Series of Younger Poets award, joining such distinguished previous winners as Adrienne Rich, W. S. Merwin, and John Ashbery. Corral is the first Latino poet to win the competition.

    Seamlessly braiding English and Spanish, Corral's poems hurtle across literary and linguistic borders toward a lyricism that slows down experience. He employs a range of forms and phrasing, bringing the vivid particulars of his experiences as a Chicano and gay man to the page. Although Corral's topics are decidedly sobering, contest judge Carl Phillips observes, "one of the more surprising possibilities offered in these poems is joy."

    From "Self-Portrait with Tumbling and Lasso"

    I'm a cowboy

    riding bareback

    My soul is

    whirling

    above my head like a lasso.

    My right hand

    a pistol. My left

    automatic. I'm knocking

    on every door.

    I'm coming on strong . . .

  • That Which Is - Tattvartha Sutra

    This classic Jain manual for understanding the true nature of reality is now published for the first time in an English translation outside of India. Regarded by the Jains as the earliest, most authoritative and comprehensive summary of their religion, this book is sponsored by the Institute of Jainology.

  • Sultans of Deccan India, 1500 1700 - Opulence and Fantasy

    A survey of the stunningly beautiful visual and decorative arts created by India's Deccan kingdoms

    In the 16th and 17th centuries, the Deccan plateau of south-central India was home to a series of important, highly cultured Muslim kingdoms and was a nexus of international trade. Invigorated by cultural connections to Iran, Turkey, East Africa, and Europe, Deccani art is celebrated for its unmistakable, otherworldly character: in painting, a poetic lyricism; in architecture, a somber grandeur; and in the decorative arts, lively creations in inlaid metalwork and dyed textiles. This beautifully illustrated catalogue, which includes extraordinary new site photographs and lush landscape images, along with discussions of 200 of the finest Deccani works, creates the most comprehensive examination to date of this fascinating and remote world. The text not only discusses paintings, drawings, textiles, arms, manuscripts, and other decorative arts from this rich culture, but also explores the history, architecture, literature, and music of the period. Essays by prominent international authors, supplemented by informative maps, illustrated appendices, and select primary sources, make this pioneering book a key resource on the subject.

  • Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus

    An intriguing new look at the historical significance of Rembrandt's representations of Christ

    With the creation of the dramatic Supper at Emmaus (Louvre) and a series of intimate oil sketches of Christ on oak panels, Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) overturned the entire history of Christian art. Traditionally, when depicting Christ, artists had relied on rigidly copied prototypes and icons. Among Rembrandt's innovations was his use of a Jewish model to portray a Christ imbued with empathy, gentleness, grace, and faithfulness to nature.

    Lavishly illustrated, this captivating and important book presents the seven known panels, along with more than 60 paintings, drawings, and prints by Rembrandt and his pupils. Essays by expert contributors offer insights into the production of the panels and their relationship to other works in Rembrandt's oeuvre; how he changed the meaning and status of the canonical image of Christ in northern European art; and much more. Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus is a marvelously intriguing study of how one of the greatest painters of the Dutch Golden Age revolutionized an aspect of art history dating to antiquity.

  • Toxic Bodies

    In 1941 the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of diethylstilbestrol (DES), the first synthetic chemical to be marketed as an estrogen and one of the first to be identified as a hormone disruptor--a chemical that mimics hormones. Although researchers knew that DES caused cancer and disrupted sexual development, doctors prescribed it for millions of women, initially for menopause and then for miscarriage, while farmers gave cattle the hormone to promote rapid weight gain. Its residues, and those of other chemicals, in the American food supply are changing the internal ecosystems of human, livestock, and wildlife bodies in increasingly troubling ways.

    In this gripping exploration, Nancy Langston shows how these chemicals have penetrated into every aspect of our bodies and ecosystems, yet the U.S. government has largely failed to regulate them and has skillfully manipulated scientific uncertainty to delay regulation. Personally affected by endocrine disruptors, Langston argues that the FDA needs to institute proper regulation of these commonly produced synthetic chemicals.

  • Rembrandt′s Themes - Life into Art

    Rembrandt van Rjin (1606-1669) was among the few celebrated old masters who enjoyed considerable freedom in his choice of subject matter. Living and working in the Protestant Netherlands, he painted largely for private patrons and the open market, selecting his own subjects in the hope of finding buyers. Although he depicted biblical, historical, and mythological themes in emulation of the great artists of the past, his subjects often focus on fundamental human experiences and emotions that transcend their literary sources. Even when working within the confines of specific commissions, Rembrandt managed to imbue his paintings with deeper, personal meanings. These works reveal the artist's profound humanity and at times reflect the circumstances of his life. This illuminating study explores some of the central themes of Rembrandt's paintings, drawings, and etchings: grand - love, sin, repentance and forgiveness, adultery, fatherhood, and the conflict between the generations - as well as mundane and idiosyncratic. It demonstrates how Rembrandt's subjects can offer new revelations about this complex artist.

  • Religious Poverty, Visual Riches - Art in the Dominican Churches of Central Italy in the Thirteenth and Fouteenth Centuries

    The Dominican friars of late-medieval Italy were committed to a life of poverty, yet their churches contained many visual riches, as this groundbreaking study reveals. Works by supreme practitioners--Cimabue, Duccio, Giotto, and Simone Martini--are examined here in a wider Dominican context. The contents of major foundations--Siena, Pisa, Perugia, and Santa Maria Novella in Florence--are studied alongside less well-known centers. For the first time, these frescoes and panel paintings are brought together with illuminated choir books, carved crucifixes, goldsmith's work, tombs, and stained glass. At the heart of the book is the Dominicans' evolving relationship with the laity, expressed at first by the partitioning of their churches, and subsequently by the sharing of space, and the production and use of art. Joanna Cannon's magisterial study is informed by extensive new research, using chronicles, legislation, liturgy, sermons, and other sources to explore the place of art in the lives of the friars and the urban laity of Central Italy.


  • Knowledge in the Making - Academic Freedom and Free Speech in America′s Schools and Universities

    A compelling must-read for parents, administrators, faculty, and anyone with an interest in what happens when academics and politics intersect

    How free are students and teachers to express unpopular ideas in public schools and universities? Not free enough, Joan DelFattore suggests. Wading without hesitation into some of the most contentious issues of our times, she investigates battles over a wide range of topics that have fractured school and university communities--homosexuality-themed children's books, research on race-based intelligence, the teaching of evolution, the regulation of hate speech, and more--and with her usual evenhanded approach offers insights supported by theory and by practical expertise.

    Two key questions arise: What ideas should schools and universities teach? And what rights do teachers and students have to disagree with those ideas? The answers are not the same for K-12 schools as they are for public universities. But far from drawing a bright line between them, DelFattore suggests that we must consider public education as a whole to determine how--and how successfully--it deals with conflicting views.

    When expert opinion clashes with popular belief, which should prevail? How much independence should K-12 teachers have? How do we foster the cutting-edge research that makes America a world leader in higher education? What are the free-speech rights of students? This uniquely accessible and balanced discussion deserves the full attention of everyone concerned with academic goals and agendas in our schools.

  • Egypt on the Brink - From Nasser to the Muslim Brotherhood Updated Edition

    In February 2011, following an extraordinary eighteen days of continual protest by the Egyptian people, President Mubarak agreed to resign, bringing thirty years of a repressive and stagnant regime to an end. In June 2012, a new president was elected: Mohamed Morsi, a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, which for half a century had been banned from operating publicly in the country. But, after only a year in office, Morsi was forced out by popular protests and the military establishment. In this revised and updated edition of his acclaimed book, Tarek Osman sets the current battle for the Egyptian state in the wider context of the country's recent history. Famous until the 1950s for its religious pluralism and extraordinary cultural heritage, Egypt has become an increasingly unhappy and divided land, home to a largely undereducated and underemployed population, more than half of whom are aged under thirty. Osman examines the crucial roles of Arab nationalism, the Islamic movement, Egyptians Christians and liberal capitalism in the country's recent past and present, and asks: where does Egypt's future lie now?

  • Flowers and Herbs of Early America

    A detailed look at early American flowers and herbs, with expert advice on creating a garden with historically accurate plants

    Hounds-tongue. Ragged robin. Costmary. Pennyroyal. All-heal. These plants, whose very names conjure up a bygone world, were among the great variety of flowers and herbs grown in America's colonial and early Federal gardens. In this sumptuously illustrated book, a leading historic plant expert brings this botanical heritage back to life.

    Drawing on years of archival research and field trials in Colonial Williamsburg's gardens in Williamsburg, Virginia, Lawrence Griffith documents fifty-six species of flowers and herbs and provides details on how they were cultivated and used. For each plant, an elegant period hand-colored engraving, watercolor, or woodcut is presented along with glorious new photographs by Barbara Temple Lombardi.

    This book is a dazzling treat for armchair gardeners and for those who have visited and admired the famous gardens of Colonial Williamsburg. It is also an invaluable companion for twenty-first-century gardeners who will appreciate the specific advice of a master gardener on how to plan, choose appropriate species for, and maintain a beautiful, historic flower and herb garden.

    The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is a not-for-profit educational institution that operates the world's largest living history museum.

  • An Eames Anthology - Articles, Film Scripts, Interviews, Letters, Notes, and Speeches

    An inspiring collection of the writings of two of the 20th century's most brilliant and influential designers

    An Eames Anthology collects for the first time the writings of the esteemed American architects and designers Charles and Ray Eames, illuminating their marriage and professional partnership of fifty years. More than 120 primary-source documents and 200 illustrations highlight iconic projects such as the Case Study Houses and the molded plywood chair, as well as their work for major corporations as both designers (Herman Miller, Vitra) and consultants (IBM, Polaroid). Previously unpublished materials appear alongside published writings by and about the Eameses and their work, lending new insight into their creative process. Correspondence with such luminaries as Richard Neutra and Eero Saarinen provides a personal glimpse into the advance of modernity in mid-century America.

  • Paris 1650-1900 - Decorative Arts in the Rijksmuseum

    From 1650 to 1900 Paris was the undisputed center of fashion and taste in Europe. Home to a unique concentration of artists, designers, patrons, critics, and a keen buying public, Paris was the city where trends were made and where novel types of objects, devised for new ways of life, were invented. This book traces the wonderful story of Parisian decorative arts from the reign of Louis XIV to the triumph of art nouveau, through a selection of 150 breathtaking, and often little-known, masterpieces from the collection of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. It features an exhilarating mixture of furniture, gilt bronze, tapestries, silver, watches, snuff-boxes, jewellery, Sevres porcelain, and other ceramics, as well as some design drawings and engravings. Specially taken photographs reveal the daring design and beautiful execution of the work of some of the greatest artists and craftsmen of their time. Reinier Baarsen discusses the history and significance of each object, presenting the findings of much new research.

  • 100 Shoes - The Costume Institute / The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    An exclusive look at one hundred fabulous shoes from the renowned Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    A hundred pairs of shoes, from the 16th to the 21st century, paint a vivid picture of how shoe styles have changed--sometimes radically--over the years. They also reveal how some trends have reappeared throughout the ages. For instance, platform shoes were worn by fashionable Venetian women from the 15th to the 17th century and by Manchu Chinese women in the 1800s. In the late 1930s, Salvatore Ferragamo introduced a modern version of the platform shoe, and updated versions appeared in the 1970s and 1990s.

    Beautifully designed and produced, this brilliant follow-up to the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's 100 Dresses presents examples of fashionable footwear in a range of styles, from flats to stilettos and everything in between. Among them are shoes designed by Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Roger Vivier, and Vivienne Westwood. Images of the shoes are accompanied by informative text and enhanced by works of art, contemporary photos, and portraits of designers. Sure to spark the imaginations of anyone interested in fashion and design, 100 Shoes details how women have used these essential fashion accessories to elevate their style, stature, and status throughout the centuries. An introduction by fashion-forward actress Sarah Jessica Parker adds to the accessibility and appeal of this delightful volume.

  • My Faraway One - Selected Letters of Georgia O′Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz - 1915-1933 V1

    The first extensive publication from the extraordinary archive of private correspondence between two of this country's most famous artists

    There are few couples in the history of 20th-century American art and culture more prominent than Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) and Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946). Between 1915, when they first began to write to each other, and 1946, when Stieglitz died, O'Keeffe and Stieglitz exchanged over 5,000 letters (more than 25,000 pages) that describe their daily lives in profoundly rich detail. This long-awaited volume features some 650 letters, carefully selected and annotated by leading photography scholar Sarah Greenough.

    In O'Keeffe's sparse and vibrant style and Stieglitz's fervent and lyrical manner, the letters describe how they met and fell in love in the 1910s; how they carved out a life together in the 1920s; how their relationship nearly collapsed during the early years of the Depression; and how it was reconstructed in the late 1930s and early 1940s. At the same time, the correspondence reveals the creative evolution of their art and ideas; their friendships with many of the most influential figures in early American modernism (Charles Demuth, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, John Marin, and Paul Strand, to name a few); and their relationships and conversations with an exceptionally wide range of key figures in American and European art and culture (including Duncan Phillips, Diego Rivera, D. H. Lawrence, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Marcel Duchamp). Furthermore, their often poignant prose reveals insights into the impact of larger cultural forces--World Wars I and II; the booming economy of the 1920s; and the Depression of the 1930s--on two articulate, creative individuals.

  • Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security

    "If you've got nothing to hide," many people say, "you shouldn't worry about government surveillance." Others argue that we must sacrifice privacy for security. But as Daniel J. Solove argues in this important book, these arguments and many others are flawed. They are based on mistaken views about what it means to protect privacy and the costs and benefits of doing so. The debate between privacy and security has been framed incorrectly as a zero-sum game in which we are forced to choose between one value and the other. Why can't we have both?

    In this concise and accessible book, Solove exposes the fallacies of many pro-security arguments that have skewed law and policy to favor security at the expense of privacy. Protecting privacy isn't fatal to security measures; it merely involves adequate oversight and regulation. Solove traces the history of the privacy-security debate from the Revolution to the present day. He explains how the law protects privacy and examines concerns with new technologies. He then points out the failings of our current system and offers specific remedies. Nothing to Hide makes a powerful and compelling case for reaching a better balance between privacy and security and reveals why doing so is essential to protect our freedom and democracy.

  • Joe Louis - Hard Times Man

    The definitive biography of one of the twentieth century's greatest sports figures

    Joe Louis defended his heavyweight boxing title an astonishing twenty-five times and reigned as world champion for more than eleven years. He got more column inches of newspaper coverage in the 1930s than FDR did. His racially and politically charged defeat of Max Schmeling in 1938 made Louis a national hero. But as important as his record is what he meant to African-Americans: at a time when the boxing ring was the only venue where black and white could meet on equal terms, Louis embodied all their hopes for dignity and equality.

    Through meticulous research and first-hand interviews, acclaimed historian and biographer Randy Roberts presents Louis, and his impact on sport and country, in a way never before accomplished. Roberts reveals an athlete who carefully managed his public image, and whose relationships with both the black and white communities--including his relationships with mobsters--were far more complex than the simplistic accounts of heroism and victimization that have dominated previous biographies.

    Richly researched and utterly captivating, this extraordinary biography presents the full range of Joe Louis's power in and out of the boxing ring.

  • Proust in Love

    The acclaimed Proust biographer William Carter portrays Proust's amorous adventures and misadventures from adolescence through his adult years, supplying where appropriate Proust's own sensitive, intelligent, and often disillusioned observations about love and sexuality. Proust is revealed as a man agonizingly caught between the constant fear of public exposure as a homosexual and the need to find and express love. In telling the story of Proust in love, Carter also shows how the author's experiences became major themes in his novel In Search of Lost Time. Carter discusses Proust's adolescent sexual experiences, his disastrous brothel visit to cure homosexual inclinations, and his first great loves. He also addresses the duel Proust fought with the journalist Jean Lorrain after he alluded to Proust's homosexuality in print, his flirtations with respectable women and high-class prostitutes, and his affairs with young men of the servant class. With new revelations about Proust's love life and a gallery of photographs, the book provides an unprecedented glimpse of Proust's gay Paris.

  • Genocide Before the Holocaust

    This innovative and ambitious work is a systematic examination of the many instances of genocide that took place in the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century centuries that were precursors to the Holocaust.

    There is an appalling symmetry to the many instances of genocide that the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century world witnessed. In the wake of the break-up of the old Hapsburg, Ottoman and Romanov empires, minority populations throughout those lands were persecuted, expelled and eliminated. The reason for the deplorable decimations of communities - Jews in Imperial Russia and Ukraine, Ottoman Assyrians, Armenians and Muslims from the Caucasus and Balkans - was, Cathie Carmichael contends, located in the very roots of the new nation states arising from the imperial rubble. The question of who should be included in the nation, and which groups were now to be deemed 'suspect' or 'alien', was one that preoccupied and divided Europe long before the Holocaust.

    Examining all the major eliminations of communities in Europe up until 1941, Carmichael shows how hotbeds of nationalism, racism and developmentalism resulted in devastating manifestations of genocidal ideology. Dramatic, perceptive and poignant, this is the story of disappearing civilizations - precursors to one of humanity's worst atrocities, and part of the legacy of genocide in the modern world.

  • Art and Music in Venice - From the Renaissance to Baroque

    Artistic and musical creativity thrived in the Venetian Republic between the early 16th century and the close of the 18th century. The city-state was known for its superb operas and splendid balls, and the acoustics of the architecture led to complex polyphony in musical composition. Accordingly, notable composers, including Antonio Vivaldi and Adrian Willaert, developed styles that were distinct from those of other Italian cultures. The Venetian music scene, in turn, influenced visual artists, inspiring paintings by artists such as Jacopo Bassano, Canaletto, Francesco Guardi, Pietro Longhi, Bernardo Strozzi, Giambattista and Domenico Tiepolo, Tintoretto, and Titian. Together, art and music served larger aims, whether social, ceremonial, or even political. Lavishly illustrated, Art and Music in Venice brings Venice's golden age to life through stunning images of paintings, drawings, prints, manuscripts, textbooks, illuminated choir books, musical scores and instruments, and period costumes. New scholarship into these objects by a team of distinguished experts gives a fresh perspective on the cultural life and creative output of the era.

  • Violence and Virtue - Artemisia Gentileschi′s "Judith Slaying Holofernes"

    Artemisia Gentileschi's uniquely powerful painting Judith Slaying Holofernes is a quintessential example of early Baroque art. In addition, this work, more than any other picture in her oeuvre, has come to define Gentileschi as an early modern woman and a superb Baroque painter, the first woman accepted into the renowned Accademia delle Arti del Disegno in Florence.

    In Violence and Virtue, Eve Straussman-Pflanzer explores the circumstances surrounding the creation of this extraordinary painting in Florence around 1620, and she examines the meanings conveyed by the image itself. Among other topics of investigation, the author addresses the role of women artists and patrons in the Florentine court of the early 17th century. She also considers the depiction of and fascination with violence during the Baroque era. A comparative analysis between Gentileschi's masterpiece and other paintings by artists such as Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, Sandro Botticelli, Cristofano Allori, and Felice Ficherelli, among others, testifies to the importance of Gentileschi's portrayal of the biblical heroine Judith.

  • Traditional Buildings of Cumbria

    Many people who live in and visit the Lake District are charmed by the traditional buildings that enhance the landscape. This book introduces the traditional houses, barns, watermills, and chapels of the Lake District and the surrounding hills and valleys that make up the county of Cumbria. With the aid of hundreds of photographs, drawings, and diagrams, the author explains how the building types have developed over the centuries and how the indigenous building materials of stone, clay, brick, and slate have been used to create works of vernacular architecture that seem to grow out of the surrounding landscape.

  • Renoir - Impressionism and Full-Length Painting

    Magnificent full-length impressionist paintings by Renoir capture the glamorous spirit and refined milieu of Belle Epoque Paris

    Throughout his long working life, Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) produced large-format portraits and subject pictures. From the mid-1870s to the mid-1880s--the decade of Impressionism--his vertical, grand-scale canvases were among the artist's most daring and ambitious presentations of contemporary life and fashion. Today they rank among the masterpieces of Impressionism. This stunning book offers fresh insights into Renoir's complex ambitions as a young artist, when he submitted works to both the avant-garde impressionist exhibitions and the official Salon. While painting in the new impressionist style, Renoir remained committed to the full-length format, which was eschewed by most of his fellow impressionists as too traditional. This format afforded Renoir the opportunity to devote himself to the heroic painting of everyday life, and also to linger on the finest details of his figures' fashionable costumes and accessories. Ten iconic canvases display the rich variety of this artist's painterly technique. They reveal the sheer virtuosity of his brushwork in creating silk, lace, mink, and taffeta for shimmering ball gowns, sumptuous furs, chic Parisian day dresses, and glamorous theatrical costumes. These paintings capture the faces and fashions of Renoir's Paris.

    Extensively illustrated, the book draws upon contemporary criticism, literature, and archival documents to explore the motivation behind Renoir's full-length figure paintings, and technical studies of the canvases shed new light on the artist's working methods.

  • The City of Tomorrow: Sensors, Networks, Hackers, and the Future of Urban Life

    An internationally renowned architect, urban planner, and scholar describes the major technological forces driving the future of cities

    Since cities emerged ten thousand years ago, they have become one of the most impressive artifacts of humanity. But their evolution has been anything but linear--cities have gone through moments of radical change, turning points that redefine their very essence. In this book, a renowned architect and urban planner who studies the intersection of cities and technology argues that we are in such a moment.

    The authors explain some of the forces behind urban change and offer new visions of the many possibilities for tomorrow's city. Pervasive digital systems that layer our cities are transforming urban life. The authors provide a front-row seat to this change. Their work at the MIT Senseable City Laboratory allows experimentation and implementation of a variety of urban initiatives and concepts, from assistive condition-monitoring bicycles to trash with embedded tracking sensors, from mobility to energy, from participation to production. They call for a new approach to envisioning cities: futurecraft, a symbiotic development of urban ideas by designers and the public. With such participation, we can collectively imagine, examine, choose, and shape the most desirable future of our cities.

  • Wetware - A Computer in Every Living Cell

    How does a single-cell creature, such as an amoeba, lead such a sophisticated life? How does it hunt living prey, respond to lights, sounds, and smells, and display complex sequences of movements without the benefit of a nervous system? This book offers a startling and original answer. In clear, jargon-free language, Dennis Bray taps the findings of the new discipline of systems biology to show that the internal chemistry of living cells is a form of computation. Cells are built out of molecular circuits that perform logical operations, as electronic devices do, but with unique properties. Bray argues that the computational juice of cells provides the basis of all the distinctive properties of living systems: it allows organisms to embody in their internal structure an image of the world, and this accounts for their adaptability, responsiveness, and intelligence. Wetware, like its author, is refreshingly heterodox. Bray offers perceptive critiques of robotics and complexity theory, for example, as well as many entertaining and telling anecdotes. For the general reader, the practising scientist, and all others with an interest in the nature of life, the book is an exciting portal to some of biologys latest discoveries and ideas.

  • The Snowy Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats

    In 1962, Ezra Jack Keats' picture book 'The Snowy Day' introduced readers to young Peter, the first African American protagonist in a full-colour children's book, who traipsed alone through the snowy, wondrous sidewalks of New York City. The book was a runaway success, capturing the Caldecott Medal and selling more than two million copies. In 'The Snowy Day' and subsequent books, Keats' awareness of the city, its daily hum and the role of its children are deeply felt and delicately rendered in words and bright collages and paintings. He made a prominent place for characters and places that had not been represented in children's books, saying about Peter, 'My book would have him there simply because he should have been there all along'. Coinciding with the 50th anniversary of 'The Snowy Day', the current publication features more than 75 illustrations alongside essays by Claudia Nahson and Maurice Berger, who discuss Keats' Jewish background, his advocacy of civil rights, his inventive art, and his wide-ranging influence.

  • Serpent and the Lamb - Cranach, Luther, and the Making of the Reformation

    This compelling book retells and revises the story of the German Renaissance and Reformation through the lives of two controversial men of the sixteenth century: the Saxon court painter Lucas Cranach (the Serpent) and the Wittenberg monk-turned-reformer Martin Luther (the Lamb). Contemporaries and friends (each was godfather to the other's children), Cranach and Luther were very different Germans, yet their collaborative successes merged art and religion into a revolutionary force that became the Protestant Reformation. Steven Ozment, an internationally recognized historian of the Reformation era, reprises the lives and works of Cranach (1472-1553) and Luther (1483-1546) in this generously illustrated book. He contends that Cranach's new art and Luther's oratory released a barrage of criticism upon the Vatican, the force of which secured a new freedom of faith and pluralism of religion in the Western world. Between Luther's pulpit praise of the sex drive within the divine estate of marriage and Cranach's parade of strong, lithe women, a new romantic, familial consciousness was born. The -Cranach woman- and the -Lutheran household---both products of the merged Renaissance and Reformation worlds--evoked a new organization of society and foretold a new direction for Germany.

  • Eyes of the Ancestors - The Arts of Island Southeast Asia at the Dallas Museums of Art

    "Eyes of the Ancestors" takes an in-depth look at the Dallas Museum of Art s world-renowned collection of artworks from Island Southeast Asia. Beautiful photography and essays by distinguished international scholars unlock the magic of the island cultures of Indonesia, Sarawak, and East Timor. Leadinganthropologist Reimar Schefold introduces these texts, which investigate various indigenous art forms from a fresh art-historical perspective. They describe the contexts, purposes, and aesthetic influences of a range of objects, from intricately woven sacred and ceremonial textiles to carved ancestor figures. Also featured are gold and metalwork designs as well as weaponry and jewelry, most dating back more than a hundred years. A 19th-century mouth mask in the collection, from the Leti Islands, is one of onlyour known to be in existence. Carved in the shape of a bird s head, this wooden mask was used in ritual dances. Other spectacular examples from the collection likewise reflect the beliefs and practices of these island peoples."

  • A Plague of Informers - Conspiracy and Political Trust in William III′s England

    Stories of plots, sham plots, and the citizen-informers who discovered them are at the center of Rachel Weil's compelling study of the turbulent decade following the Revolution of 1688. Most studies of the Glorious Revolution focus on its causes or long-term effects, but Weil instead zeroes in on the early years when the survival of the new regime was in doubt. By encouraging informers, imposing loyalty oaths, suspending habeas corpus, and delaying the long-promised reform of treason trial procedure, the Williamite regime protected itself from enemies and cemented its bonds with supporters, but also put its own credibility at risk.

  • Picturing Faith - Photography and the Great Depression

    In the midst of the Great Depression, the American government initiated one of the most ambitious national photographic projects ever undertaken. Such photographers as Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, and Gordon Parks--all then virtually unknown--were commissioned to chronicle in pictures the economic struggle and social dislocation of the Depression era. They explored every facet of rural life in an effort to document the troubles, as well as the spirit, of the nation.

    Fanning out across the country, these photographers captured a nation alive with religious faith--from Dust Bowl migrants singing hymns to orthodox Jews praying in rural Connecticut. In Picturing Faith, the preeminent historian of religion Colleen McDannell recounts the history of this extraordinary project, telling the stories of the men and women who participated in it and exploring these little-known images of America.

    Lavishly illustrated, Picturing Faith teases out the various and conflicting ways that these photographers portrayed American religion and enhances our understanding of how religion was practiced during this critical period of American history.

  • The Theory that would not Die - How Bayes′ Rule Cracked the Enigma Code, Hunted Down Russian Submarines and Emerged Triumphant from

    A vivid account of the generations-long dispute over one of the greatest breakthroughs in the history of applied mathematics and statistics

    Bayes' rule appears to be a straightforward, one-line theorem: by updating our initial beliefs with objective new information, we get a new and improved belief. To its adherents, it is an elegant statement about learning from experience. To its opponents, it is subjectivity run amok.

    In the first-ever account of Bayes' rule for general readers, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores this controversial theorem and the human obsessions surrounding it. She traces its discovery by an amateur mathematician in the 1740s through its development into roughly its modern form by French scientist Pierre Simon Laplace. She reveals why respected statisticians rendered it professionally taboo for 150 years--at the same time that practitioners relied on it to solve crises involving great uncertainty and scanty information (Alan Turing's role in breaking Germany's Enigma code during World War II), and explains how the advent of off-the-shelf computer technology in the 1980s proved to be a game-changer. Today, Bayes' rule is used everywhere from DNA de-coding to Homeland Security.

    Drawing on primary source material and interviews with statisticians and other scientists, The Theory That Would Not Die is the riveting account of how a seemingly simple theorem ignited one of the greatest controversies of all time.

  • Dan Graham - The Roof Garden Commission

    The artist Dan Graham (b. 1942) has a wide-ranging practice that encompasses writing, performance art, installation, video, photography, and architecture. Throughout his career, Graham has examined the symbiosis between architectural environments and their inhabitants, particularly in his pavilions made of glass and mirrors.

    His new installation, created for the roof garden of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, addresses current issues about suburban psychology and political surveillance. Graham's work combines landscaping, hedges, and two-way mirrors to create a provocative, immersive experience for viewers. This creatively designed publication includes an insightful interview between the artist and Sheena Wagstaff and focuses not only on Graham's latest commission but also on his previous landscape-oriented installations, providing a focused, fascinating study of one of today's leading contemporary artists.

  • John Keats - A New Life

    An entirely new portrait of Keats, rich with insights into the torments of his life and the imaginative sources of his works

    This landmark biography of celebrated Romantic poet John Keats explodes entrenched conceptions of him as a delicate, overly sensitive, tragic figure. Instead, Nicholas Roe reveals the real flesh-and-blood poet: a passionate man driven by ambition but prey to doubt, suspicion, and jealousy; sure of his vocation while bitterly resentful of the obstacles that blighted his career; devoured by sexual desire and frustration; and in thrall to alcohol and opium. Through unparalleled original research, Roe arrives at a fascinating reassessment of Keats's entire life, from his early years at Keats's Livery Stables through his harrowing battle with tuberculosis and death at age 25. Zeroing in on crucial turning points, Roe finds in the locations of Keats's poems new keys to the nature of his imaginative quest.

    Roe is the first biographer to provide a full and fresh account of Keats's childhood in the City of London and how it shaped the would-be poet. The mysterious early death of Keats's father, his mother's too-swift remarriage, living in the shadow of the notorious madhouse Bedlam--all these affected Keats far more than has been previously understood. The author also sheds light on Keats's doomed passion for Fanny Brawne, his circle of brilliant friends, hitherto unknown City relatives, and much more. Filled with revelations and daring to ask new questions, this book now stands as the definitive volume on one of the most beloved poets of the English language.

  • American Georgics - Writings on Farming, Culture and the Land

    A rich and evocative collection of agrarian writing from the past two centuries, reflecting how shifting views on agriculture have shaped American society, from the first European settlers to the modern organic movement.

    From Thomas Jefferson's Monticello to Michelle Obama's White House organic garden, the image of America as a nation of farmers has persisted from the beginnings of the American experiment. In this rich and evocative collection of agrarian writing from the past two centuries, writers from Hector St. Jean de Crevecoeur to Wendell Berry reveal not only the great reach and durability of the American agrarian ideal, but also the ways in which society has contested and confronted its relationship to agriculture over the course of generations.

    Drawing inspiration from Virgil's agrarian epic poem, Georgics, this collection presents a complex historical portrait of the American character through its relationship to the land. From the first European settlers eager to cultivate new soil, to the Transcendentalist, utopian, and religious thinkers of the nineteenth century, American society has drawn upon the vision of a pure rural life for inspiration. Back-to-the-land movements have surged and retreated in the past centuries yet provided the agrarian roots for the environmental movement of the past forty years. Interpretative essays and a sprinkling of illustrations accompany excerpts from each of these periods of American agrarian thought, providing a framework for understanding the sweeping changes that have confronted the nation's landscape.

  • Painted Glories - The Brancacci Chapel in Renaissance Florence

    In 1440, on the feast of Saints Peter and Paul, Florence unexpectedly defeated Milanese forces near the town of Anghiari in eastern Tuscany. Nicholas Eckstein reveals the impact of this celebrated victory on Florentine public life and how it could have triggered the custodians of the Brancacci Chapel, the Carmelite friars, to seek the completion of the frescoes by Masolino (c. 1383-c. 1436) and Masaccio (1401-c. 1428). Today, tens of thousands of people visit the Brancacci Chapel annually to gaze at the brilliant frescoes of Saint Peter's life. Universally recognized as a canonical masterpiece of the Florentine Renaissance, these glowing murals span the interior in long panels. The first serious examination to position the frescoes at the heart of Tuscan society and culture, Painted Glories teems with fascinating characters and intrigue. In swiftly paced prose, Eckstein explores the Chapel's history, medieval culture, and art patronage, progressively peeling back the story's layers amid the tumultuous politics of the fifteenth-century Florentine state.

  • Medieval c.400-c.1600

    ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF IRELAND is an authoritative and fully illustrated survey that encompasses the period from the early Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. The five volumes explore all aspects of Irish art from high crosses to installation art, from illuminated manuscripts to Georgian houses and Modernist churches, from tapestries and sculptures to oil paintings, photographs and video art. This monumental project provides new insights into every facet of the strength, depth and variety of Ireland's artistic and architectural heritage. MEDIEVAL c. 400 c. 1600 An unrivalled account of all aspects of the rich and varied visual culture of Ireland in the Middle Ages. Based on decades of original research, the book contains over 300 lively and informative essays and is magnificently illustrated. Readers will enjoy expanding their knowledge of medieval Ireland through explorations of the objects and buildings produced there and the people who created them.

  • Heroic Failure and the British

    From the Charge of the Light Brigade to Scott of the Antarctic and beyond, it seems as if glorious disaster and valiant defeat have been essential aspects of the British national character for the past two centuries. In this fascinating book, historian Stephanie Barczewski argues that Britain's embrace of heroic failure initially helped to gloss over the moral ambiguities of imperial expansion. Later, it became a strategy for coming to terms with diminishment and loss. Filled with compelling, moving, and often humorous stories from history, Barczewski's survey offers a fresh way of thinking about the continuing legacy of empire in British culture today.

  • Swedish Wooden Toys

    The Swedish toy industry has long produced vast quantities of colorful, quality wooden items that reflect Scandinavian design and craft traditions. This superbly illustrated book, including specially commissioned photography, looks at over 200 years of Swedish toys, from historic dollhouses to the latest designs for children. Featuring rattles, full-size rocking horses, dollhouses, and building blocks to skis, sleds, and tabletop games with intricate moving parts, Swedish Wooden Toys also addresses images of Swedish childhood, the role of the beloved red Dala horse in the creation of national identity, the vibrant tradition of educational toys, and the challenges of maintaining craft manufacturing in an era of global mass-production.


  • Printmaking in Paris - The Rage for Prints at the Fin de Siecle

    In the years between 1890 and 1905, Paris witnessed a revolution in printmaking. Before this time, prints had primarily served reproductive or political ends, but, as the century came to a close, artistic quality became paramount, and printmaking blossomed into an autonomous art form. This gorgeously illustrated and accessibly written book looks at the circumstances in which this terrific new enthusiasm for prints unfolded; the principal players in its development; and the various printmaking techniques being used.

    Most modern French artists experimented with lithographs, etchings, or woodcuts, many of which were published in small editions intended for art connoisseurs and collectors. Their popularity, however, was not confined to these exclusive groups. Colorful prints designed by Pierre Bonnard, Paul Gauguin, Henri-Gabriel Ibels, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Edouard Vuillard, among others, were seen and admired all over Paris in the form of illustrated theater programs, sheet music, magazines, books, and street posters.

    Featuring highlights from the Van Gogh Museum, which houses a superb collection of prints from fin-de-siecle Paris, this enlightening volume shows how the most influential artists of the day turned their hands to making beautiful "impressions"--prints that were works of art in themselves.

  • A Little History of the World - Illustrated Edition

    A glorious illustrated edition of the international bestseller

    E. H. Gombrich's Little History of the World, though written in 1935, has become one of the treasures of historical writing since its first publication in English in 2005. The Yale edition alone has now sold over half a million copies, and the book is available worldwide in almost thirty languages.

    Gombrich was of course the best-known art historian of his time, and his text suggests illustrations on every page. This illustrated edition of the Little History brings together the pellucid humanity of his narrative with the images that may well have been in his mind's eye as he wrote the book. The two hundred illustrations--most of them in full color--are not simple embellishments, though they are beautiful. They emerge from the text, enrich the author's intention, and deepen the pleasure of reading this remarkable work.

    For this edition the text is reset in a spacious format, flowing around illustrations that range from paintings to line drawings, emblems, motifs, and symbols. The book incorporates freshly drawn maps, a revised preface, and a new index.

    Blending high-grade design, fine paper, and classic binding, this is both a sumptuous gift book and an enhanced edition of a timeless account of human history.

  • Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape

    The first history of the bulldozer and its transformation from military weapon to essential tool for creating the post-World War II American landscape

    Although the decades following World War II stand out as an era of rapid growth and construction in the United States, those years were equally significant for large-scale destruction. In order to clear space for new suburban tract housing, an ambitious system of interstate highways, and extensive urban renewal development, wrecking companies demolished buildings while earthmoving contractors leveled land at an unprecedented pace and scale. In this pioneering history, Francesca Russello Ammon explores how postwar America came to equate this destruction with progress.

    The bulldozer functioned as both the means and the metaphor for this work. As the machine transformed from a wartime weapon into an instrument of postwar planning, it helped realize a landscape-altering "culture of clearance." In the hands of the military, planners, politicians, engineers, construction workers, and even children's book authors, the bulldozer became an American icon. Yet social and environmental injustices emerged as clearance projects continued unabated. This awareness spurred environmental, preservationist, and citizen participation efforts that have helped to slow, though not entirely stop, the momentum of the postwar bulldozer.

  • Hard Times - The Divisive Toll of the Economic Slump

    After the financial implosion of 2008, the world sank into the deepest recession since the 1930s. Hard Times asks what this has done to two rich but vastly unequal societies: Britain and the United States. Exploiting an array of data and striking interviews with those affected, Tom Clark documents how misadventures in the towers of high finance cascaded down to the streets below. Everything from PTA membership to sales of playing cards dived during the Great Depression; this compelling book traces the Great Recession's path through our own times, uncovering a drop in life satisfaction, frayed community connections and changing patterns of suicide. In every case, the toll is greater in poor neighbourhoods, due not only to unemployment, but also to the precarious, unreliable jobs proliferating in the recovery. As austerity redoubles the hardship, the book s new analysis suggests scarring that will blight individual and family life for years to come. Over a third of a century, the gap between rich and poor has steadily widened; with the crisis, this economic divide has deepened into a societal schism. Public opinion has polarised in parallel, poisoning politics, and leaving the victims of recession divided and powerless. In more prosperous neighbourhoods the slump might soon be forgotten, but this urgent, authoritative book pulls the scales of complacency from our eyes.It cannot be missed by anyone who yearns for a healthier, happier and less divided tomorrow.

  • Woolwich - Survey of London V48

    Woolwich is a distinctive London district, a riverside settlement with pre-Roman origins which grew into a military-industrial center of national importance. Massive investment fueled a series of military establishments, a naval dockyard, and the Royal Arsenal, bringing prosperity to the town and dominating its economy. At the same time, Woolwich developed a dynamic civic identity, reflected in its impressive municipal buildings and ambitious public-housing program. This historic richness is not well-known. The new Survey of London volume brings together everything of significance in Woolwich's built history, and will prove invaluable to historians, planners, residents, and the wider public.

  • Shaping Humanity - How Science, Art, and Imagination Help us Understand Our Origins

    What did earlier humans really look like? What was life like for them, millions of years ago? How do we know? In this book, internationally renowned paleoartist John Gurche describes the extraordinary process by which he creates forensically accurate and hauntingly realistic representations of our ancient human ancestors. Inspired by a lifelong fascination with all things prehistoric, and gifted with a unique artistic vision, Gurche has studied fossil remains, comparative ape and human anatomy, and forensic reconstruction for over three decades. His artworks appear in world-class museums and publications ranging from National Geographic to the journal Science, and he is widely known for his contributions to Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park and a number of acclaimed television specials. For the Smithsonian Institution's groundbreaking David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins, opened in 2010, Gurche created fifteen sculptures representing six million years of human history. In Shaping Humanity he relates how he worked with a team of scientists to depict human evolution in sculpture for the new hall. He reveals the debates and brainstorming that surround these often controversial depictions, and along the way he enriches our awareness of the various paths of human evolution and humanity's stunning uniqueness in the history of life on Earth.

  • Of Green Leaf, Bird and Flower - Artists′ Books and the Natural World

    Highlighting an enduring interest in natural history from the 16th century to the present, this gorgeous book explores depictions of the natural world, from centuries-old manuscripts to contemporary artists' books. It examines the scientific pursuits in the 18th and 19th centuries that resulted in the collecting and cataloguing of the natural world. It also investigates the aesthetically oriented activities of self-taught naturalists in the 19th century, who gathered flowers, ferns, seaweed, feathers, and other naturalia into albums. Examples of 20th- and 21st-century artists' books, including those of Eileen Hogan, Mandy Bonnell, and Tracey Bush, broaden the vision of the natural world to incorporate its interaction with consumer culture and with modern technologies. Featuring dazzling illustrations, the book itself is designed to evoke a fieldwork notebook, and features a collection pocket and ribbon markers.

  • Does Altruism Exist? - Culture, Genes and the Welfare of Others

    David Sloan Wilson, one of the world's leading evolutionists, addresses a question that has puzzled philosophers, psychologists, and evolutionary biologists for centuries: Does altruism exist naturally among the Earth's creatures? The key to understanding the existence of altruism, Wilson argues, is by understanding the role it plays in the social organization of groups. Groups that function like organisms indubitably exist, and organisms evolved from groups. Evolutionists largely agree on how functionally organized groups evolve, ending decades of controversy, but the resolution casts altruism in a new light: altruism exists but shouldn't necessarily occupy centre stage in our understanding of social behaviour. After laying a general theoretical foundation, Wilson surveys altruism and group-level functional organization in our own species - in religion, in economics, and in the rest of everyday life. He shows that altruism is not categorically good and can have pathological consequences. Finally, he shows how a social theory that goes beyond altruism by focusing on group function can help to improve the human condition in a practical sense. Does Altruism Exist? puts old controversies to rest and will become the centre of debate for decades to come.

  • Magnificent Entertainments - Temporary Architecture for Georgian Festivals

    A thoroughly original study of ephemeral architecture and design, 'Magnificent Entertainments' examines the spectacular displays created for large-scale public and private celebrations in the Georgian period. The book focuses on a number of specific occasions - including elegant country fetes, lavish galas, royal events and historical commemorations - that employed elaborate decorative measures to outshine all other attractions and diversions. It explores the role of leading architects Robert Adam and William Chambers as well as members of the Royal Academy of Arts in creating exceptional party settings for royalty and aristocracy, and adapting well-known public venues for one-night extravaganzas. The author delves into the materials used for construction and embellishment throughout the period: artful applications of dyed sugar, sand, marble dust or chalk lent lustre and colour to tables and floors, whilst painted scenery and transparencies created from thousands of variegated lamps transformed existing venues into unfamiliar marvels. Spectacular stand-alone firework temples and temporary reception rooms were often crafted of little more than wood, canvas and paint. Drawing on primary sources including personal letters, diary entries, bills and newspaper accounts, this book investigates how successful these fanciful designs were in creating fleeting moments of delight with lasting impact and popular appeal.

  • Eccentric Objects - Rethinking Sculpture in 1960s America

    In America during the 1960s, sculpture as an artistic practice underwent a series of radical transformations. Artists including Lee Bontecou, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, H. C. Westermann, and Bruce Nauman offered alternative ways of imagining the three-dimensional object. The objects they created were variously described as erotic, soft, figurative, aggressive, bodily, or, in the words of the critic Lucy Lippard, "eccentric."

    Looking beyond the familiar and canonic artworks of the 1960s, the book challenges not only how we think about these artists, but how we learn to look at the more familiar narratives of 1960s sculpture, such as Pop and Minimalism. Ambivalent and disruptive, the work of this decade articulated a radical renegotiation--rejection, even--of contemporary paradigms of sculptural practice. This invigorating study explores that shift and the ways in which the kinds of work made in this period defied established categories and questioned the criteria for thinking about sculpture.

  • Jay Defeo - A Retrospective

    Jay DeFeo (1929-1989) was part of a vibrant community of avant-garde artists, poets, and musicians in San Francisco during the 1950s and 1960s. Her circle included Wallace Berman, Joan Brown, Bruce Conner, Wally Hedrick, Edward Kienholz, and Michael McClure. Although best known for her monumental painting The Rose (1958-66), DeFeo worked in a wide range of media and produced an astoundingly diverse and compelling body of work over four decades. DeFeo's unconventional approach to materials and her intensive, physical method make her a unique figure in postwar American art.

    In the first comprehensive monograph on DeFeo, Dana Miller looks at the breadth of the artist's work, her cross-disciplinary practice, broad range of interests and influences, as well as pivotal moments in her career. In addition, Miller dispels misconceptions and assumptions about the artist and also offers new insight into her under-recognized works from the 1970s and 1980s. Greil Marcus explores the significance of titles in DeFeo's work; Michael Duncan considers her approach to her career and the marketplace; Corey Keller looks at DeFeo's photographic oeuvre; and Carol Mancusi-Ungaro examines her materials and processes.

    The book features new photography, archival images, and a number of previously unpublished works. Also included are a biographical chronology, an extensive bibliography, and an exhibition history.

  • In the Picture - Self-Portraits, 1958-2011

    A magnificent review of Lee Friedlander's life and career, shown through his self-portraiture

    Lee Friedlander (b. 1934) has been tackling the challenge of self-portraiture throughout his prolific career. What began as an unorthodox investigation of the genre has become a masterful engagement spanning five decades. In this extraordinary compilation, which includes hundreds of previously unpublished pictures, we follow the famous photographer through the years as his personal and creative lives unfold and intertwine.

    Produced to the highest production standards and featuring over 400 duotone images--from his first self-portraits, taken with cable release in hand, to recent images of the photographer with his family and extended network of friends--In the Picture explores Friedlander's various guises throughout a rich and colorful life.

  • Robert Irwin: A Conditional Art

    A comprehensive study of one of the most significant and prolific American postwar artists.

    Frequently associated with California Light and Space Art, Robert Irwin (b. 1928) began as an abstract painter in the 1950s. Since that time, he has worked in architectural and outdoor interventions, developing and expanding what he terms a "conditional" art practice. He employs a wide range of media, such as scrim veils, chain link fencing, Cor-ten walls, flowering plants, palm trees, fluorescent light bulbs, and more. Ultimately, Irwin's medium is none of these specific materials, but rather perception itself - its forms, limits, and possibilities for expansion and change. In the artist's own words, the aim of his work is to change "the whole visual structure of how you look at the world."

    This handsome, richly illustrated volume is the first book devoted to an in-depth investigation of the entirety of Irwin's career, tracing the development of Irwin's ambitions from his earliest canvases to his most recent light installations. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, including the artist's library and his published and unpublished writings, Matthew Simms surveys the full scope of Irwin's creative output, the reception of his work, and its multiple aesthetic and historical contexts. In the resulting thorough yet accessible account, essential for scholars of post-war American art, conditional art emerges as a continual source of renewed aesthetic perception.

  • China - Through the Looking Glass

    For centuries, China's export arts - jade, silks, porcelains and, more recently, cinema - have fuelled Western fantasies of an exotic East and served as enduring sources of inspiration for fashion. This stunning publication explores the influence of Chinese aesthetics on designers including Giorgio Armani, Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Karl Lagerfeld, Ralph Lauren, Alexander McQueen and Yves Saint Laurent. Drawing upon Chinese decorative arts, cinema and costume, notably imperial court robes, the close fitting cheongsam, and the unisex Mao suit, their designs are fantastical pastiches of anachronistic motifs. As in the game of 'Chinese whispers', the process of cultural translation transforms the source material into ingeniously original fashions that are products solely of the designers imaginations. In a similar way, contemporary Chinese film directors render fanciful, highly stylized evocations of various epochs in China's history demonstrating that China's imagery is equally seductive to artists in the East and further inspiring today s designers. Juxtaposing modern fashions and film stills with their forebears in fine and decorative arts and historical dress, China: Through the Looking Glass reveals the rich and ongoing creative dialogue between East and West, past and present.

  • High Style - Masterworks from the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    An alluring, opulent showcase of hundreds of beautiful historic clothing items and accessories

    "High Style is filled with fashion inspiration and information. . . . Nearly every page...includes a captivating photo of one of the collection's lavish garments or accessories."--Threads

    Published for the first time in paperback, this lavishly illustrated volume originally appeared in 2010 to celebrate the transfer of the Brooklyn Museum's historic costume collection to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This comprehensive survey highlights more than 200 works selected from this internationally renowned collection, which comprises nearly 25,000 extraordinary women's and men's garments and accessories from the 18th through the 20th century. Among the featured works are sumptuous 19th-century gowns from the House of Worth, exquisite dresses by the great 20th-century French couturiers, iconic Surrealist-based designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, sportswear classics from pioneer American female designers, and the incomparable draped and tailored creations of Charles James, along with exceptional shoes and accessories.


  • From Ornament to Object - Genealogies of Architectural Modernism

    In the late 19th century, a centuries-old preference for highly ornamented architecture gave way to a budding Modernism of clean lines and unadorned surfaces. At the same moment, everyday objects--cups, saucers, chairs, and tables--began to receive critical attention.

    Alina Payne addresses this shift, arguing for a new understanding of the genealogy of architectural modernism: rather than the well-known story in which an absorption of technology and mass production created a radical aesthetic that broke decisively with the past, Payne argues for a more gradual shift, as the eloquence of architectural ornamentation was taken on by objects of daily use. As she demonstrates, the work of Adolf Loos and Le Corbusier should be seen as the culmination of a conversation about ornament dating as far back as the Renaissance. Payne looks beyond the usual suspects of philosophy and science to establish theoretical catalysts for the shift from ornament to object in the varied fields of anthropology and ethnology; art history and the museum; and archaeology and psychology.

  • Plutocrats United - Campaign Money, the Supreme Court, and the Distortion of American Elections

    From a leading expert on election law, a compelling answer to the dilemmas of campaign finance reform
    Campaign financing is one of today s most divisive political issues. The left asserts that the electoral process is rife with corruption. The right protests that the real aim of campaign limits is to suppress political activity and protect incumbents. Meanwhile, money flows freely on both sides. In Plutocrats United, Richard Hasen argues that both left and right avoid the key issue of the new Citizens United era: balancing political inequality with free speech.
    The Supreme Court has long held that corruption and its appearance are the only reasons to constitutionally restrict campaign funds. Progressives often agree but have a much broader view of corruption. Hasen argues for a new focus and way forward: if the government is to ensure robust political debate, the Supreme Court should allow limits on money in politics to prevent those with great economic power from distorting the political process."

  • Zaha Hadid - Form in Motion

    Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid (b. 1950), known internationally for her radically innovative buildings, has designed furniture and objects since the beginning of her professional practice. This lesser-known aspect of her career takes center stage for the first time in the United States in Zaha Hadid: Form in Motion, which includes furniture, lighting, footwear, jewelry, and other objects that are as experimental in their design as any of her buildings.

    This eye-opening book uncovers Hadid's commercial designs, made between 1995 and 2011, as a means of exploring the interrelationships among architecture, urbanism, and design that define her work. The texts, photographs, and drawings demonstrate Hadid's groundbreaking use of technology in digital design and manufacturing, and the methods and processes that propel her revolutionary formal language. The book also records the installation of her designs within a sculptural environment that the artist created for their display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

  • The American West in Bronze, 1850-1925

    Themes of the American West have been enduringly popular, and The American West in Bronze features sixty-five iconic bronzes that display a range of subjects, from portrayals of the noble Indian to rough-and-tumble scenes of rowdy cowboys to tributes to the pioneers who settled the lands west of the Mississippi. Fascinating texts offer a fresh look at the roles that artists played in creating interpretations of the "vanishing West"--whether based on fact, fiction, or something in-between. These artists, including Charles M. Russell and Frederic Remington, embody a range of life experiences and artistic approaches. Some grew up in the West and based their artwork on first-hand experience, while others never set foot west of the Rockies. Four thematic sections--Indians, animals, cowboys, and settlers--are illustrated with new photography and provide a cultural overview to the works presented. Also included are biographies of the artists, each illustrated with a vintage portrait, plus an illustrated chronology of historical and artistic events.

  • Patterns of Democracy - Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six Countries 2nd Edition

    In this updated and expanded edition of his classic text, Arend Lijphart offers a broader and deeper analysis of worldwide democratic institutions than ever before. Examining thirty-six democracies during the period from 1945 to 2010, Lijphart arrives at important--and unexpected--conclusions about what type of democracy works best.

    Praise for the previous edition

    "Magnificent. . . . The best-researched book on democracy in the world today."--Malcolm Mackerras, American Review of Politics

    "I can't think of another scholar as well qualified as Lijphart to write a book of this kind. He has an amazing grasp of the relevant literature, and he's compiled an unmatched collection of data."--Robert A. Dahl, Yale University

    "This sound comparative research . . . will continue to be a standard in graduate and undergraduate courses in comparative politics."--Choice

  • Yale French Studies, Volume 124 - Walter Benjamin′s Hypothetical French Trauerspiel

    In the summer of 1927, Walter Benjamin wrote about a possible future project on what he called French Trauerspiel, or mourning drama. In this volume of Yale French Studies, an international team of leading scholars of early modern Europe takes its cue from that lapsed project to reread the seventeenth-century French tragic canon as Trauerspiel. These new readings draw attention to early modern French theater's reflections on chance and contingency, political compromise, the question of allegory, the philosophy of the provisional, the place of sound, and the status of the creaturely.

  • Captured by Evil - The Idea of Corruption in Law

    One of the most powerful words in the English language, "corruption" is also one of the most troubled concepts in law. According to Laura Underkuffler, it is a concept based on religiously revealed ideas of good and evil. But the notion of corruption defies the ordinary categories by which law defines crimes--categories that punish acts, not character, and that eschew punishment on the basis of religion and emotion. Drawing on contemporary examples--including former assemblywoman Diane Gordon and former governor Rod Blagojevich--Underkuffler explores the implications and dangers of maintaining such an archaic concept at the heart of criminal law.

    "Underkuffler challenges the traditional rational and logical characterizations of corruption and defends a highly original and insightul proposal. In her view corruption is an emotional concept grounded in religious ideas defying traditional criminal law doctrines. This book is a fantastic contribution to the study of corruption as well as more generally to the study of law and culture."--Alon Harel, Hebrew University Law School

  • The Euro - The Battle for the New Global Currency

    This book takes a look at the tumultuous history of the Euro, its status in global economics and politics, and the pressures that present enormous challenges for the Euro's future. This new edition has been fully updated to cover the dramatic events of 2010-2011, including Ireland and Greece's debt crises and the continuing tension between France and Germany over the future of the Euro.

  • Bruce Nauman - Topological Gardens - Installation Views

    Winner of the Golden Lion for the Best National Participation at the 53rd International Art Exhibition - La Biennale di Venezia, the exhibition 'Bruce Nauman: Topological Gardens' celebrated in this photographic documentation of the thematic installation as presented at three sites in Venice: the U.S. Pavilion at the Giardini della Biennale, and two of the city's most esteemed academic institutions, the Universita Iuav di Venezia and the Universita Ca' Foscari. With a body of work that encompasses video, installation, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, photography and neon, and that spans from the 1960s to the present day, Bruce Nauman (born 1941) is one of the most innovative artists of his generation. Through Michele Lamanna's stunning series of photographs, commissioned by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, this publication captures the visitor's experience of encountering Nauman's work and coincides with the American premiere of the artist's newest works - 'Days' and 'Giorni'- in Philadelphia.

  • What Can and Can`t Be Said - Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the Contemporary South

    An original study of monuments to the civil rights movement and African American history that have been erected in the U.S. South over the past three decades, this powerful work explores how commemorative structures have been used to assert the presence of black Americans in contemporary Southern society. The author cogently argues that these public memorials, ranging from the famous to the obscure, have emerged from, and speak directly to, the region's complex racial politics since monument builders have had to contend with widely varied interpretations of the African American past as well as a continuing presence of white supremacist attitudes and monuments.

  • The World Atlas of Street Art and Graffiti

    An authoritative guide to the most significant artists, schools, and styles of street art and graffiti around the world

    Painted murals first appeared in Latin America in the early 20th century; in the 1950s, spray-can graffiti associated with Latino gangs followed, notably the "cholo" graffiti of Los Angeles. Today, street art has traveled to nearly every corner of the globe, evolving into a highly complex and ornate art form. The World Atlas of Street Art and Graffiti is the definitive survey of international street art, focusing on the world's most influential urban artists and artworks. Since the lives and works of urban artists are inextricably linked to specific streets and places, this beautifully illustrated volume features specially commissioned "city artworks" that provide an intimate understanding of these metropolitan landscapes.

    Organized geographically by country and city, more than 100 of today's most important street artists--including Espo in New York, Shepard Fairey in Los Angeles, Os Gemeos in Brazil, and Anthony Lister in Australia--are profiled alongside key examples of their work. The evolution of street art and graffiti within each region is also chronicled, providing essential historical context. With contributions by the foremost authorities on street art and graffiti, this landmark publication provides a nuanced understanding of a widespread contemporary art practice. The World Atlas of Street Art and Graffiti emphasizes urban art's powerful commitment to a spontaneous creativity that is inherently connected to the architecture of the metropolis.

  • The Houses of Louis Kahn

    A stunning celebration of the architect's residential masterpieces

    Louis Kahn (1901-1974), one of the most important architects of the postwar period, is widely admired for his great monumental works, including the Kimbell Art Museum, the Salk Institute, and the National Assembly Complex in Bangladesh. However, the importance of his houses has been largely overlooked. This beautiful book is the first to look at Kahn's nine major private houses. Beginning with his earliest encounters with Modernism in the late 1920s and continuing through his iconic work of the 1960s and 1970s, the authors trace the evolution of the architect's thinking, which began and matured through his design of houses and their interiors, a process inspired by his interactions with clients and his admiration for vernacular building traditions.

    Richly illustrated with new and period photographs and original drawings, as well as previously unpublished materials from personal interviews, archives, and Kahn's own writings, The Houses of Louis Kahn shows how his ideas about domestic spaces challenged conventions, much like his major public commissions, and were developed into one of the most remarkable expressions of the American house.

  • The Arts and Crafts Movement in Scotland - A History

    This authoritative book is the most detailed account to date of the Arts and Crafts movement in Scotland. Arts and Crafts ideas appeared there from the 1860s, but not until after 1890 did they emerge from artistic circles and rise to popularity among the wider public. The heyday of the movement occurred between 1890 and 1914, a time when Scotland's art schools energetically promoted new design and the Scottish Home Industries Association campaigned to revive rural crafts. Across the country the movement influenced the look of domestic and church buildings, as well as the stained glass, metalwork, textiles, and other furnishings that adorned them. Art schools, workshops, and associations helped shape the Arts and Crafts style, as did individuals such as Ann Macbeth, W. R. Lethaby, Robert Lorimer, M. H. Baillie Scott, Douglas Strachan, Phoebe Traquair, and James Cromar Watt, among other well-known and previously overlooked figures. These architects, artists, and designers together contributed to the expansion and evolution of the movement both within and beyond Scotland's borders.

  • The Taming of the Demons - Violence and Liberation in Tibetan Buddhism

    The Taming of the Demons examines mythic and ritual themes of violence, demon taming, and blood sacrifice in Tibetan Buddhism. Taking as its starting point Tibet's so-called age of fragmentation (842 to 986 C.E.), the book draws on previously unstudied manuscripts discovered in the "library cave" near Dunhuang, on the old Silk Road. These ancient documents, it argues, demonstrate how this purportedly inactive period in Tibetan history was in fact crucial to the Tibetan assimilation of Buddhism, and particularly to the spread of violent themes from tantric Buddhism into Tibet at the local and the popular levels. Having shed light on this "dark age" of Tibetan history, the second half of the book turns to how, from the late tenth century onward, the period came to play a vital symbolic role in Tibet, as a violent historical "other" against which the Tibetan Buddhist tradition defined itself.

  • Comics Art

    A fascinating overview of the history and influence of comics, ranging from the late 19th century to present-day graphic novels and the Internet

    The narrative possibilities of comics art and the accessibility of the form have made it one of the more innovative contemporary genres. Self-publishing and the Internet have given rise to new, autobiographical forms and an increasing number of authors draw from outside the mainstream, whether sexually, ethnically, or politically.

    In this richly illustrated and accessible survey, acclaimed author Paul Gravett considers the vast output of comics culture from the late 19th century to today, including syndicated comics, graphic novels, and contemporary art and illustration. From foundational masterpieces such as Rodolphe Topffer's and Wilhelm Busch's albums, George McManus's Art Deco "Bringing Up Father," and Alex Raymond's "Flash Gordon" to the later retro stylings of Robert Crumb, Gravett considers lines of influence from around the world and examines how comics have shifted from supporting the status quo to becoming the voice of alternative subcultures. Gravett traces the major themes taking place in contemporary comics, noting the rise of publications that function as questioning, transgressive outlets for outsider stories and ideas, and includes the ways that folk art traditions are reinvigorating the form.

  • Culture Crash - The Killing of the Creative Class

    When artists and artisans can't make a living, the health of America's culture is at risk

    Change is no stranger to us in the twenty-first century. We must constantly adjust to an evolving world, to transformation and innovation. But for many thousands of creative artists, a torrent of recent changes has made it all but impossible to earn a living. A persistent economic recession, social shifts, and technological change have combined to put our artists--from graphic designers to indie-rock musicians, from architects to booksellers--out of work. This important book looks deeply and broadly into the roots of the crisis of the creative class in America and tells us why it matters.

    Scott Timberg considers the human cost as well as the unintended consequences of shuttered record stores, decimated newspapers, music piracy, and a general attitude of indifference. He identifies social tensions and contradictions--most concerning the artist's place in society--that have plunged the creative class into a fight for survival. Timberg shows how America's now-collapsing middlebrow culture--a culture once derided by intellectuals like Dwight Macdonald--appears, from today's vantage point, to have been at least a Silver Age. Timberg's reporting is essential reading for anyone who works in the world of culture, knows someone who does, or cares about the work creative artists produce.

  • Too Much to Know - Managing Scholarly Information before the Modern Age

    The flood of information brought to us by advancing technology is often accompanied by a distressing sense of 'information overload', yet this experience is not unique to modern times. In fact, says Ann Blair in this intriguing book, the invention of the printing press and the ensuing abundance of books provoked sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European scholars to register complaints very similar to our own. The author examines methods of information management in ancient and medieval Europe as well as the Islamic world and China, then focuses particular attention on the organization, composition, and reception of Latin reference books in print in early modern Europe. She explores in detail the sophisticated and sometimes idiosyncratic techniques that scholars and readers developed in an era of new technology and exploding information.

  • Tony Oursler/Vox Vernacular

    American artist Tony Oursler (b. 1957) gathers inspiration from the way people's desires are extended through interaction with mass media, specifically cinema, television, and the internet, and creates fascinating video installations that combine words with projections of grotesque and sublime images. Tony Oursler / Vox Vernacular compiles fifty transcripts of Oursler's videos, offering an entirely new way to apprehend the nuances of his work. The selection of pieces featured in this publication date from between 1977 and 2013, spanning nearly the entirety of Oursler's practice. Adding valuable context are scholarly essays explaining Oursler's creative process and full-color illustrations of his videos.

    Among other revelations, these transcripts show that Oursler is not merely a video artist, but a writer as well. The vernacular language that Oursler employs is written to be spoken by "electronic entities" and carries a sort of musical cadence that makes his text surprisingly lyrical. This comprehensive anthology uncovers the poetry in Oursler's work and captures the unique nature of his artistic voice.

  • New Jersey as Non-Site

    "Best in Show" -- 2014 AAM Museum Publications Design Competition

    Between 1950 and 1975, some of the postwar era's most innovative artists flocked to a very unexpected place: New Jersey. Appreciating what others tended to ignore or mock, they gravitated to the state's most desolate peripheries: its industrial wastescapes, crumbling cities, crowded highways, and banal suburbs. There they produced some of the most important work of their careers. The breakthroughs in land, conceptual, performance, and site-specific art that New Jersey helped catalyze are the subject of New Jersey as Non-Site, whose title evokes the mixed-media sculptures that Robert Smithson began to create in 1968 while driving the state's highways with Nancy Holt.

    This catalogue examines more than 100 works by sixteen artists, including Amiri Baraka, George Brecht, Dan Graham, Allan Kaprow, Gordon Matta-Clark, and George Segal. Organized around three themes--ruin, cooperation, and displacement--Kelly Baum's essay considers their work in relationship to seismic shifts in the world of art and equally dramatic changes to New Jersey's economy, infrastructure, landscape, demography, and social stability.

  • Horace - Behind the Public Poetry

    This fascinating study of one of the greatest poets of the Augustan Age sheds new light on Horace's works by the way it combines literary analysis with investigation into the poet's social and political circumstances.
    Lyne's personal and historical approach focuses on the poet's relations with his patron Maecenas, with the Emperor Augustus, and with other grandees. Closely analyzing poems from Satires, Odes, and Epistles, Lyne reveals not only the magnificence of Horace's public literature, but the private man behind it. He shows how Horace neatly balanced deference with the careful assertion of his own social and political standing.
    According to Lyne, Horace was a master of private insinuation, as well as a skilled maker of public poetry. He was also a master in the art of ordering his works: exactly where a poem occurs is often of the subtlest importance. Lyne also examines the resumption of the great political lyric in the Odes of Book 4 (set aside in 23 B.C.), and contends that, beneath the public face, Horace here exhibited resentment, recording views that undermined earlier patriotic statements.

  • Barbara Chase-Riboud - The Malcolm X Steles

    Born in Philadelphia and living and working between Paris and Rome, Barbara Chase-Riboud is an internationally celebrated visual artist, novelist, and poet. This important publication focuses on her monumental series of sculptures dedicated to the assassinated civil rights leader Malcolm X. Begun in 1969, Chase-Riboud's series is explored in terms of developing artistic practice; her travels to China and North Africa; and her experiences in Europe, particularly during the cultural, political, and social upheavals of the 1960s. The volume also includes a fascinating analysis of the Malcolm X sculptures in light of critical debates on abstract art's role in memorializing the past.

    Beautifully designed and produced, this book presents an illustrated checklist of the 13 sculptures in the series, related drawings and sculptures, and a chronology of Chase-Riboud's life and career.


  • One World Now: The Ethics of Globalization

    One World Now seamlessly integrates major developments of the past decade into Peter Singer's classic text on the ethics of globalization, One World. Singer, often described as the world's most influential philosopher, here addresses such essential concerns as climate change, economic globalization, foreign aid, human rights, immigration, and the responsibility to protect people from genocide and crimes against humanity, whatever country they may be in. Every issue is considered from an ethical perspective. This thoughtful and important study poses bold challenges to narrow nationalistic views and offers valuable alternatives to the state-centric approach that continues to dominate ethics and international theory. Singer argues powerfully that we cannot solve the world's problems at a national level, and shows how we should build on developments that are already transcending national differences. This is an instructive and necessary work that confronts head-on both the perils and the potentials inherent in globalization.

  • Unbalanced - The Codependency of America and China

    An original and insightful analysis of the most important economic relationship in the world

    The Chinese and U.S. economies have been locked in an uncomfortable embrace since the late 1970s. Although the relationship initially arose out of mutual benefits, in recent years it has taken on the trappings of an unstable codependence, with the two largest economies in the world losing their sense of self, increasing the risk of their turning on one another in a destructive fashion.

    In Unbalanced: The Codependency of America and China Stephen Roach, senior fellow at Yale University and former chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia, lays bare the pitfalls of the current China-U.S. economic relationship. He highlights the conflicts at the center of current tensions, including disputes over trade policies and intellectual property rights, sharp contrasts in leadership styles, the role of the Internet, the recent dispute over cyberhacking, and more.

    A firsthand witness to the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s, Roach likely knows more about the U.S.-China economic relationship than any other Westerner. Here he discusses:

    • Why America saving too little and China saving too much creates mounting problems for both
    • How China is planning to re-boot its economic growth model by moving from an external export-led model to one of internal consumerism with a new focus on service industries
    • How America, shows a disturbing lack of strategy, preferring a short-term reactive approach over a more coherent Chinese-style planning framework
    • The way out: what America could do to turn its own economic fate around and position itself for a healthy economic and political relationship with China
    In the wake of the 2008 crisis, both unbalanced economies face urgent and mutually beneficial rebalancings. Unbalanced concludes with a recipe for resolving the escalating tensions of codependence. Roach argues that the Next China offers much for the Next America--and vice versa.

  • Alexander McQueen - Savage Beauty

    Alexander McQueen (1969-2010) was one of the most influential, imaginative and inspirational designers at the turn of the millennium. His fashions both challenged and expanded the conventional parameters of clothing beyond utility to a compelling expression of culture, politics and identity. Focusing on the most iconic and acclaimed designs of his prolific career, this stunning book examines McQueen's inimitable technical virtuosity and its subversion of traditional tailoring and dressmaking practices. This book also focuses on the highly sophisticated narrative structures found in McQueen's collections and in his astonishing and extravagant runway presentations, which suggested the most avant-garde installation and performance art. Intended as an assessment of Alexander McQueen's entire career, this book includes in-depth studies of six collections that illustrate and encapsulate thematic chapters as well as an interview with Sarah Burton, the new creative director of Alexander McQueen who had been the designer's right-hand design aide since 1996.

  • Jim Nutt - Coming Into Character

    Favoring fantastical invention, biting wit, and distorted figuration, with roots in mid-20th-century pop culture, Jim Nutt creates wildly original work ranging from paintings on Plexiglas to phantasmagoric portraits of imaginary women. Nutt (b. 1938) first exerted his artistic influence in the 1960s as a member of Hairy Who, a group of artists who, along with other Chicago artists of the era, are more commonly referred to as the imagists. Since 1990 he has focused exclusively on rendering female heads with radically distorted features in spare line drawings and richly detailed paintings accompanied by customized frames. Working with tiny brushes and thinned acrylic paint, Nutt often spends a year creating a single portrait.

    Jim Nutt is the first major publication on the artist in almost two decades, as well as the first to concentrate on Nutt's portraits. Detailing 70 of the artist's works from 1966 to the present, this important selected retrospective examines these paintings and drawings through their precedents in Nutt's work and demonstrates the artist's consistent and inimitable contributions to the art world.

  • Making the Case: The Art of the Judicial Opinion

    Writing in the tradition of Karl Llewellyn's classic The Bramble Bush, Paul Kahn speaks in this book simultaneously to students and scholars. Drawing on thirty years of teaching experience, Kahn introduces students to the deep, narrative structure of the judicial opinion. Learning to read the opinion, the student learns the nature of legal argument. Thus Kahn's exposition of the opinion simultaneously offers a theory of legal meaning that will be of great interest to scholars of law, humanities, and the social sciences. At the center of Kahn's approach are ideas of narrative, persuasion, and self-government. His sweeping account of interpretation in law offers innovative views of the nature of authorship, the development and decline of doctrine, and the construction of facts.

  • Worlds Apart - Poverty and Politics in Rural America 2e

    First published in 1999, Worlds Apart examined the nature of poverty through the stories of real people in three remote rural areas of the United States: New England, Appalachia, and the Mississippi Delta. In this new edition, Duncan returns to her original research, interviewing some of the same people as well as some new key informants. Duncan provides powerful new insights into the dynamics of poverty, politics, and community change.

    "What stories Mil Duncan has to tell! In this new edition of her classic Worlds Apart, she offers sage advice about how to begin to reverse the dangerously growing divide between rich and poor in our country."--Robert Putnam, author of Bowling Alone and Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis

    "A mosaic of intimate portraits revealing the social, ecenomic, and political isolation of rural poverty, Worlds Apart is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand the root causes of inquality in America."--Darren Walker, president, Ford Foundation

  • Culture in Nazi Germany


    A fresh and insightful history of how the German arts-and-letters scene was transformed under the Nazis.

    Culture was integral to the smooth running of the Third Reich. In the years preceding WWII, a wide variety of artistic forms were used to instill a Nazi ideology in the German people and to manipulate the public perception of Hitler's enemies. During the war, the arts were closely tied to the propaganda machine that promoted the cause of Germany's military campaigns.

    Michael H. Kater's engaging and deeply researched account of artistic culture within Nazi Germany considers how the German arts-and-letters scene was transformed when the Nazis came to power. With a broad purview that ranges widely across music, literature, film, theatre, the press, and visual arts, Kater details the struggle between creative autonomy and political control as he looks at what became of German artists and their work both during and subsequent to Nazi rule.

  • Mel Bochner - Strong Language

    An engaging exploration of the use of language in a complex and colorful series of paintings

    Mel Bochner (b. 1940) is celebrated as a key Conceptual artist of the 1960s. Less well-known are his paintings made after that period: complex works based on an exploration of language, often crowded with typography in lush, contrasting hues that both embrace and challenge the painterly tradition.

    Mel Bochner: Strong Language focuses on this important body of work, in which Bochner investigates the lines between text and image. Ranging from bold admonishments and witty emoticons to provocative floods of words, these works demonstrate conceptual seriousness, as well as delight in the playful potential of language. Norman L. Kleeblatt discusses the evolution of Bochner's art from his early word experiments through his return to painting, while Bochner offers a personal perspective. Both Kleeblatt and Bochner address the question of Jewishness in Bochner's work, particularly the ways in which the Jewish intellectual tradition embraces language as a visual expressive form.

  • A Quiet Revolution

    A probing study of the veil's recent return--from one of the world's foremost authorities on Muslim women--that reaches surprising conclusions about contemporary Islam's place in the West today

    In Cairo in the 1940s, Leila Ahmed was raised by a generation of women who never dressed in the veils and headscarves their mothers and grandmothers had worn. To them, these coverings seemed irrelevant to both modern life and Islamic piety. Today, however, the majority of Muslim women throughout the Islamic world again wear the veil. Why, Ahmed asks, did this change take root so swiftly, and what does this shift mean for women, Islam, and the West?

    When she began her study, Ahmed assumed that the veil's return indicated a backward step for Muslim women worldwide. What she discovered, however, in the stories of British colonial officials, young Muslim feminists, Arab nationalists, pious Islamic daughters, American Muslim immigrants, violent jihadists, and peaceful Islamic activists, confounded her expectations. Ahmed observed that Islamism, with its commitments to activism in the service of the poor and in pursuit of social justice, is the strain of Islam most easily and naturally merging with western democracies' own tradition of activism in the cause of justice and social change. It is often Islamists, even more than secular Muslims, who are at the forefront of such contemporary activist struggles as civil rights and women's rights. Ahmed's surprising conclusions represent a near reversal of her thinking on this topic.

    Richly insightful, intricately drawn, and passionately argued, this absorbing story of the veil's resurgence, from Egypt through Saudi Arabia and into the West, suggests a dramatically new portrait of contemporary Islam.

  • Forbidden Music - Jewish Composers Banned by the Nazis

    A groundbreaking study of the Jewish composers and musicians banned by the Third Reich--and the consequences for music worldwide


    With National Socialism's arrival in Germany in 1933, Jews dominated music more than virtually any other sector, making it the most important cultural front in the Nazi fight for German identity. This groundbreaking book looks at the Jewish composers and musicians banned by the Third Reich and the consequences for music throughout the rest of the twentieth century. Because Jewish musicians and composers were, by 1933, the principal conveyors of Germany's historic traditions and the ideals of German culture, the isolation, exile and persecution of Jewish musicians by the Nazis became an act of musical self-mutilation.

    Michael Haas looks at the actual contribution of Jewish composers in Germany and Austria before 1933, at their increasingly precarious position in Nazi Europe, their forced emigration before and during the war, their ambivalent relationships with their countries of refuge, such as Britain and the United States and their contributions within the radically changed post-war music environment.

  • John Singer Sargent: Figures and Landscapes, 1914-1925

    The final volume in a full survey of the work of John Singer Sargent, covering his late watercolors, designs for the Boston murals, and work as an official War Artist

    The last in a series of books devoted to the work of John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), this volume covers the figure and landscape works that Sargent produced between 1914 and 1925. The story begins with the artist painting with friends on vacation in Austria in the summer of 1914, unaware that war was about to be declared. The following year, he began working in London on his ideas for the murals at the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, before spending two years in Boston and exploring other parts of America. While in Florida to paint a portrait of John D. Rockefeller, he produced a group of uniquely Floridian watercolors that are breathtaking arrangements of color, form, and light. In July 1918 he accepted an invitation from the British government to travel to the Somme battlefields as an official war artist. This experience led him to produce a remarkable group of works depicting troop movements, off-duty soldiers relaxing, and the studies for his epic canvas, Gassed. Sargent returned to Boston in 1921 and 1922 to complete his mural projects, and visits to Maine and New Hampshire yielded numerous watercolors. Chapters on Sargent's materials and the framing of his pictures complete this remarkable project.

  • Mary I - England′s Catholic Queen

    A new appraisal of the first Tudor queen, her European connections, her ambitions and intentions, and the religious violence that stained her short reign

    The lifestory of Mary I--daughter of Henry VIII and his Spanish wife, Catherine of Aragon--is often distilled to a few dramatic episodes: her victory over the attempted coup by Lady Jane Grey, the imprisonment of her half-sister Elizabeth, the bloody burning of Protestants, her short marriage to Philip of Spain. This original and deeply researched biography paints a far more detailed portrait of Mary and offers a fresh understanding of her religious faith and policies as well as her historical significance in England and beyond.

    John Edwards, a leading scholar of English and Spanish history, is the first to make full use of Continental archives in this context, especially Spanish ones, to demonstrate how Mary's culture, Catholic faith, and politics were thoroughly Spanish. Edwards begins with Mary's origins, follows her as she battles her increasingly erratic father, and focuses particular attention on her notorious religious policies, some of which went horribly wrong from her point of view. The book concludes with a consideration of Mary's five-year reign and the frustrations that plagued her final years. Childless, ill, deserted by her husband, Mary died in the full knowledge that her Protestant half-sister Elizabeth would undo her religious work and, without acknowledging her sister, would reap the benefits of Mary's achievements in government.

  • Common Ground - German Photographic Cultures Across the Iron Curtain

    A groundbreaking examination of post-war photography in East and West Germany

    This ambitious publication is the first book to thoroughly evaluate the photography that emerged during Germany's geopolitical division from the 1950s to the 1980s. With richly illustrated and exhaustively researched analyses of photographic projects from East and West Germany, including exhibitions, photo-essays, private archives, and photo-books, Common Ground constructs a comparative perspective, examining how sequence, seriality, and repetition were mobilized to produce forms of solidarity and political agency.

    Author Sarah James places German postwar photography in the context of Soviet, American, and European photographic developments; the specific cultural experiences of the Cold War; and the shifting politics of German identity. By reconsidering the relationship between divergent cultures of the pre-war Weimar period and the Cold War era, Common Ground prompts new readings of major figures such as Bernd and Hilla Becher, Karl Blossfeldt, and August Sander, as well as historically neglected figures such as Karl Pawek, Evelyn Richter, and Rudolf Schafer. The result is a groundbreaking study of the political and pedagogical functions of documentary photography.

  • Designing Antiquity - Owen Jones, Ancient Egypt and the Crystal Palace

    In the 19th century, designers became involved in the public presentation of the past, focusing specifically on the decoration of historical monuments. By exploring ornamental designs and the way they represented the cultural concerns of distant civilizations, and in addressing how color may have originally been applied to exteriors and interiors, designers animated the past and incited a new passion for the ancient world.

    A crucial figure in this movement was the designer and architect Owen Jones (1809-1874), who from the 1830s until his death pioneered the study of ancient ornament and its central role in historical traditions of art. Particularly significant were the series of Fine Arts Courts that Jones designed in 1854 for the Crystal Palace's relocation to Sydenham. The ten displays on the great cultures of the ancient world featured detailed re-creations of palaces and courts. Designing Antiquity focuses on Jones's Egyptian Court, which produced a fundamental shift in the way Egyptian art was understood in the second half of the 19th century.

  • Italian Renaissance Book Illumination - 1450-1600

    Hand-painted illumination enlivened the burgeoning culture of the book in the Italian Renaissance, spanning the momentous shift from manuscript production to print. This major survey, by a leading authority on medieval and renaissance book illumination, gives the first comprehensive account in English of an immensely creative and relatively little-studied art form. Jonathan J. G. Alexander describes key illuminated manuscripts and printed books from the period and explores the social and material worlds in which they were produced. Renaissance humanism encouraged wealthy members of the laity to join the clergy as readers and book collectors. Illuminators responded to patrons' developing interest in classical motifs, and celebrated artists such as Mantegna and Perugino occasionally worked as illuminators. Italian illuminated books found patronage across Europe, their dispersion hastened by the French invasion of Italy at the end of the 15th century. Richly illustrated, The Painted Book in Renaissance Italy is essential reading for all scholars and students of Renaissance art.

  • Learning by Doing - The Real Connection between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth

    An important study of the relationship between technology, skills, and economic inequality that answers some of the most pressing economic questions of our time

    Today's great paradox is that we feel the impact of technology everywhere--in our cars, our phones, the supermarket, the doctor's office--but not in our paychecks. In the past, technological advancements dramatically increased wages, but for three decades now, the median wage has remained stagnant. Machines have taken over much of the work of humans, destroying old jobs while increasing profits for business owners. The threat of ever-widening economic inequality looms, but in Learning by Doing, James Bessen argues that increased inequality is not inevitable.

    Workers can benefit by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to implement rapidly evolving technologies; unfortunately, this can take years, even decades. Technical knowledge is mostly unstandardized and difficult to acquire, learned through job experience rather than in the classroom. As Bessen explains, the right policies are necessary to provide strong incentives for learning on the job. Politically influential interests have moved policy in the wrong direction recently. Based on economic history as well as analysis of today's labor markets, his book shows a way to restore broadly shared prosperity.

  • Christen Kobke - Danish Master of Light

    Christen Kobke (1819-1848) was arguably the greatest painter of Denmarks Golden Age, the period of the nations supreme artistic achievement. He had the remarkable ability to invest the simplest corner of town or countryside with charm and delicacy, without resorting to the artificial rhetoric of academic traditions. He endowed ordinary people and places, and simple motifs, with a universal significance. This book gives an overview of Kobkes achievement within its cultural context, and also highlights the most innovative aspects of his work, including outdoor sketching, his fascination with painterly immediacy in the treatment of light and atmosphere, his exquisite originality and his experimental outlook. This book accompanies an exhibition at the National Gallery, London, from 17 March to 13 June 2010. It then travels to the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh, from 5 July to 3 October 2010.

  • Ethics in Reproductive and Perinatal Medicine - A New Framework

    Advances in reproductive and perinatal medicine have given rise to difficult ethical issues. Do all women have the right to choose whether to reproduce? What is the moral status of the fetus during various stages of gestation and what obligations do parents have to the fetus during this period? In this book Carson Strong develops an ethical framework that helps resolve these and many other issues of vital concern to health professionals, policymakers, and the general public.

    Strong begins by exploring the significance of reproductive freedom, drawing on constitutional law and feminist writings, among other sources. Next he assesses the moral status of offspring during preembryonic, embryonic, fetal, and postnatal stages of development, discussing the obligations of procreators during gestation and offering a new perspective on the idea that the moral standing of the fetus increases as fetal development proceeds. He then suggests an approach to the question of how priorities should be assigned to conflicting values, one that draws on a version of casuistic reasoning. In the second half of the book, Strong applies this ethical framework to some of the problematic areas in reproductive and perinatal medicine. These include prenatal genetic testing for susceptibilities to common diseases and for "enhancement" of offspring; research using preembryos and embryos; nontraditional family arrangements, such as surrogate motherhood and ovum donation for older women; and treatment of fetuses with anomalies. His discussion takes into account the clinical dimensions of issues and reflects a thorough consideration of the ethical, legal, medical, and psychosocial literature.

  • Neo-Impressionism and the Dream of Realities - Painting, Poetry, Music

    A beautifully illustrated investigation of Neo-Impressionism in late 19th-century Paris and Brussels

    This stunning catalogue explores the creative exchange between Neo-Impressionist painters and Symbolist writers and composers in the late 1880s and early 1890s. Symbolism, with its emphasis on subjectivity, dream worlds, and spirituality, has often been considered at odds with Neo-Impressionism's approach to portraying color and light. This book repositions the relationship between these movements and looks at how Neo-Impressionist artists such as Maximilien Luce, Georges Seurat, Paul Signac, and Henry van de Velde created evocative landscape and figural scenes by depicting emptiness, contemplative moods, Arcadia, and other themes. Beautifully illustrated with 130 color images, this book reveals the vibrancy and depth of the Neo-Impressionist movement in Paris and Brussels in the late 19th century.

  • Empire to Nation - Art, History and the Visualization of Maritime Bri